Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

“An act further to amendan actentitled ‘An act regulating the mode, of taking the enumeration of the white male inhabitants above the age of twenty-one years,” passed January 10, A. D. 1827. The House have agreed to the resolution in relation to printing 10,000 copies of the report of the Select Joint Committee. The House have agreed to the resolution of the Senate, authorizing the payment of the postage of all public documents, &c. with an amendment; in which they request the concurrence of the Senate. The House have agreed to the preamble and resolutions in relation to the imprisonment of John E. Fletcher, with amendments; in which they request the concurrence of the Senate. The Senate took up the resolution, and the amendments made thereto by the House, providing for the payment of the postage on all public documents, &c. The question being taken on agreeing to the amendments, It was decided in the affirmative. On motion of Mr. Taylor, o ... " The resolution relating to the enlargement of John E. Fletcher, was laid on the table. - - On motion of Mr. Yeo The Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock, P. M.

Two o'clock, P. M.–Senate convened, pursuant to adjournment.

On motion of Mr. Howard, - Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That each.

non-commisoioned officer, musician and private, called out by order of

the Governor, from Sandusky, Seneca and Hancock counties, toguard the Commissioners appointed to run the Northern Boundary line of the State of Ohio, pursuant to an act of the last General Assembly, entitled “An act defining the Northern Boundary of certain counties within this State, and for other purposes,” passed Feb. 23, 1835, be, and they are hereby, entitled to receive such pay as the officers and soldiers in the U. States Army are entitled to; to be audited by the Paymaster General of the Ohio Militia. The question being taken thereon, . . It was decided in the affirmative. Ordered, That the House of Representatives be informed thereos, and their concurrence requested. The Senate took up the resolution relating to the enlargement of J. E. Fletcher, and agreed to the amendments made by the House thereto. A message from the House of Representatives: Mr. Speaker, The House adhere to their disagreement to the amendment of the Senate to the amendment of the House, to the resolution providing for elections on the 17th day of June, 1835. The House have agreed to a resolution fixing on Thursday, the 18th inst. for going into certain elections; in which they request the concurrence of the Senate.

The Senate took up the resolution of the House, providing for elections on the 18th day of June, 1835. * Mr. McKaig Moved to amend the resolution by striking ontoone Associate Judge for the county of Belmont.” The question being taken thereon, It was decided in the affirmative. * , The question then turned on the passage of the resolution, as amended. The question being taken, It was decided in the affirmative—Yeas 31—Nays 2. Those who voted in the affirmative, were Messrs. Alexander, Anderson, Anthony, Atkinson, Blake, Doan, Hawkins, Hopkins, Howard, Johnston, Kendall, Lind, Lyman. M’Dowell, M'Kaig, M'Mechan, Morris, Morse, Newell, Osborn, Pilson, Ravenscroft, Robinson, Shepler, Spangler, Steele, Vincent, Walke, Whittlesey, Yeo and Speaker—31. - - Those who voted in the negative, were Messrs. Taylor and Vance—2. On motion of Mr. Taylor, - Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That his Excellency, the Governor, be, and he is hereby, requested to transmit to the President of the United States, and Heads of Department of the General Government; to the Governor of each State of the Union; and to each of the Senators and Representatives in the Congress of the United States, a copy of his Message and accompanying documents, to the present General Assembly, together with a copy of the report of the Joint Select Committee, on that subject; and that the Sergeantat-Arms be instructed to leave at the disposal of the Governor, a sufficient number of the copies already ordered to be printed, to enable him to carry into effect the objects of this resolution The question being taken thereon, It was decided in the affirmative. On motion, The Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

[ocr errors][merged small]

The Senate convened, pursuant to adjournment.

Mr. Osborn, from the Committee on Finance, reported a bill making an appropriation to defray the expenses of the extra session of the General Assembly, for the year 1835, and for other purposes; which was read a first time.

On motion of Mr. Osborn,

The constitutional rule was dispensed with, and the bill was read The bill was then ordered to be engrossed at the Clerk's table, in order for its third reading and final passage this day. On motion of Mr. Osborn, The constitutional rule was dispensed with, and the engrossed bill, making an appropriation to defray the expense of this extra session, and for other purposes, was taken up, and read a third time. The question being taken on its final passage, It was decided in the affirmative. A bill making an appropriation to carry into effect the laws in relation to the Northern Boundary, was read a third time. The question being taken thereon, It was decided in the affirmative—Yeas 26, Nay 7. Those who voted in the asirmative, were y Messrs. Alexander, Anderson, Atkinson, Blake, Doan, Hawkins, Hopkins, Kendall, Lind, Lyman, McDowell, McKaig, Morris, Morse, Osborn, Pilson, Ravenscroft, Robinson, Shepler, Spangler, Taylor, Vincent, Walke, Whittlesey, Yeo and Speaker—–26. Those who voted in the negative, were Messrs. Anthony, Howard, Johnston, McMechan, Newell, Steele and Vance—7. - Ordered, That its title be as aforesaid, and that the House of Representatives be informed thereof. - The Speaker laid before the Senate a message from his Excellency the Governor, accompanied with certain documents from the Adjutant General; which were read, and laid on the table. A message from the Ilouse of Representatives: Mr. Speaker, . * * The House have agreed to a resolution for printing 400 copies of the Adjutant Generals' report; in which they request the concurrence of the Senate. . . . . A resolution from the House for printing 400 copies of the Adju. tant General's report, was taken up and agreed to by the Senate. The Speaker laid before the Senate a communication from his Excellency, the Governor, together with a communication from Asbury Dickens, Acting Secretary of State U. S. which were read as folfollows, viz:

a second time.

[ocr errors]

ExECUTIVE Office, OIIIo, Columbus, June 18, 1835. To the Hon able, the General Assembly:

I have received a letter from the Department of State, of the 11th instant, signed by Asbury Dickens, Acting Secretary, which purports

to be in answer to my letter to the Secretary of State, of the 1st inst. .

This letter, he says, was written by the instructions of the President

If such is truly the case, and the letter is to be considered as the act of the President, it seems to evince a degree of feeling adverse to conciliation. There appears to be a great contrast between the views con

|

Atained in this letter, and in those contained in some of the former let-
ters of the Secretary of State, as well as those expressed by Messrs.
Rush and Howard; from which it appears manifest that the President
has either been misinformed with regard to the proceedings and claims
of Ohio, or that the sentiments imputed to him in the former letters
of the Secretary of State, as also those by Messrs. Rush and Howard,
were incorrect. It will be perceived that this letter insinuates that
my letter of the 1st instant contained erroneous views of the opinions
of the President, and those associated with him in the Government,
and that the spirit in which it was written had given great concern,
&c. &c. My letter, referred to, as well as the one in reply to which
it was written, are in the documents communicated to you. I consi-
dered my letter of the 1st inst. to have been written in a spirit of 'can-
dor, such as was called for by the occasion, and with a view to correct
erroneous impressions that evidently existed in the Cabinet at Wash-
ington, with regard to the acts, movements, and intentions of Ohio.
That the President and his Cabinet at Washington acted without a cor-
rect knowledge of the facts, as to the claims, proceedings, and inten-
tions of Ohio, is evident by their own acts; for, by a reference to them,
we find that the opinions expressed in the letter of the Secretary of
State, were sounded upon information derived from a source adverse to
Ohio, and which differed widely from the facts in the case. (See the
Secretary's second letter.) . . . . . . .
In my answer to the third letter of the Secretary of State, after giv-
ing him to understand the views of the General Assembly with re-
gard to our Northern Boundary line, and the appointment of Com-
missioners to run and re-mark it, &c. I asked the question, distinctly,
“Whether there were any thing wrong in these acts of Ohio? and
whether the right of Ohio to trace and re-mark the Northern Boun-
dary, as run and designated by a U. States' officer, was disputed, &c.?
In answer to this letter, the Secretary of State, after acknowledging
its receipt, informed me that the President did not profess to inter-
sere, authoritatively, with the performance of any duty imposed upon
me by the State of Ohio. And in a conversation with Messrs. Rush
and Howard, I was informed that no objection would be made to run-
ning and re-marking the line; and in their letter to the Acting Gov-
ernor of Michigan, of the 14th of April, they informed him that it
was the desire of the President that no force should be opposed to
that measure; yet, in the face of this instruction, force was opposed
by the authorities of Michigan.
In reply to that part of my letter of the 1st instant, wherein I stated
that the design of marking the line was not abandoned, and that when
our Commissioners again would meet on the line, they would be pro-
tected against force, &c. the Acting Secretary of State informs us,
that the President would see with great pain any attempt to renew
the running of the line, in the manner alluded to in my letter, as
tending, inevitably, to produce a crisis in which it would be his duty
to interpose. This is very different from the views previously ex-
*.

pressed on that subject, and must excite some degree of astonishment at such a change. A copy of the letter, from the Acting Secretary of State, of the 11th inst. I herewith transmit for your consideration. It may aid you in determining the course most proper to be pursued; and must convince you of the necessity of prompt measures to sustain the honor and Constitutional rights of the State against all encroachments, from any quarter, or under any authority, or pretence of authority, whatSOewer. - All which is respectfully submitted by - * * Your obedient servant, .

* * - ROBERT LUCAS.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
June 11th, 1835.

SIR:— 1 have had the honor to receive your Excellency’s letter of he t1st instant, and have laid it before the President. He has instructed me to inform you, that, although the spirit in which it is written, and the erroneous views it presents, as well of his own sentiments, as of those who are associated with him in the Government, have given him great concern; he cannot, without departing from the course he prescribed for himself, authorize a discussion of various matters contain ed in that communication; which could not, otherwise, be passed over in silence. He is content to learn, however, that the correspondence which has been carried on by this Department, with you, under his direction, is to be submitted to the Legislature of Ohio; and he trusts that his motives and conduct will receive from that enlightened body, the just and liberal consideration, which his knowledge of your Excellency’s character led him to expect (and which he hopes yet to receive) from you. - - The citizens of Ohio are also citizens of the United States, and, the President doubts not, will be found to cherish the feelings and respect the obligations which belong to that character. He looks, therefore, with confidence, to the wise and patriotic councils of the State, for such measures as will not bring the laws of Ohio in conflict with those of the Union. He trusts, too, that upon a calm review of your own duties, your Excellency, not less faithful to the Union than to the State, may be able to aid in adopting that course, which, while it will most effectually prevent such a collision, will be consistent with the rights and dignity of all parties. The President, nevertheless, looks with deep solicitude to the result. It would, therefore, be with great pain, that he would see any attempt to renew the running of the line in the manner alluded to by your Excellency, as tending, inevitably, to produce a crisis, in which it would be his duty to interpose, for sustaining the supremacy of the

« ZurückWeiter »