The Art of Public Speaking

Capa
Cosimo, Inc., 1 de nov. de 2007 - 528 páginas
The best way to become a confident, effective public speaker, according to the authors of this landmark book, is simply to do it. Practice, practice, practice. And while you're at it, assume the positive. Have something to say. Forget the self. Cast out fear. Be absorbed by your subject. And most importantly, expect success. "If you believe you will fail," they write, "there is hope for you. You will." DALE CARNEGIE (1888-1955), a pioneer in public speaking and personality development, gained fame by teaching others how to become successful. His book How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936) has sold more than 10 million copies. He also founded the Dale Carnegie Institute for Effective Speaking and Human Relations, with branches all over the world. JOSEPH BERG ESENWEIN (1867-1946) also wrote The Art of Story-Writing, Writing the Photoplay (with Arthur Leeds), and Children's Stories and How to Tell Them.

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Comentário do usuário  - ari.joki - LibraryThing

Mildly interesting and somewhat instructive. Feels dated, but has still some validity. Ler resenha completa

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Página 112 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?
Página 111 - What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted ? Let us not, I beseech you, Sir, deceive ourselves longer. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned — we have remonstrated — we have supplicated — we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition, to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and parliament.
Página 272 - Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate...
Página 141 - I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make a sudden sally, And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley.
Página 111 - Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation ? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love ? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir.
Página 112 - Peace, peace! — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the North will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish ? What would they have ? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery ? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me...
Página 50 - It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us...
Página 110 - Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and to provide for it.
Página 137 - Haste thee nymph and bring with thee Jest and youthful jollity, Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles, Nods, and becks, and wreathed smiles. Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek; Sport that wrinkled care derides. And laughter holding both his sides. Come, and trip it as ye go On the light fantastic toe...
Página 137 - To hear the lark begin his flight, And singing startle the dull night, From his watch-tower in the skies, Till the dappled dawn doth rise; Then to come, in spite of sorrow, And at my window bid good-morrow, Through the sweet-brier, or the vine, Or the twisted eglantine.

Sobre o autor (2007)

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (spelled Carnagey until 1922) was born on November 24, 1888 in Maryville, Missouri. He was the son of a poor farmer but he managed to get an education at the State Teacher's College in Warrensburg. After school he became a successful salesman and then began pursuing his dream of becoming a lecturer. At one point, he lived, penniless, at the YMCA on 125th street in New York City. There he persuaded the "Y" manager to allow him to give courses on public speaking. His technique included making students speak about something that made them angry -- this technique made them unafraid to address an audience. From this beginning, the Dale Carnegie Course developed. (Dale also changed the spelling of his last name from Carnagey to Carnegie due to the widely recognized name of Andrew Carnegie.) Carnegie wrote Public Speaking: a Practical Course for Business Men (1926), but his greatest written achievement was How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936). The book has still made it on to the bestsellers' list in 2014. Carnegie died at his home in Forest Hills, New York on November 1, 1955. He was buried in the Belton, Cass County, Missouri, cemetery. The official biography from Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc. states that he died of Hodgkin's disease.

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