The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution. With Extracts from His Correspondence, State Papers, and Political Essays, Band 1

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Little, Brown,, 1865 - 536 Seiten
 

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Seite 107 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Seite 106 - Taxation is no part of the governing or legislative power. The taxes are a voluntary gift and grant of the Commons alone.
Seite 106 - A great deal has been said without doors, of the power, of the strength of America. It is a topic that ought to be cautiously meddled with. In a good cause, on a sound bottom, the force of this country can crush America to atoms.
Seite 406 - ... not for the good of those who are under it, but for his own private, separate advantage. When the governor, however entitled, makes not the law, but his will, the rule, and his commands and actions are not directed to the preservation of the properties of his people, but the satisfaction of his own ambition, revenge, covetousness, or any other irregular passion.
Seite 280 - An Appeal to the World; or a Vindication of the Town of Boston, from Many false and malicious Aspersions contained In certain Letters and Memorials, written by Governor Bernard, General Gage, Commodore Hood, the Commissioners of the American Board of Customs, and others, and by them respectively transmitted to the British Ministry.
Seite 428 - Nor can any edict of anybody else, in what form soever conceived, or by what power soever backed, have the force and obligation of a law which has not its sanction from that legislative which the public has chosen and appointed...
Seite 53 - ... on many occasions has caused the blood of those sons of liberty to recoil within them; men promoted to the highest seats of justice, some who, to my knowledge, were glad by going to a foreign country to escape being brought to the bar of a court of justice in their own. They protected by your arms ! They have nobly taken up arms in your defence...
Seite 428 - God hath over all: and by the natural law, whereunto he hath made all subject, the lawful power of making laws to command whole politic societies of men belongeth so properly unto the same entire societies, that for any prince or potentate of what kind soever upon earth to exercise the same of himself, and not either by express commission immediately and personally received from God, or else by authority derived at the first from their consent upon whose persons they impose laws, it is no better...
Seite 93 - I do not mean to impeach the right of the Parliament of Great Britain to make laws for the trade of Ireland. I only speak of what laws it is right for Parliament to make.
Seite 100 - House. I would fain know by whom an American is represented here ? Is he represented by any knight of the shire, in any county in this kingdom ? Would to God that respectable representation was augmented to a greater number ! Or will you tell him that he is represented by any representative of a borough — a borough which, perhaps, its own representatives never saw ? This is what is called ' the rotten part of the constitution.

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