The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin: Accurately Revised, in Twelve Volumes. Adorned with Copper-plates; with Some Account of the Author's Life, and Notes Historical and Explanatory, Volume 13

Capa
C. Bathurst, T. Osborne, W. Bowyer, J. Hinton, W. Strahan, B. Collins, J. Rivington, R. Baldwin, L. Davis and C. Reymers, and J. Dodsley., 1765
 

O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha

Não encontramos nenhuma resenha nos lugares comuns.

Páginas selecionadas

Outras edições - Visualizar todos

Termos e frases comuns

Passagens mais conhecidas

Página 212 - London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys, and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas, as he went to court, or returned from it. AS he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door, to go in to the king; and would let them know exactly at what hour he intended to come out again, and return to his lodgings...
Página 270 - ... thousand pounds by the most favourable computation, half in the regular way, and half in the prudential.
Página 257 - French, from whence we borrow the word, have a quite different idea of the thing, and so had we in the politer age of our fathers. Raillery was to say something that at first appeared a reproach or reflection, but by some turn of wit, unexpected and surprising, ended always in a compliment, and to the advantage of the person it was addressed to.
Página 210 - I sent a party to each of the five farmers' houses. This villain Steele had murdered above forty of the king's subjects in cold blood, and, as I was informed, had often laid snares to entrap me ; but it happened that, although he usually kept a gang to attend him, yet at this time he had none, when he stood in the greatest need.
Página 257 - Raillery is the finest part of conversation; but, as it is our usual custom to counterfeit and adulterate whatever is too dear for us, so we have done with this, and turned it all into what is generally called repartee, or being smart; just as when an expensive fashion comes up, those who are not able to reach it, content themselves with some paltry imitation.
Página 262 - I conceive their refinements were grounded upon reason, and that a little grain of the romance is no ill ingredient to preserve and exalt the dignity of human nature, without which it is apt to degenerate into everything that is sordid, vicious, and low.
Página 212 - His unusual dress and figure, when he was in London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas as he went to court or returned from it. As he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door to go...
Página 270 - He bears the gallantries of his lady with the indifference of a Stoic ; and thinks them well recompensed by a return of children to support his family, without the fatigues of being a father.
Página 208 - I dreamed that I had found Captain David Steele, a notorious rebel, in one of the five farmers...
Página 252 - ... may not acquire without any great genius or study. For nature hath left every man a capacity of being agreeable, though not of shining in company...

Informações bibliográficas