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man, must at times turn to the circles of a domestic nature, where the joys and wishes of society are chiefly centered

Beauty is a Banquet !
Matrimony is the Meal!
Love is the Sauce,
And Pleasantry the Garnish!

We will only at present talk of two of them,

LOVE AND MATRIMONY.

Various opinions have been given by writers of every description. The grave-the gay-the witty and the profound, respecting the passion of love, and the institution of marriage. In early times the laws of some states were not so certainly, so lastingly binding, as at present. We read in the Bible that when a man inarried a woman, and after a little time she found no favor in his eyes,” (that is, I suppose, after he grew tired of her) “ Let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give it her, and send her out of his house." It should be observed that then there was no occasion to trouble lawyers about passing a divorce bill : you could write it yourself. By the bye, as matters now stand, you pay the

parsons for marrying, and pay Parliament (or their clerks) for unmarrying. But the Jew method was much less expensive: they had only to write a few words, and send the wife back again. This is like being at a tavern, and after a good meal, you draw a cork, but don't like the wine: you then attach to it a slip of paper by way

of label, on which you write—“ Bad bottle !- bring another !” But it is possible a bottle may be shook ! so may a wife !- that's wrong: Shaking-spoils women as well as wine! But it is hard in both cases, and with all parties, to swallow what you don't like! But let us look at the most pleasing side of the picture ; for every picture has two sides, and should be held in the light, where you may see it to the most advantage. It has been said, -I think by the witty Duke of Buckingham, or his friend (equally clever) for on this point they were both of one opinion.

“ Love is the sweet that in our cup is thrown
To make the nauseous draught of life go down !"

This is very true; and still further

Sages maintain, with weighty reasons given,
That marriages are surely made in heaven!

So I believe ; for otherwise I cannot account for many things that happen on earth.

I mean (of course) 'mong men“ Of mortal calling"
Whom Pride itself, sometimes can't save from fulling."

It was a good thought of Farquar’s thus to rank pride among the virtues, in order to save himself and all other poor sinking souls from sinning! I am again wandering too far from my history : I must marry myself again in order to be more constant to my theme.

After a widow-hood of about seventeen years, pride on neither side being sufficiently alert, I again fell into the noose of matrimony; I use the word noose because it is said “ Marriage and hanging go by destiny! This proverb comes as pat to my purpose as the former one.

Being at this time resident in Barnstaple, and acquainted with a priest, the Rev. Mr. Dyer, brother to General Dyer, who lived several years in Taunton, I was reminded by this Reverend Gentleman how easily and how snugly the marriage job could be done by his assistance. The word snugly caught my attention, and I replied “ we'll talk the subject over to-morrow.” I had always even before my first marriage an objection against being stared at, while going to church. I did not much mind the coming back again : besides the coming back may be quietly done if proper steps are taken; for as the hope of money sets bells a-going, so money given, will keep them silent: at least, till you get home, and then no matter whether the bells clatter or not: a clattering of some sort every married man must expect. My first marriage was done in the same snug way at Blandford in Dorset. We had then two maiden ladies for our guides who are always perfect in marriage ceremonies, though not married themselves. I had then a Mr. Dyke in my company, and he having heard my objections about being stared at, he absolutely crept behind a window curtain, and watched me all the way to the church, expecting that if I was met by any of my acquaintance, I should run back again! I never could help thinking that a man looks very simple when he is going to be married! and well ke may ! only observe: This great “ Lord and Master” as he fancies himself, goes to make a solemn row to be answerable

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not only for iis own faults, but for those of his intended rib too! Mercy on us! If he should fancy there are no faults on either side to be answerable for, he is the. more to be pitied; a few weeks may destroy the illusion on both sides : and the worst of it is,

wisest men are often the greatest fools on these occasions. So that all we can do is to shut our eyes, and jump in the dark! A man of good sense and true courage, will as an experienced Fox hunter, show his horse the leap he is about to encounter; and will look over the hedge himself before he suffers his horse to attempt it. But the fool and coward, not having courage to look forward, shuts both his eyes, blunders over, and falls into a stone quarry, or down a precipice! It is proverbial that marriage is generally a leap in the dark ! and in certain cases, dark or light, is much the same thing. We none of us see far on these occasions : as the maggot bites, it is a mere matter of whim or fancy. Every man has his humour, or as Sterne says, every ene has his hobby-horse ! or as Dr. Franklin expresses it, every man has his whistle, and lucky he whose whistle is his wife! But the latter cannot so easily be whistled off! happy he who never would so whistle! This whistle calls me back to Barnstaple, where I was (for the second time) on the way to be married. My Reverend Friend, Mr. Dyer, was ready at the appointed time ; and so for once was I, which was rather strange; for the church being at least two miles I went on horse-back : the horse knew the road, so that I threw the bridle reins on his neck, and let him pick out the path that best pleased him. The church was my guide, because it is said “ Marriage and hanging go by destiny! This proverb comes as pat to my purpose as the former one.

Being at this time resident in Barnstaple, and acquainted with a priest, the Rev. Mr. Dyer, brother to General Dyer, who lived several years in Taunton, I was reminded by this Reverend Gentleman how easily and how snugly the marriage job could be done by his assistance. The word snugly caught my attention, and I replied “ we'll talk the subject over to-morrow." I had always even before my first marriage an objection against being stared at, while going to church. I did not much mind the coming back again : besides the coming back may be quietly done if proper steps are taken; for as the hope of money sets bells a-going, so money given, will keep them silent: at least, till you get home, and then no matter whether the bells clatter or not: a clattering of some sort every married man must expect. My first marriage was done in the same snug way at Blandford in Dorset. We had then two maiden ladies for our guides who are always perfect in marriage ceremonies, though not married themselves. I had then a Mr. Dyke in my company, and he having heard my objections about being stared at, he absolutely crept behind a window curtain, and watched me all the way to the church, expecting that if I was met by any of my acquaintance, I should run back again! I never could help thinking that a man looks very simple when he is going to be married! and well ke may ! only observe : This great “ Lord and Master” as he fancies himself, goes to make a solemn row to be answerable

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