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sides. The recollection of my mo history from the period of his quitther's letter too, of that letter so un ting Underdown; but as Drench had accountably lost and never recover strongly insisted on the necessity of ed, seemed to give a colour to this keeping his patient perfectly undismode of accounting for the occur turbed, I had taken a liberty which rences said to have taken place; and I knew she would pardon, and broa thousand times did I curse my own ken open the well-known “ fettercarelessness which alone could have locks” which identified her corresput it in the power of any individual, pondent. My first impression was however crafty, to carry on so im to write to my noble uncle immedi. pudent an imposition. The more I ately, but, on more mature reflecrevolved the matter in my mind, tion, as Sir Oliver and Nicholas were after reading, the letter carefully so soon to be at Underdown, I de. over again, the more convinced I termined to delay my communicabecame that this was indeed the fact, tion until I should be able to ascerand my thoughts naturally began to tain whether my hopeful cousin was turn on the perpetrator. Who could or was not the happy contriver of he be? Some one well versed in this precious piece of knavery. Nor our family history, beyond all ques did I fancy that it would be a very tion, or he would at once have stood hard task to put this beyond dispute, detected; then, too, the circumstance when once the object of my suspiof his baving been at the oratorio cions should favour me with an in. Nicholas!-it was, it could be no other terview. than that infernal Nicholas who had While I was yet balancing the played me this abominable prank. pros and cons of the measure, an• His wellknown propensity to mis other billet was put into my hands chief, the comparative ease with by Jennings, signed “ Edward Mawhich he might have succeeded in berly, Captain *** regiment,” repurloining my credentials, the con questing an interview, that he might fidence I had reposed in him as to acquit himself of a commission of my object in returning to London, all some delicacy, with which he was combined to fix him as the author of charged by a brother officer. Wons another of his “jolly good hoaxes.” dering what on earth Captain MaBut then again there were difficul berly, whose name I merely knew ties, and those, too, apparently insur as that of a young officer in a corps mountable, in the way of consider- quartered in the neighbourhood, ing him as my pseudo-representa- could possibly have in common with tive; one, of no ordinary magnitude, myself, the thought suddenly ochad that very morning made its ap curred to me that his business might pearance in the shape of a letter relate to my eccentric fellow-trafrom Sir Oliver Bullwinkle. In it veller, about whom I had felt so the Baronet informed us, that on his strong an interest, till he and his arrival at Oxford he had found his concerns were totally driven out of son slowly recovering from a fit of my head by the succession of unillness, which precluded the possi- pleasant surprises I had since expebility of his having been in London rienced. Of course I gave direcon the evening, he had suspected, tions that the “ gallant officer,” as and declared that he would never the phrase goes, should be admitted trust to the evidence of his own eyes immediately. again. He mentioned his intention The Captain, a gentlemanly, solof delaying his return for a few days dier-like man, whose air and manner longer on Nicholas's account, as he evinced that he moved in the best meant to bring him down with him society, while a scarcely perceptible to the Hall, as soon as he should be touch of “the brogue," betrayed that able to stand the journey; he said, he had drawn his first breath in the too, that he should call on Lord Man-' sister island, was ushered into the ningham in his way. This letter, room, and received my compliment which was almost as long, though with the unembarrassed ease of a man not quite so pithy, as the Viscount's, of the world. Jennings, who, as I had manifestly cost Sir Oliver no fancied, surveyed the stranger with trifling pains in the manufacturing; looks that betokened more of curiit was addressed to my mother, and osity than he was in the habit of contained the whole of his eventful displaying, placed chairs and with

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Pray, sir, is your friend mad?” ils,

lit drew, when my unexpected visitor “my gallant friend," moving away ad

proceeded to open his commission. from the picture, and planting himof This was, he informed me, to place self vis-a-vis to me, while his heightis

in my hand a letter from his friend ened complexion evinced the offence
Captain Fortescue of the ** Dra. he took at my interogatory.
goons, who felt himself compelled “ Simply, sir," replied I, “because
to call upon me for an explanation I cannot conceive that any man in
of my conduct towards a young his senses would think of sending
lady of rank, with whose family he such a letter as this which I hold in
was intimately connected, and an my hand to a man who knows no
nounced himself as deputed by his more of him than of Harry the Eighth,
aforesaid friend, to arrange with any nor has ever so much as seen him in
friend of mine the time and place of the course of his life. He talks of
meeting. Having delivered himself benefits which I never can have con-
to this effect, the Captain quietly ferred, and regrets being obliged to
proffered me the billet alluded to, seek the life of one who has never
and, retiring to the other side of the given the slightest cause of offence,
room, amused himself by reconnoi- either to the lady you have alluded
tring through his eyeglass a Dutch to, or to himself.”
Fair, by Teniers, that hung against “ These are matters of which I am
the wall, leaving me at full leisure no judge, sir," said Maberly coldly,
to peruse the agreeable despatch of nor do I pretend to explain what
which he was the bearer.

the motives may be which, as he

says, compel Captain Fortescue to “Sir,—It is with painful reluc. adopt the line of conduct he is purtance that I yield to the dictates of suing. I have no doubt of their sufan imperious and irresistible neces- ficiency, nor do I question either the sity, which forces me to the per- soundness of his intellect, or his

formance of a task the most revolt- honour.” {

ing to my nature. An interview of “ But, sir," returned I, heartily the kind I am compelled to demand provoked at the turn this affair of you, is at all times a matter to be seemed likely to take, “if your prindeprecated, and is rendered doubly cipal indeed seeks

redress for any indistressing when, in seeking it, I sult offered to Miss Stafford, I am

feel that I am repaying benefit with not the person to whom he should he injury, by aiming at a life which has apply:",

"I believe I am addressing Mr A miserable destiny, however, which Charles Stafford!” was his reply, I am unable to control, will have it accompanied with a look of mingled 80, and forces me to be ungrateful

doubt and surprise. rather than perjured. Be assured, “ Undoubtedly you are, sir, but

dir, no merely human power could Charles Stafford is as incapable of f

have swayed me to the performance offering insult to a lady as Captain
of an act which I detest; but Fate Fortescue or yourself.”
wills it, and I bow to the decree. “ With that, sir, I must repeat, I
My friend, who honours me by con can have nothing to do; my business
veying this to your hands, is fully is simply

to ascertain whether you authorized to make every arrange- will favour my friend with the meetment requisite;

and I have only to ing he desires—I am not here to disadd, that the earlier the hour may

cuss its propriety. I cannot help be that suits your convenience, the observing, however

, that you do not more desirable it will be to

appear altogether unacquainted with “ EUSTACE FORTESCUE. the lady whose cause he advocates, “ C. Stafford, Esq. &c. &c.” a lady whose name certainly never

passed my lips." Mighty civil, upon my word !” “ That Miss Stafford has been Thalf uttered to myself

, as I refolded protected by Captain Fortescue the note; then, in a louder tone, "A from a most audacious and unprin1 most singular invitation indeed !- cipled attempt I am unquestionably

aware; the only thing which I mean What, sir, can possibly induce to deny is that I have been at all you to doubt his sanity ?” 'returned concerned in it.”

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The features of Maberly assumed sable. This, therefore, was my first an expression of incredulity, not un care. I could have wished that Almixed with contempt for what he lanby, on whose honour and friendplainly considered the pusillanimity ship I placed the greatest reliance, of my conduct, in denying all partie might have been the person, but this cipation in a transaction, now that was out of the question; the distance it was no longer likely to pass un was too great to admit of my applyquestioned— There was mis- ing to him; he was still, as I belieunderstanding the meaning which ved, in London, and the shortness of his eye conveyed, and I continued the time which must elapse before with the indignation to which its the decision of our quarrel precluglance gave birth—“ Thus far, Cap- ded the possibility of a communicatain Maberly, I have spoken to vindi- tion being made to him with any cate myself against unfounded asper- chance of success. I therefore turned sion; if you attribute my so doing my thoughts towards the neighbour. to any other motive than that which ing garrison, with many of the officers I have avowed, you are widely mis- belonging to which I was on suffi. taken. The tongue, however, is not cient terms of intimacy to warrant a the only weapon with which I am request that they would do me the prepared to defend my reputation favour to see me shot properly. The when attacked, and you may inforna very first man to whom I applied, a your principal that, if he considers young lieutenant who had been in the this declaration insufficient, I have habit of accompanying me on shootnot the slightest reluctance to grant ing parties of a different description him the meeting he requires, when in the course of the preceding winand wherever be pleases."

ter, willingly undertook the task ; “ When a difference of this kind and this, the first object of my soliexists,” returned my companion, citude, being provided for, I had lei. “ the sooner it is adjusted the better sure to turn my attention to matters for all parties. To-morrow morning, of scarcely less importance. therefore, if you have no objection, To write to my mother--the last my friend will expect the favour of communication she might ever reyour company, at seven, near the ceive from a son, whom, even when ruined chapel in the next parish ; the she believed him to be stigmatized situation is a retired one, and little and branded with justly deserved liable to interruption.”

opprobrium and dishonour, she yet “Rely on my punctuality, Captain found it impossible to banish from Maberly.”

her affections ! The task was in“ Mr Charles Stafford, your most deed a severe one; a thousand conobadient!he replied, resuming his flicting emotions warred in my bohat, and putting on his gloves with the som, and rendered me scarcely caair of a man taking leave after a visit pable of carrying it into execution ; of ceremony; then, with a slight my letter was however at length bend, which seemed to intimate that finished, and contained, of course, an my acceptance of his proposal had absolute disavowal, on my part of the somewhat redeemed me in his opi- whole of the conduct imputed to me nion, he moved towards the door. I by Lord Manningham, the full perrang the bell, and attended him to suasion I felt that my name had been the hall, where we separated, he to assumed for the most infamous of acquaint his principal with the re purposes, together with a detail of sult of his embassy, I to make such such facts as, in the event of my not arrangements as the time would ad- surviving the approaching contest; mit of for meeting my unknown an- might tend to elucidate the mystery, tagonist in the field, and to execute and rescue my memory from the dissome other measures which the un credit which might otherwise attach certainty of the coming event render- to it, should I fall a victim to the ared it advisable for me to set about tifices of an impostor, and to what, forthwith.

an internal voice began to whisper, To procure the assistance of a was a mistaken sense of honour. friend, who might accompany me to That my letter contained also asthe scene of action, and officiate as surances of the warmest love and my second, was become indispen- affection, I need hardly say; the re

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membrance of all my mother's íme before ious Tents So reme
ness, her more than maternal kind leer te in un Army
ness from my earliest inémet-e spomet 2 ET SE
reflection that the step I was DIE
to take might deprire les, & mitz minero rer sur
and for ever, or the only sukce É RE DHS a
her declining years, the mit inne mine
her widowed heart-shat ng saling in
in the encounter Toald 19 suey sin
shake out with a matuvat tant sur
the few remaining seats are in
gered in Time's tang tone z mies en
and " bring down her say bars inęs
with sorrow to the grasel -
spired to unman me, and suik í me te .
a moment the resolution I imtina
ed of meeting my incomprensie te he mums
antagonist

. Not that I was aitagariae in s te sur
free from some rather upiesaten ne z
sations more purely selisi, vien I met
considered the situation in which a rece a se sue
few short hours might place me ad zin een s
the more than questionable prime mit. Drabut when a
tion how far I might be justitet, in what 322
thus exposing myown lifeai uning z mies w.
at that of another, before that timien som har
ty Being, whose denunciationszans tazease mes esame
the crime of murder I could not sinut te s mammat ma
out from my memory. I rain ád I the saints Ar mes
encourage myself by the argument is drtune av
that, as the usagesot civilizat ciety 12 te ,
extend the principle of self-iafenea in sem framment ne se
from our persons to our reputation, rani matatu tule.
I was as much authorized to protestom te staan < 3
that which was dearer to ne fian
life as to defend my life taeif ; a ng, te man
voice, stronger than tia of the authet mat w
world, told me I was wrong. The rilimet i termine .
awakening tones of conscienez. when ai mai mare den. metara
which I would fain have silencei ma sheratie sanat
had it been in my power, wamet ne ins i tot autres ann.
of the fallacy of my reasoning, ant peamine si me. ww
thundered in my ear, a Thou shalt Sarating sa suneste re.
not kill” Pride, that sin by which tell emer 12 -
the angels, and a false shame, the sinking 1 the window
dread of what the world would say, at se sa mar. 200
still drove me on to disregart itz whispered. * ** >
faithful admonitions, and crushet me si nynes
the nascent intention of even yet ny mother. I start the
avoiding to dip my hand in blood, ia ia pre the man
while it presented to my view myself temnes the sun
a mark for scom “ to point its slow lamb suprart her. »
and moving finger at, a wretcher vial, at, a te
object loaded with the contempt and future neering, sua
derision of all who knew me.! cg af in the
it was too late! The die was throwI, who lovaka 17
and I must stand the hazard of the ve, from sis To me
cast. With burning temples, and a blessing was 1122
aching heart, I retired to my room passed are te min manat
without daring to trust myself again light and the arzne, ad un
in my mother's presence, and throw to be aprosening te re.
ing myself on the bed, endeavoured Nothing tonbring sa
to lose in the forgetfulness of slum- vom

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The features of Maberly assumed sable. This, therefore, was my first an expression of incredulity, not un

I could have wished that Almixed with contempt for what he lanby, on whose honour and friendplainly considered the pusillanimity ship I placed the greatest reliance, of my conduct, in denying all parti- might have been the person, but this cipation in a transaction, now that was out of the question ; the distance it was no longer likely to pass un was too great to admit of my apply. questioned— There was mis- ing to him; he was still, as I belieunderstanding the meaning which ved, in London, and the shortness of his eye conveyed, and I continued the time which must elapse before with the indignation to which its the decision of our quarrel preclu. glance gave birth—“ Thus far, Cap- ded the possibility of a communicatain Maberly, I have spoken to vindi- tion being made to him with any cate myself against unfounded asper- chance of success. I therefore turned sion; if you attribute my so doing my thoughts towards the neighbourto any other motive than that which ing garrison, with many of the officers I have avowed, you are widely mis- belonging to which I was on suffi. taken. The tongue, however, is not cient terms of intimacy to warrant a the only weapon with which I am request that they would do me the prepared to defend my reputation favour to see me shot properly. The when attacked, and you may inform very first man to whom I applied, a your principal that, if he considers young lieutenant who had been in the this declaration insufficient, I have habit of accompanying me on shootnot the slightest reluctance to grant ing parties of a different description him the meeting he requires, when in the course of the preceding winand wherever he pleases."

ter, willingly undertook the task ; “ When a difference of this kind and this, the first object of my soli. exists,” returned my companion, citude, being provided for, I had lei“the sooner it is adjusted the better sure to turn my attention to matters for all parties. To-morrow morning, of scarcely less importance. therefore, if you have no objection, To write to my mother the last my friend will expect the favour of communication she might ever reyour company, at seven, near the ceive from a son, whom, even when ruined chapel in the next parish ; the she believed him to be stigmatized situation is a retired one, and little and branded with justly deserved liable to interruption."

opprobrium and dishonour, she yet “Rely on my punctuality, Captain found it impossible to banish from Maberly."

her affections ! The task was in“ Mr Charles Stafford, your most deed a severe one; a thousand conobadient!” he replied, resuming his flicting emotions warred in my bohat, and putting on his gloves with the som, and rendered me scarcely caair of a man taking leave after a visit pable of carrying it into execution ; of ceremony; then, with a slight my letter was however at length bend, which seemed to intimate that finished, and contained, of course, an my acceptance of his proposal had absolute disavowal, on my part, of the somewhat redeemed me in his opi- whole of the conduct imputed to me nion, he moved towards the door. I by Lord Manningham, the full perrang the bell, and attended him to suasion I felt that my name had been the hall, where we separated, he to assumed for the most infamous of acquaint his principal with the re- purposes, together with a detail of sult of his embassy, I to make such such facts as, in the event of my not arrangements as the time would ad- surviving the approaching contest; mit of for meeting my unknown an might tend to elucidate the mystery, tagonist in the field, and to execute and rescue my memory from the dissome other measures which the un. credit which might otherwise attach certainty of the coming event render- to it, should I fall a victim to the ared it advisable for me to set about tifices of an impostor, and to what, forthwith.

an internal voice began to whisper, To procure the assistance of a was a mistaken sense of honour. friend, who might accompany me to That my letter contained also asthe scene of action, and officiate as surances of the warmest love and my second, was become indispen- affection, I need hardly say; the re

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