Sketches of the Fair Sex, in All Parts of the World: To which are Added Rules for Determining the Precise Figure, the Degree of Beauty, the Habits, and the Age of Women, Notwithstanding the Aids and Disguises of Dress

Capa
T. Abbot, 1841 - 216 páginas
 

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Página 136 - Hail, wedded love, mysterious law, true source Of human offspring, sole propriety In Paradise, of all things common else. By thee adulterous lust was driven from men, Among the bestial herds to range; by thee, Founded in reason, loyal, just, and pure, Relations dear, and all the charities Of father, son, and brother, first were known.
Página 6 - She who ne'er answers till a husband cools, Or, if she rules him, never shows she rules; Charms by accepting, by submitting sways, Yet has her humour most when she obeys...
Página 58 - Whose bright succession decks the varied year; Whatever sweets salute the northern sky With vernal lives, that blossom but to die; These here disporting own the kindred soil, Nor ask luxuriance from the planter's toil; While sea-born gales their gelid wings expand To winnow fragrance round the smiling land.
Página 103 - The vexatious life arises from a conjunction of two people of quick taste and resentment, put together for reasons well known to their friends, in which especial care is taken to avoid (what they think the chief of evils) poverty, and ensure to them riches, with every evil besides. These good people live in a constant constraint before company, and too great familiarity alone.
Página 57 - Whatever fruits in different climes are found, That proudly rise, or humbly court the ground ; Whatever blooms in torrid tracts appear, Whose bright succession decks the varied year ; Whatever sweets salute the northern sky With vernal lives, that blossom but to die ; These here disporting own the kindred soil, Nor ask...
Página 213 - O, why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest heaven With spirits masculine, create at last This novelty on earth, this fair defect Of Nature, and not fill the world at once With men as angels without feminine, Or find some other way to generate Mankind...
Página 58 - To winnow fragrance round the smiling land. But small the bliss that sense alone bestows, And sensual bliss is all the nation knows. In florid beauty groves and fields appear ; Man seems the only growth that dwindles here. Contrasted faults through all his manners reign : Though poor, luxurious ; though submissive, vain ^ Though grave, yet trifling ; zealous, yet untrue ; And e'en in penance planning sins anew.
Página 103 - The marriage life is always an insipid, a vexatious, or a happy condition. The first is, when two people of no genius or taste for themselves meet together, upon such a settlement as has been thought reasonable by parents and conveyancers, from an exact valuation of the land and cash of both parties. In this case the young lady's person is no more regarded than the house and the improvements in purchase of an estate ; but she goes with her fortune, rather than her fortune with her.
Página 136 - Here love his golden shafts employs, here lights His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings, Reigns here and revels...
Página 58 - While nought remain'd of all that riches gave, But towns unmann'd, and lords without a slave — And late the nation found, with fruitless skill, Its former strength was but plethoric ill. Yet, still the loss of wealth is here supplied By arts, the splendid wrecks of former pride : From these the feeble heart and long-fallen mind An easy compensation seem to find.

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