The Class of 1761: Examinations, State, and Elites in Eighteenth-Century China

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Stanford University Press, 12.08.2004 - 312 Seiten

The Class of 1761 reveals the workings of China's imperial examination system from the unique perspective of a single graduating class. The author follows the students' struggles in negotiating the examination system along with bureaucratic intrigue and intellectual conflict, as well as their careers across the Empire—to the battlefields of imperial expansion in Annam and Tibet, the archives where the glories of the empire were compiled, and back to the chambers where they in turn became examiners for the next generation of aspirants.

The book explores the rigors and flexibilities of the examination system as it disciplined men for political life and shows how the system legitimated both the Manchu throne and the majority non-Manchu elite. In the system's intricately articulated networks, we discern the stability of the Qing empire and the fault lines that would grow to destabilize it.

 

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Inhalt

1 The Meanings of Examination
1
2 Regulating Aspirations
25
3 Spring Rites
57
4 Fair Fraud and Fraudulent Fairness
107
5 Paths to Glory
144
Definitions of Failure
197
Appendix 1 Grades for the Annual Examination
207
Appendix 2 Provincial Examination Quotas
209
Appendix 4 Price of Imperial College Studentships
211
Appendix 5 1761 Class List
212
Character List
221
Reference Matter
231
Notes
233
Bibliography
275
Index
293
Urheberrecht

Appendix 3 Number of Attempts for the Metropolitan Degree
210

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Über den Autor (2004)

Iona D. Man-Cheong is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

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