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MATERIALS

FOR

TRANSLATING FROM ENGLISH INTO GERMAN.

PART I.

EXERCISES ON THE CHIEF RULES OF GRAMMAR.

I. ON THE ARRANGEMENT OF WORDS.

1. The sonsa of Junius Brutus had conspired b against o the republicd of Rome ®; their father, therefore', punisheds them very severely", for he orderedj them to be beheaded * in spite of the intercession m of the Romansin their favour.

2. There are a few writers b, foro whom the reader feelsd such personale kindnessf as for Oliver Goldsmith.

3. He had no a intention of leaving his children money,

k

1. a Sohn (pl. Sähne). b sich verschwdren, and the Participle stands at the end of the sentence. «gegen with Acc. 4 Freistaat, m. e Rom. daher; and mark, the Adverb can never stand between the Subject and the Verb. 6 bestrafen. hftrenge. i denn, a conjunction which has no influence on the construction of the sentence. j lassen, which is always followed by an infinite act. say, the head to be cut off to them ihnen den Kopf abschlagen. 'ungeachtet with Gen. m Fürbitte, f. n Römer. say, to their favour zu ihren Gunsten.

2. a es giebt. b Schriftsteller. für with Acc. d mark, in a relative sentence the Verb stands last. e perjdnlich. Wohlwollen, n.

3. a kein, teine, kein. b Utsicht, f. Csay, to leave zu hinterlassen, and mark, the Infin. stands at the end of the sentence.

B

PAGE.

V. Desire of Knowledge (Boswell)

110-111

VI. The Sack of Magdeburg (Half Hours)

111-121

VII. Letter to a Friend..

121

VIII. Letter to a Friend....

IX. Griseldis (Letters from the Baltic)

123-128

X. Character of Oliver Goldsmith (Washington

Irving)

128---130

XI. Goldsmith's Parentage and Birthplace (Wash-

ington Irving)..

130-132

XII. Goldsmith's Father (Washington Irving) 132-134

XIII. Goldsmith Rejected by the Bishop (Washington

Irving)....

134-135

XIV. Goldsmith's Letter to his Mother

135-142

XV. Letter to a Friend....

142

XVI. Wolves in Courland (Letters from the Baltic).. 143—147

XVII. The Spectator's Introduction (Addison) 147—153

XVIII. The Vanity of a Great Man (Half Hours) 153-154

XIX. On Popular Superstition ( Addison)

154-159

XX On Stories of Ghosts (Addison)

159-164

XXI. Letter to a Friend...

164-165

XXII. Paoli and Napoleon (Lockhart)

166-168

XXIII. Napoleon at Toulon (Lockhart)

168–177

XXIV. Josephine de Beauharnois (Lockhart)

177-179

XXV. The Battles of the Pyramids and of Aboukir

(Lockhart)

179—185

XXVI. The Voyage (Washinyton Irving)

185-188

XXVII. Character of Lorenzo de' Medici (Roscoe)...... 188—191

XXVIII. Influence of Liberty on the Florentines (Roscoe) 191—193

XXIX. On Dr. Johnson's Lives of the Poets (Roscoe).. 1:13—194

XXX. Study of Ancient Literature in Italy (Roscoe).. 194–195

XXXI. Character of the Earl of Strafford (Macaulay).. 195–196

XXXII. Christian, King of Denmark and Sweden, in

Italy (Roscoe)

196-198

XXXIII. William, Prince of Orange (Macaulay) ... 198—200

XXXIV. Generosity of Louis the Fourteenth (Macaulay) 201—201

XXXV. Sir Robert Walpole's Reply to Sir John St.

Aubin's Speech for Repealing the Septennial

Act

205--207

XXXVI On Sincerity (Tillotson)

208-210

MATERIALS

FOR

TRANSLATING FROM ENGLISH INTO GERMAN.

PART I.

EXERCISES ON THE CHIEF RULES OF GRAMMAR.

I. ON THE ARRANGEMENT OF WORDS.

k

1. The sons a of Junius Brutus had conspired b against o the republic of Romee; their father, therefore", punished them very severely , for he ordered; them to be beheaded in spite of the intercession of the Romansh in their favour.o

2. There are a few writers b, foro whom the reader feelsd such personale kindness as for Oliver Goldsmith.

3. He had no a intention of leaving his children money,

1. a Sohn (pl. Söhne). b sich verschwören, and the Participle stands at the end of the sentence. cgegen with Acc. & Freistaat, m. e Rom. daher; and mark, the Adverb can never stand between the Subject and the Verb. & bestrafen. hftrenge. i denn, a conjunction which has no influence on the construction of the sentence. j lassen, which is always followed by an infinite act. k say, the head to be cut off to them ihnen den Kopf abschlagen. ungeachtet with Gen. bitte, f. n Römer. say, to their favour zu ihren Gunsten.

2. a es giebt. Schriftsteller. für with Acc. d mark, in a relative sentence the Verb stands last. e perjdnlich. Wohlwollen, n.

3. a kein, teine, kein. b Utsicht, f. Csay, to leave zu hinterlassen, and mark, the Infin. stands at the end of the sentence.

m Für

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b

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B

PAGE.

V. Desire of Knowledge (Boswell)

110-111

VI. The Sack of Magdeburg (Half Hours)

111-121

VII. Letter to a Friend.....

121

VIII. Letter to a Friend..

122

IX. Griseldis (Letters from the Baltic)

123-128

X. Character of Oliver Goldsmith (Washington

Irving)

128--130

XI. Goldsmith's Parentage and Birthplace (Wash-

ington Irving).

130-132

XII. Goldsmith's Father (Washington Irving) 132-134

XIII. Goldsmith Rejected by the Bishop (Washington

Irving).....

134-135

XIV. Goldsmith's Letter to his Mother

1354142

XV. Letter to a Friend...

142

XVI. Wolves in Courland (Letters from the Baltic).. 143—147

XVII. The Spectator's Introduction (Addison)

147-153

XVIII. The Vanity of a Great Man (Half Hours) 153-154

XIX. On Popular Superstition ( Addison)

154-159

XX On Stories of Ghosts (Addison)

159-164

XXI. Letter to a Friend...

164-165

XXII. Paoli and Napoleon (Lockhart)

166-168

XXIII. Napoleon at Toulon (Lockhart)

168–177

XXIV. Josephine de Beauharnois (Lockhart)

177-179

XXV. The Battles of the Pyramids and of Aboukir

(Lockhart)

179—185

XXVI. The Voyage (Washinyton Irving)

185—188

XXVII. Character of Lorenzo de' Medici (Roscoe)...... 188—191

XXVIII. Influence of Liberty on the Florentines (Roscoe) 191–193

XXIX. On Dr. Johnson's Lives of the Poets (Roscoe).. 193—194

XXX. Study of Ancient Literature in Italy (Roscoe).. 194—195

XXXI. Character of the Earl of Strafford (Macaulay).. 195—196

XXXII, Christian, King of Denmark and Sweden, in

Italy (Roscoe)

196—198

XXXIII. William, Prince of Orange (Macaulay) 198-200

XXXIV. Generosity of Louis the Fourteenth (Macaulay) 201—204

XXXV. Sir Robert Walpole's Reply to Sir John St.

Aubin's Speech for Repealing the Septennial

Act

205–207

XXXVI On Sincerity (Tillotson)

208-210

MATERIALS

FOR

TRANSLATING FROM ENGLISH INTO GERMAN.

PART 1.

EXERCISES ON THE CHIEF RULES OF GRAMMAR.

I. ON THE ARRANGEMENT OF WORDS.

1. The sons a of Junius Brutus had conspired b against © the republicd of Rome"; their father, therefore, punished s them very severely , fori he orderedj them to be beheaded in spite of the intercession m of the Romans" in their favour.o

2. There are a few writers", for whom the reader feelsd such personale kindness f as for Oliver Goldsmith.

3. He had no a intention of leaving his children money,

* 1. a Sohn (pl. Söhne). b sich verschwören, and the Participle stands at the end of the sentence. cgegen with Acc. Freistaat, m. e Rom. daher; and mark, the Adverb can never stand between the Subject and the Verb. & bestrafen. hftrenge. i denn, a conjunction which has no influence on the construction of the sentence. j lassen, which is always followed by an infinite act. k say, the head to be cut off to them ihnen den Kopf abschlagen. ungeachtet with Gen.

m Fürbitte, f. n Römer. o say, to their favour zu ihren Gunsten.

2. a es giebt. b Schriftsteller. <für with Acc. d mark, in a relative sentence the Verb stands last. e persönlich. Wohlwollen, n.

3. a tein, teine, kein. b Atsicht, f. say, to leave zu hinterlassen, and mark, the Infin. stands at the end of the sentence.

B

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