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THE

WORKS OF VIRGIL,

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE

By JOHN DRYDEN.

Sequiturque patrem non passibus æquis.

A NEW EDITION;

WITH

REMARKS on the CORRECTIONSof DR. CAREY.

VOL. II.

LONDON:

TRINTED FOR J. JOHNSON; R. BALDWIN; F. AND C. RIVINGTON;

W. J. AND J. RICHARDSON; W. OTRIDGE AND SON; R. FAULDER;
J. WALKER; G. KEARSLEY; LACKINGTON, ALLEN, AND CO.,
CADELL AND DAVIES; AND B. CROSBY.

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GEORGICS,

BOOK III.

ARGUMENT. This book begins with the invocation of some rural deities, and

a compliment to Augustus: after which Virgil directs himself to Mæcenas, and enters on his subject. He lays down rules for the breeding and management of horses, oxen, sheep, goats, and dogs; and interweaves several pleasant descriptions of a chariot-race, of the battle of the bulls, of the force of love, and of the Scythian winter. In the latter part of the book, he relates the diseases incident to cattle ; and ends with the description of a fatal murrain that formerly raged among the Alps.

THY fields, propitious Pales, I rehearse;
And sing. thy pastures in no vulgar verse,
Amphrysian shepherd! the Lycæan woods,
Arcadia's flow'ry plains, and pleasing floods.

All other themes, that careless minds invite,
Are worn with use, unworthy me to write.

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Busiris' altars, and the dire decrees
Of hard Eurystheus, ev'ry reader sees:
Hylas the boy, Latona's erring isle,
And Pelops' iv'ry shoulder, and his toil

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For fair Hippodame, with all the rest
Of Grecian tales, by poets are express’d.
New ways I must attempt, my grov'ling name
To raise aloft, and wing my flight to fame.

I, first of Romans, shall in triumph come 15 From conquer'd Greece, and bring her trophies home, With foreign spoils adorn my native place, And with Idume's palms my Mantua grace. Of Parian stone a temple will I raise, Where the slow Mincius through the valley strays, 20 Where cooling streams invite the flocks to drink, And reeds defend the winding water's brink. Full in the midst shall mighty Cæsar stand, Hold the chief honours, and the dome command. Then I, conspicuous in my Tyrian gown 25 (Submitting to his godhead my renown), A hundred coursers from the goal will drive: The rival chariots in the race shall strive.

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