Domesday Book and Beyond: Three Essays in the Early History of England

Capa
University Press, 1907 - 527 páginas
 

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Página 24 - ... how much meadow; how much pasture; how many mills; how many fisheries...
Página 223 - ... the baronial castle. When, therefore, we speak, as we shall have to speak, of forces which make for the subjection of the peasantry to seignorial justice and which substitute the manor with its villeins for the free village, we shall — so at least it seems to us — be speaking, not of abnormal forces, not of retrogression, not of disease, but in the main of normal and healthy growth. Far from us indeed is the cheerful optimism which refuses to see that the process of civilization is often...
Página 345 - Even had our anthropologists at their command material that would justify them in prescribing a normal programme for the human race and in decreeing that every independent portion of mankind must, if it is to move at all, move through one fated series of stages which may be designated as Stage A., Stage B, Stage C, and so forth, we still should have to face the fact that the rapidly progressive groups have been just those which have not been independent, which have not worked out their own salvation,...
Página 24 - They inquired what the manor was called; who held it in the time of King Edward; who holds it now; how many hides...
Página 356 - Horsa with machine guns or pictured the Venerable Bede correcting proofs for the press; we shall have built upon a crumbling foundation. The most efficient method of protecting ourselves against such errors is that of reading our history backwards as well as forwards, of making sure of our middle ages before we talk about the 'archaic/ of accustoming our eyes to the twilight before we go out into the night.
Página 13 - ... Frensham and some other villages. If we mistake not, all that Domesday Book has to say of the whole of this territory is that the Bishop of Winchester holds Farnham, that it has been rated at 60 hides, that it...
Página 522 - A century hence the student's materials will not be in the shape in which he finds them now. In the first place, the substance of Domesday Book will have been rearranged. Those villages and hundreds which the Norman clerks tore into shreds will have been reconstituted and pictured in maps...
Página 24 - ... their Frenchmen and of the whole hundred, of the priest, the reeve and six villeins of each vill.
Página 378 - It seems to tell of plentiful land, sparse population and poor husbandry. This is of some importance. There is a good deal of evidence pointing to the conclusion that, whereas in the oldest days men really ploughed an acre in a forenoon, the current of agricultural progress made for a while towards the diminution of the space that was covered by a day's labour. In ^Elfric's dialogue the ploughman complains that each day he must till 'a full acre or more8.
Página 183 - But, to say nothing of hamlets, we have full two hundred and fifty parishes whose names end in burgh, borough or bury, and in many cases we see no sign in them of an ancient camp or of an exceptionally dense population. It seems a mere chance that they are not tons or hams, worths or thorpes. Then again, in Essex and neighbouring shires it is common to find that in the village called X there is a squire's mansion or a cluster of houses called X-bury. Further, we can see plainly from our oldest laws...

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