Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

* sembled, That the State of Illinois shall be one, and is hereby declared to be one of the U. States of America, and admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original States, in all respects whatever. [Approved, December 3d, 1818.]

AN ACT to provide for the execution of the laws of the United States within the State of Illinois.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted, &c. &c. &c. That the laws of the United States, which are not locally inapplicable, shall have the same force and effect within the State of Illinois, as elsewhere within United States.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the said State shall be one district, and be called the Illinois district. And a district court shall be held therein, to consist of one judge, who shall reside in the said district, and be called a district judge. He shall hold, at the seat of government of the said State, two sessions annually, on first Mondays in May and December; and he shall in all things, have and exercise the same jurisdiction and powers which were by law given to the judge of the Kentucky district, under an act, entitled “An act to establish the judicial courts of the United States.” He shall appoint a clerk for the said district, who shall reside and keep the records of the court, at the place of holding the same, and shall receive, for the services performed by him, the same fees to which the clerk of the Kentucky district is entitled to for similar services.

Sec. 3, has provisions similar to those in the act of Indiana.

An act to authorize the President of the United States to ascertain and designate the Northern Boundary of the State of Indiana.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted, &c. &c. That the Surveyor General, under the direction of the President of the United States, be, and he is hereby, authorized and required to cause to be surveyed, marked, and designated, the northern boundary line of the State of Indiana, as divides said State from the Territory of Michagan, agreeably to the boundary as established by the act, entitled “An act to enable the people of the Indiana Territory to form a Constitution and State Government, and for the admission of such State into the Union on an equal footing with the original States,” approved April the nineteenth, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen; and to cause to be made a plat or plan of the said northern boundary of the State, particularly noting the place where the boundary line intersects or touches the margin of Lake Michigan, and return the same, when made, to Congress: Providea, That the whole expense of surveying and marking said boundary line shall not exceed five dollars for every mile that shall be actually surveyed and marked, which shall be paid out of the moneys appropriated for defraying the expense of surveying public lands. [Approved, 2d March, 1827.]

Resolution on the subject of appointing Commissioners for ascertaining, running and marking the Western and Northern Boundary lines of the State of Ohio.

WHEREAs, great inconvenience has been, and is daily occurring, in consequence of the western and northern boundary lines of the State not being ascertained: Therefore,

Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That our Senators in Congress be instructed, and our Representatives requested, to use their best endeavors to have Commissioners appointed on the part of the United States, to act jointly with such Commissioner as may be appointed on the part of this State, to ascertain, run and mark the western and northern boundaries thereof. [Passed, 17th February, 1809.]

Note.—Congress, by their act of the 20th of May, 1812, directed the President of the U. States, to cause to be surveyed and designated the western and northern boundary of Ohio, which was done in 1817, by William Harris, according to instructions given him by the Surveyor General, and run from the most northern cape of the Miami Bay, in a direction to the southern extremity of Lake Michigan, until it intersected the line run due north from the mouth of the Great Miami river. This survey was communicated to the General Assembly; and on the 29th of January, 1818, (being the first session after the line was run,) they passed a resolution recognizing that line as the northerfi boundary, in the following words:

Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That this General Assembly consider the line running from the most northerly cape of the Miami Bay, westwardly, in a direction to the most southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, till it intersects the line running due north from the mouth of the Great Miami river, as the northern boundary of that part of the State of Ohio adjoining the Michigan Territory. *

* The foregoing extracts contain such parts of the original grants, deeds, and acts of cession; resolutions, ordinances, and acts of Congress; constitutional provisions and legislative acts, as relate to the Territory north-west of the river Ohio; the formation of temporary or territorial governments therein; the formation of States, and their admission into the Union; their boundaries, &c. &c.

These extracts I have selected, with as much care as my time, not necessaarily devoted to other duties, would permit. They are now respectfully submitted for the information of the General Assembly, as an appendix to my communication of the 8th instant, as suggested therein. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, * Your obedient servant, ROBERT LUCAS.

Mr. Osborn gave notice that, on to-morrow, he would introduce a

bill supplementary to the act entitled “An act to incorporate the town of Worthington.” Mr. Anthony gave notice that, on to-morrow, he would ask leave to introduce a bill supglementary to the act in relation to the Lunatic Asylum. Mr. McKaig gave notice that, on to-morrow, he would ask leave to introduce a bill further to amend the act, entitled “An act to incorporate the Sandy and Beaver Canal Company,” passed January 11th, 1828. t The Speaker presented the following communication from John Biddle, President of the Convention of Michigan Territory; which was read, and ordered to be laid on the table and the printing dispensed with:— DETROIT, June 1st, 1835. SIR: -

I am instructed by the Convention now in session here, to forward to you the enclosed. - I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, JOHN BIDDLE. His ExcELLENCY, The Governor of the State of Ohio.

[ocr errors]

IN CONVENTION, * June 1st, 1835. *

Whereas, with a view to maintain the jurisdiction and just rights of this Territory, over all the country included within its boundaries, by the Ordinance of seventeen hundred and eighty-seven, and the act of Congress of eighteen hundred and five, a law was passed by the Legislative Council at their last session, entitled “An act to prevent the exercise of a foreign jurisdiction within the limits of the Territory of Michigan.”

[graphic]

And whereas, the provisions of this law, have been construed to render penal, as an act of jurisdiction, the running of any boundary line within the limits of this Territory, except under the authority of the United States or of this Territory.

And whereas, the General Assembly of thc State of Ohio, have passed an act providing for running a line within the original limits of this Territory, and for the extension of the jurisdiction of that State, over all that portion of the Territory south of this line; and the Executive of the State, has attempted to extend this jurisdiction, and run this line, but has been prevented from accomplishing the same, by judicial process, issued by the proper authorities of this Territory.

And whereas, the people of this Territory, can have no other objection to the running of this line, than such as result from its being an exercise of jurisdiction, on the part of Ohio, over a constituent part of the Territory; but are willing, from conciliatory motives, that the

authorities or individuals of that, or any other State, should make any s

survey, not interfering with private rights, which may be useful, in ascertaining and deciding any point in which they may feel interested. And whereas, the people of this Territory, are sincerely desirous that the controversy with the Sate of Ohio, should be amicably adjusted and terminated; and, at all events, that further proceedings should be stayed by the parties interested, until the constitutional tribunals can act on the matter; and are disposed, by an act of forbearance, to evince the anxiety they feel on this subject. Therefore, be it, and it hereby is, Resolved and made known, by the Convention of the Territory of Michigan, assembled for the purpose of forming a State Constitution, That no obstruction or impediment, will, or ought, in their opinion, to be interposed by the people or authorities of this Territory, to prevent the running or re-marking of the line called “Harris' line,” nor any prosecution instituted therefor, provided the same be accompanied on the part of Ohio, by no other exercise of jurisdiction. But it is hereby expressly declared by this Convention, on the part of the people of the Territory, that while they are disposed to make this effort at conciliation, they are determined to assert their own jurisdiction by all the lawful means in their power; and that the authority and jurisdiction of this Territory, will be maintained over all the district of country, extending to Fulton's line, the southern boundary

[ocr errors]

between the Territory and the State of Ohio; the laws duly enforced

over all persons therein; and any attempt to introduce any other authority except that of the United States or of this Territory, by any person or persons, whomsoever, will be immediately repelled, and the laws on the subject, vigorously enforced. s t - JOHN BIDDLE, President. C. W. WHIPPLE, o MARSHAL S. BACON,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

On motion of Mr. Anthony, - -
The Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning, 9 o'clock.

".

TUESDAY, June 9, 1835.

The Senate convened pursuant to adjournment.
Mr. Doan .
Presented sundry petitions from the stockholders of the Batavia
Turnpike and Miami Bridge Company, praying for an alteration in
their charter. | - -
On motion to refer the petition to a committee— -
The question being taken, was decided in the negative—Yeas 10,
Nays 22. • -
Those who voted in the affirmative, were
Messrs. Anthony, Doan, Kendall, Lyman, McDowell, McKaig,
Morse, Osborn, Walke and Speaker—10.
Those who voted in the negative, were
Messrs. Alexander, Atkinson, Blake, Hawkins, Hopkins, Howard,
Johnston, Lind, McMechan, Morris, Newell, Pilson, Ravenscroft, Rob-
inson, Shepler, Spangler, Steele, Taylor, Vance, Vincent, Whittlesey
and Yeo—22.
On motion of Mr. Doan, -
The petitioners had leave to withdraw their petitions.
The Speaker announced the following Standing Committee:
On Finance—Messrs. McMechan, Osborn and Hawkins.
Mr. Osborn
Presented the petition of Warren Jenkins, praying for additional re-
lief for making out an Index to the Journals of both branches of the
General Assembly; also, -
The bill of Conrad Heyl, for repairs to State House, &c.
Which were laid on the table.
Mr. McKaig
Presented the petition of Simpson McFadden and others, accompa-
nied with sundry depositions in relation to the real and personal es
tate of Jacob Simpson, late of Carroll county, deceased.
The further consideration of which was postponed to the first Mon-
day of December next.
Mr. Osborn,
According to notice heretofore given, asked leave, to introduce
a bill to amend the act, entitled “An act to incorporate the town of
Worthington.”
The question being taken thereon, was decided in the negative—
Yeas 9, Nays 24. -
Those who voted in the affirmative, were
Messrs. Anthony, Lind, Lyman, McDowell, McKaig, Morse, Os-
born, Walke and Speaker—9.
Those who voted in the negative, were
Messrs. Alexander, Anderson, Atkinson, Blake, Doan, Hawkins, Hop-
kins, Howard, Johnston, Kendall, McMechan, Morris, Newell, Pilson,
Ravenscroft, Robinson, Shepler, Spangler, Steele, Taylor, Vance, Win-
cent, Whittlesey and Yeo—24 •
On motion of McDowell, the following resolution was agreed to:

[ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »