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Reusner, 394 ; Junius and Whitney, 395 ;

Shakespeare, 396. Note in Knight, 396.
Pembroke, earl of, dedication to, 1668, p.

122.
Pericles, accepted as of Shakespeare's au-

thorship, 156, 157, 158; the triumph-
scene, 158; First knight, Lux tua vita
mihi, 160—162 ; Second knight, Piu
por dulzura que por fuerza, 162–167;
Third knight, Me pompæ provexit apex,
168--170 ; Fourth knight, Quod me alit,
me extinguit, 170-175; Fifth knight,
Sic spectanda fides, 175–181; Sixth

knight, in hac spe vivo, 181– 186.
Personification, especially in mythology, 258.
Perth, earl of, Emblems in a letter to,

124, note,
Phaeton, Ovid, 284; Alciat, 285 ; Sy-

meoni, 284 ; Shakespeare, 286, 287.
Philip, duke of Burgundy, 1429, Golden

fleece, 228.
Phænix, emblem for long life; for return-

ing to friends; restoration after long
ages, 23; Oneliness or loneliness, 235,
236 ; Accounts of, 22, 23, 234—236;
Phoenix' nest, 380; Emblem of loneliness,
Paradin, Giovio, 234, 235; Shakespeare,
236 ; Emblem of duration, Horapollo,
23; Emblem of new birth, and resur-
rection, Freitag, 381 ; Mary of Lorraine,
123; Emblem of oneliness, Paradin and
Reusner, 385; Whitney, 387; Shake-
speare, 388—390 ; Emblem of life

eternal, 386.
Phænix with two hearts, Hawkins, 383;

the Virgin mother and her son, entire one-

ness of affection, 384 ; Shakespeare, 384.
Phryxus, or Phrixus, 229. See Golden

Fleece,
Picture writing, 18, 30.
Picture and short poesie, marks of the

Emblem, 31.
Pilgrim travelling, Cullum's Hawsted, 128.
Pine-trees in a storm, Horace, Sambucus,

475; Whitney, 476 ; Shakespeare, 477.
Plate, of emblematical character, 20.
Pleasant vices, their punishment, 425.
Poetic ideas, emblems for, 377–410 ;

Shakespeare's splendid symbolical ima-
gery, 377; Glory of poets, 379, 380; The

phoenix, 381-383 ; Phoenix with two
hearts, 384 ; The bird always alone, 384
-390; Kingfisher, 391–393; Pelican,
393-398; Wounded stag, 397-400 ;
Golden, the epithet, 400 ; Death and
Love, 404, 405; Cupid in mid-air, 404;
Human life a theatre, 405, 406; Seven

ages of life, 407-410.
Poet's badge, Alciat, 218; Whitney, 217;

Shakespeare, 219.
Poet's glory, 379 ; Le Bey de Batilly, 380;

Shakespeare, 380.
Politics in emblems, Il Principe, 34.
Porcupine, Drummond, 124; Giovio, 231 ;

Camerarius, Shakespeare, 232.
Portcullis, emblem used by Henry VIII.,

1 24.
Powers granted for noble purposes, Whit-

ney, Shakespeare, 412.
Printing with blocks, 45-49; with move-

able types, 50.
Progne or Procne, Aneau, Shakespeare,

193.
Prometheus bound, Alciat, 266; Aneau,

267 ; Microcosme, 267; Reusner, Whit-

ney, 268; Shakespeare, 268, 269.
Proverbs, Emblems in connection with,

318—345:- Proverbs suggestive of nar-
rative or picture, 318; La fin couronne
les æuvres, 320—322 ; Manie droppes
pierce the stone, &c., 324; To clip the
anvil of my sword, 325—327; Jove laughs
at lovers' perjuries, 328, 329 ; Labour in
vain, 329-332 ; Every rose its thorn,
332–334 ; True as the needle to the pole,
334-337 ; Out of greatest least, 337—
339 ; A snake in the grass, 340, 341 ;
Who against us ? 342, 343 ; Hoist with

his own petar, 343, 344.
Providence, and girdle, 413 (see Drake's

ship); Making poor and enriching, Plate

XVI., 489.
Pyramid and ivy, Drummond, 124.

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Q.
1. Quadrins historiques de la Bible, 1553–

1583, twenty-two editions in various lan-
guages, 73.

Quadrins historiques du Genèse, 1553, p. 73.
Quadrins historiques de l'Exode, 1553, p. 73.

ende, 320 ; Renovata juventus, 369; Res
humane in summo declinant, 435 ; Re-
spice et prospice, 139; Rompe ch' il percote,
125; Rore madet vellus, Permansit arida
tellus, 47 ; Rota vite que septima notatur,
407.

3. Rapin, History of England, 1724, p.

I 22.

2. Quæ ante pedes? 411 ; Quæ sequimur
fugimus, nosque fugiunt, 466; Qua supra
nos, nihil ad nos, 260 ; Quel che nutre,
estingue, 175 ; Que mas puede la elo-
quencia que la fortaliza, 164 ; Quem nulla
pericula terrent, 347 ; Quibus rebus con-
fidimus, iis maxime evertimus, 344 ;
Quid nisi victis dolor, 124 ; Qui me alit,
me extinguit, 171-173; Quis contra nos ?
126, 342 ; Quod in te est, prome, 395 ;
Quod me alit, me extinguit, 170, 174 ;
Quod nutrit extinguit, 174 ; Quod sis esse
velis, 312 ; Quo modo vitam ? 456 ; Quo
pacto mortem seu hominis exitum ? 454 ;
Quo tendis ? 128.

Redl museo Borbonico, 1824, p. 19.
Reusner, quoted:-Circe, 251 ; Hares and

dead lion, 306; Man a god to man,
283 ; Orpheus and harp, 272; Pegasus,
143 ; Pelican and young, 394 ; Phænix,
385; Prometheus, 268; Serpent and
countryman, 197 ; Sirens, 252; Swan,

215, 216; Unicorn, 371.
Roscoe, Leo X., 303.

3. Quarles, definition of Emblem, i.
Quinctilian, use of the word Emblem, 5.

4. Qui or quod, variations in the reading,

174.

R.

R, 0. L., Nef des folz, xlix., Paris, 1499, p.

411 ; 0. L., of uncertain origin, p. 531.

1. Rabelais, Les songes drolatiques de Pan.

tagruel, 1565, p. 86.
Rastall, Dialogue of creatures, 1520, p. 51.
Regiomontanus, or Muller, 1476, p. 42.
Regiselmus. See Joachim.
Reusner, Emblemata, 1581, Aureolorum

Emblem., 1591, pp. 88, 89, 251.
Rime de gli academici occulti, 1568, p. 86.
Rinaldi, Il mostruosissimo, 1588, p. 87.
Ripa, Iconologia, &c., 1603, 1613, p. 92.
Riviere, Nef des folz du monde, before

1500, p. 57
Rollenhagen, Les emblemes, 161, p. 95 ;

Nucleus Emblematum, 1613, p. 97.
Ruscelli, Discorso, 1556, p. 77 ; Imprese

illustri, 1566, p. 78.
Rüxner, Turnier-buch, 1530, p. 68.

4. Recapitulation and conclusions, 492–

495.
References and coincidences not purely

accidental, 494.
References to passages from Shakespeare,

in the order of the plays and poems, and
to the corresponding devices and subjects

of the Emblems, Appendix iii., 531-542.
Rhetoric, chambers of, their pursuits and

amusements, 81, 82; Extent and nature,

82.
Rich and poor, Plate XVI., 489.
Rock in waves, Drummond, 125, note.
Romano, Julio, works known to Shake-

speare, 110; Where there are now works

of his, no, III.
Romano, Capitano Girolamo Mattei, 233.
Rose and thorn, Whitney, Perriere, 333 ;

Vænius, 333; Shakespeare, 334.
Rubens, desciple of Vænius, 96.
Rudolph II., 85, 89, 96.
Ruins and writings, Whitney and Costalius,

444 ; Shakespeare, 444, 445, Boissard,
449.

S.

S, O. L., Giovio's Sent. Imp. 3, Lyons,

1562, pp. 156, 515; 0. L., Sambucus
(Emb. 232), Antverp., 1564, p. 302.

2. Rabie succensa, 356; Remember still thy

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imago & exitus, 53; Scribit in marmore
læsus, 457, 458; Scripta manent, 443;
Servati gratia avis, 224; Sibi canit et
orbi, 217 ; Sic majora cedunt, 366 ; Sic
spectanda fides, 159, 175, 178; Si Deus
nobiscum, quis contra nos ? 342 ; Si for-
tuna me tormenta, il sperare me con-
tenta, 137, 138; Si fortune me tourmente,
l'esperance me contente, 138 ; Silentium,
208; Sine justitia confusio, 449, 450 ;
Sola facta, solum Deum sequor, 234 ;
Sol animi virtus, 161; Sola vivit in illo,
126; Speravi et perii, 130 ; Spes altera
vitæ, 183, 184; Spes aulica, 182; Spes
certa, 182 ; Spiritus durissima coquit,
233 ; Stultitia sua scipsum saginari, 310;
Stultorum infinitus est, 66; Superbia,
292; Superbiæ vltio, 293.

pp. 71, 88.

Sassus, referred to by Menestrier, 79.
Sceve, Delie, 1544, p. 75.
Schopperus, Navonlía, 1568, and De omni-

bus illiberalibus sive mechanicis artibus,

1574, p. 88.

Schrot, Wappenbuch, 1581, p. 90.
Scribonius, 1550. See Graphæus.
Sevus, referred to by Menestrier, 79.
Shyp of fooles. See Watson and Barclay.
Sicile, Le blason de toutes armes, and Le

blason des couleurs, 1495, p. 58.
Simulachres & historiees faces de la mort,

1538, p. 71; Fifteen editions, 72, 471.
Soto. See De Soto.
S. (P.), Heroical devices, 1591, pp. 75, 120.
Spanish Emblem-books, passim, and, 70,

90, 99.
Speculum humanæ salvationis, MS., printed

about 1430 by Koster, 43 ; Description
of his edition, 43; Many editions and
kindred works before 1500, p. 43; Plates

IV. and V., 44.
Spelen van sinne, allegorical plays, 1539,

P. 81.

Stam und wapenbuch, 1579, p. 31.
Stimmer, Neue kunstliche figuren Biblischen,

1576, p. 90.
Stockhamer, commentariola to Alciat,

1556, p. 70.
Stultifera navis, previous to 1500, Locher,

Riviere, Plate IX., 57 ; Other versions,

57 ; Badius, 61.
Symeoni, Vita et Met. d'Ovid., 1559, PP. 3,

35, 79; Devises ou emblemes heroiques et
morales, 1561, pp. 15, 16; Imprese,
1574, p. 17 ; Imprese heroiche et morale,
1562, p. 78; Sententiose imprese, 1562,

3. Sadeler, Zodiacus christianus, 1618,

p. 353.
Sambucus, quoted :-Actæon, 277; Astro-

nomer, 335; Ban-dog, 482 ; Child and
motley fool, 484 ; Elephant, 196; Fore-
head, 129; Hen eating her own eggs,
411; Laurel, 422; Mercury and lute,
256 ; Pine-trees in a storm, 475 ; Ship
on the waves, 435; Time flying, 466 ;

Timon, 427 ; World, map of, 351.
Schiller, Werke, 199.
Schlegel, on Pericles, 157.
Shakespeare quoted, by way of allusion, or

of reference to :-Æsop's Fables, 303 ;
Actæon, 276, 279 ; Adam hiding, 416 ;
Adamant, 348; Æneas and Anchises,
191 ; Ape and miser's gold, 488; Apollo
and the Christian muse, 379; Argonauts
and Jason, 230 ; Arion, 283 ; Astrono-
mer and magnet, 356; Atlas, 245,
Bacchus, 249 ; Ban-dog, 484 ; Bear and
ragged staff, 237–240 ; Bear and cub,
349, 350 ; Bees, 361–365; Bellero-
phon and chimæra, 300; Brutus, 201—
205; Butterfly and candle, 153 ; Cad-
mus, 245; Cannon bursting, 345 ;
Casket scenes, 149–154, 186 ; Cassius
and Cæsar, 193; Chaos, 451 — 453 ;
Child and motley fool, 485; Chivalry,
wreath of, 168 ; Circe, 252 ; Cliffords,
192 ; Clip the anvil of my sword, 327;

p. 78.

2. Sa virtu m'attire, 123 ; Scelesti hominis

Commonwealth of Bees, 362 — 365;
Conscience, power of, 421 ; Coriolanus,
201 ; and his civic crowns, 226; Coro-
nation scene, 9; Countryman and ser.
pent, 197 ; Cupid blinded, 331 ; Cupid
in mid-air, 404; Daphne, 297; Death,
469; Dog baying the moon, 269; Dogs
not praised, 145, 483 ; D. 0. M., 464,
465; Drake's ship, 415; Drinking bout
of Antony and his friends, 246 ; Drops
pierce the stone, 324 ; Dust, to write in,
461 ; Eagle renewing its youth, 369 ;
Elizabeth, queen, 404; Elm and vine,
309; Emblem defined, 9; Emblems
without device, 149--151; End crowns
all, 320, 323; Engineer hoist, 345 ;
Envy, 433; Estridge, 371 ; Eternity,
491, 492; Falconry, 367, 368; Fame
armed with

a pen, 445, 446; Fin
couronne les œuvres, 320-323; Fortune,
262 ; Fox and grapes, 311; Frosty
Caucasus, 346 ; Gem in a ring, 419;
Golden, 400, 404 ; Gold on the touch-
stone, 175, 180; Golden Fleece, 227 ;
Good out of evil, 447 ; Greatest out of
least, 337–339; Hands of Providence,
489, 490 ; Happe some goulden honie
bringes, 365 ; Hares and dead lion,
304; Hen eating her own eggs, 412 ;
Heraldry, 222, 223; Homo homini lupus,
280, 283; Homo homini Deus, 283,
284 ; Hydra, 375; Icarus, 291 ; Inver-
ted torch, 170; Jackdaw in fine feathers,
313; Janus, two-headed, 140 ; Jupiter
and Io, 246 ; Jove laughs at lovers'
perjuries, 328 ; King-fisher, 392 ; Labour
in vain, 331, 332 ; Lamp burning, 456;
Laurel, 422—425; Lottery, 209–211;
Love's transforming power, 349 ; Man
with a fardel or burden, 481 ; Man's
greatness, 284 ; Map of the world, 351,
352 ; Medeia, 192; Mercury, 257, 258;
Michael, order of St., 227; Milo, 297 ;
Narcissus, 296; Niobe, 293, 294; Oak
and reed, 315, 316 ; Occasion, or oppor-
tunity, 260, 264, 265; Old Time, 473;
Orpheus, 273, 274; Ostrich, 234, 371 ;
Pegasus, 299, 300; Pelican, 394—397 ;
Pen, its eternal glory, 447 ; Pericles,
the triumph scene, 158, 160 -- 186;

Phaeton, 286, 287; Phænix, 236, 381–
390; Pine-trees, 477; Poet's badge,
218, 219; Poet's glory, 379, 380 ;
Porcupine, 232 ; Powers granted for
noble purposes, 412; Progne, 194 ;
Prometheus bound, 268; Romano, Julio,
110; Ruins and writings, 443–445 ;
Rose and thorn, 333, 334; Serpent in
the breast, 198; Seven ages of man,
407-410; Shadows fled and pursued,
468 ; Ship in storm and calm, 435—440 ;
Sirens, 254 ; Skull, human, 337–339 ;
Snake in the grass, 341 ; Snake on the
finger, 343 ; Stag wounded, 397—400;
Student entangled in love, 441; Sun
and wind, 160; The setting sun, 323 ;
The swan, 219; Sword on an anvil, 327;
Sword with a motto, 138; Testing of
gold, 175, 180, 181; Theatre of life,
405, 406; Things at our feet, 411, 412;
Thread of lise, 454 ; Time leading the
seasons, 491 ; Timon, 427-431 ; Tur-
key and cock, 357, 358; Unicorn, 371,
372 ; Vine and olive, 249; Whitney's
dedication lines, 464 ; Wreath of chiv-
alry, 168; Wreaths, 222; Wreath of
oak, 225; Wrongs on marble, 457–

462; Zodiac, signs of, 353.
Shakespeare, acquainted with languages,

106, 107, 168; with the works of
Julio Romano, 110 ; and of Titian, 115;
with Emblems, 137, 158, 186.-Attain-
ments, 106—116; sufficient for cultiva-
ting Emblem literature, 107, 108. -
Dramatic cereer, 1590—1615, pp. 91,92 ;
An Emblem writer, 148, 154, 493 ;
Genius, 105; Judgment in works of art, -
sculpture, 109, 110; ornament, il;
painting, 112-115; melody and song,
115, 116. —Knowledge of ancient history
and customs, 105, 106, 225, 226 ; Marks
of reading and thought, 242; Tendency
to depreciate his attainments, 105; Use of

term Symbol, 2; Device, 8; Emblem, 9.
Shepheard's calender, Spenser, 134-137,

185.
Siegenbeek, Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche

letterkunde, 82.
Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman

Antiquities, 10.

Sotheby, Principia typographica, 1858,

pp. 48, 49.
Spenser, ideas of devices, 8; Early sonnets,

88; Visions, 134; Shepheards calender,

134, 136, 185; Ban-dogs, 481.
Stamm Buch, 1619, Adam hiding, 416.
Statius, badges, 47.
Suetonius, Tiber. Cæsaris vita, 5.
Symbola divina et humana, 1652, p. 176.
Symeoni, quoted :-Ape and miser's gold,

486 ; Butterfly and candle, 153 ; Chaos,
448 ; Creation and confusion, 35;
Diana, 3; Dolphin and anchor, 16;
Forehead shows the man, 129; Inverted
torch, 171; Phaeton, 284; Serpent's
teeth, 245 ; Wounded stag, 398 ; Wrongs

on marble, 457.
Syntagma de symbolis, 2.

4. Saint Germain, fair at, imprese, 124,

note.

Salamander, impresa of Francis I., 123, 125.
Satan, fall of, Boissard, 1596, Plate XI.,

132, 133.
Satire in Emblems, 33.
Saviour's adoption of a human soul, Vænius,

Plate 11., 32.
Savoy, duke of, his impresa, 124 ;

Madame Bona of, her device, 235.
Sepulchre and cross, Diana of Poitiers, 183.
Serpent and countryman, Freitag, Reusner,

197 ; Serpent in the bosom, Shakespeare,

198.
Seven ages of man, Arundel MS., 406 ;

Hippocrates, Proclus, Antonio Federighi,
Martin, Lady Calcott, 407 ; Block-print
described, Plate XV., 407, 408 ; Shake-

speare, 409, 410.
Shadow, fled and pursued, Whitney, 467;

Shakespeare, 468.
Shield untrustworthy. See Brasidas.
Shields of Achilles, Hercules, Æneas, &c.,

Silent academy at Hamadan, 17.
Silversmiths, their craft and emblems, 20.
Similitudes and identities in literature, 302.
Sinon, 194—200 ; Virgil, 194 ; Whitney,

195, 196, 199 ; Shakespeare, 200.
Sirens, Alciat, 253; Whitney, 254 ;

Shakespeare, 254.
Six direct references to Emblems in the

Pericles of Shakespeare, 156—186.
Skiff of foolish tasting, Badius, 1502, p. 61.
Skull, human, Aneau, Whitney, 337 ;

Shakespeare, 338, 339.
Snake in the grass, Paradin, Whitney, 340 ;

Shakespeare, 341.
Snake on the finger, Paradin, 342; Whitney,

Shakespeare, 343.
Soul, its hieroglyphic sign, 25, 26.
Spanish motto, 162, 164, 167.
Speculum humance salvationis, Plates IV.

and V., 44.
Stag wounded, Giovio and Symeoni, 398;

Paradin, Camerarius, Virgil, Ovid,

Vænius, 399; Shakespeare, 399, 400.
Stage, the world a, 409. See Seven ages.
Star, its hieroglyphic meaning, 25.
Statuary and architecture excluded, 11.
Stirling-Maxwell, Bart., of Keir, De Bry's

Stam und wapenbuch, 1593, p. 32 ;
MIKPOKOZMOX, by Costerius, 98. See

also Keir.
Stork, emblem of filial piety, &c., 28;

Epiphanius and Alciat, 28.
Student in love, Alciat, Whitney, 441;

Shakespeare, 442.
Subjects of the Emblem Imprese, &c., 515

-530.
Sun and moon, in dialogue, 52.
Sun of York, 223; Sun in eclipse, 124;

Sun setting, Whitney, 323; Sun, wind,
and traveller, Corrozet, 165; Freitag,

Shakespeare, 166.
Swan singing at death, Æschylus, Hora-

pollo, 213 ; Virgil, Horace, 214; Old
age eloquent, Aneau, 215; Pure truth,
Reusner, 216; Camerarius, 217; Insignia
of Poets, Alciat, Whitney, 218; Shake-

speare, 219, 220.
Sword with motto, 138.
Sword on anvil, Perriere, 326 ; Whitney,

327 ; Shakespeare, 325, 327.

20.

Ship, with mast overboard, Drummond,

124 ; Ship on the sea, Drummond, 125 ;
Ship tossed by the waves, Sambucus,
Whitney, 435 ; Ship sailing forward,
Whitney, Alciat, 436 ; Boissard, 437 ;

Shakespeare, 438-440.
Sieve held by Cupid, 340. See Cupid.

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