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relation to each other, introduced in the manner and form in which this had been. The gentleman from Adams (Mr. STEVENS) had made a great outcry about the extraordinary expenses of the Convention, which was. calculated to excite alarm, among the people, and induce the belief, that the Convention were doing nothing. Now that gentleman had been a member of the Legislature of the State, and that body, had, on one occasion, sat five months, at an expense equally as great as this Convention was incuring, and had done less, and perhaps, sometimes much worse than we had done, but the gentleman did not then complain of the time wasted, or the expense. He (Mr. Brown) looked upon this cry of expense, as he did upon all that gentleman's speeches, as merely intended for effect out of doors.

Mr. Bell, of Chester, rose to a question of order.
Mr. READ, of Susquehanna, moved the previous question.

Mr FORWARD, of Allegheny, wished to make a few explanatory remarks.

Mr. M’DOWELL hoped, that the gentleman from Susquehanna would withdraw his motion.

Mr. Read then withdrew his motion, and moved that the committee rise. Lost.

A division being demanded, there appeared ayes, 39: noes, upwards of 40.

Mr. FORWARD remarked, that if the amendment now offered was out of place, let it be disposed of. But, if it was in place, it ought to be examin ed, and discussed. He wished to vote for the principal amendment. He would not say, that he would include all the officers named in the amend. ment, but a portion of them. And, if it was proper to receive it now, it was necessary, in order to act understandingly

Mr. EARLE, of Philadelphia, hoped that a different course would be adopted.

Mr. HAYHURST, of Columbia, rose to a question of order.
The Chair said, that the gentleman (Mr. EARLE) was out of order.

Mr. EARLE remarked, that he was decidedly in favor of the general principle of the amendment of the gentleman from Adams, for extending the election of these officers to the people. It seemed, however, that we could not get a vote here on a question, but what the previous question was called. The gentleman (Mr. Stevens) had tauntingly told us, that he would make us swallow every thing, that he choose to give us.

Mr. STEVENS : (interrupted) 'The gentleman has misunderstood me. I did not make use of any such language.

Mr. EARLE : We have been tauntingly told

Mr. STEVENS: (interrupted) the gentleman is bound to take my explar nation by law

Mr. EARLE : The gentleman said, that if we did not vote for a particuJar thing, the people would take us as voting against giving them the election of these officers

Mr. Read here intimated, that he would renew his call for the previous question.

Mr. CLARKE, of Indiana, demanded the previous question, which was

The question then recuring was, "shall the main question be now

put?

Mr. DUNLOP asked for the

yeas
and

nays.
And, the question being taken, was decided as follows :

Yuas-Messrs. Banks, Barclay, Barndollar, Bayne, Bell, Bigelow, Bonham, Browl, of Philadelphia, Butler, Clarke, of Beaver, Clarke, of Indiana, Cleavinger, Crain, Cummin, Curll, Darrah, Dillinger, Donnell, Earle, Farrelly, Fleming, Foulkrod, Fry, Fuller, Gamble, Gearhart, Gilmore, Grenell, Hastings, Hayhurst, Helfenstein, Hiester, Houpt, Hyde, Keim, Kennedy, Konigmacher, Krebs, Maclay, Magee, Mann, M'Dowell, Merkel, Miller, Montgomery, Myers, Nevin, Overfield, Porter, of Northampton, Purviance, Read, Riter, Ritter, Rogers, Saeger, Sellers, Scheetz, Shellito, Smith, Smyth, Sterigere, Swetland, Taggart-63.

Nays-Messrs. Agnew, Baldwin, Barnitz, Carey, Chambers, Chandler, of ChesterChauncey, Clark, of Dauphin, Cochran, Craig, Crum, Darlington, Denny, Dickey, Dick, erson, Dunlop, Forward, Henderson, of Allegheny, Hopkinson, Jenks, Kerr, M'Call, M'Sherry, Meredith, Merrill, Pollock, Royer, Russell, Scott, Serrill, Sill, Snively, Stevens, Thomas, Todd, Woodward, Young, Sergeant, President—38.

So, the main question was ordered to be put, and being taken, the report of the committee, so far as it related to the second section, and as amended, was agreed to.

The committee rose, reported progress, and obtained leave to sit again, and,

The Convention adjourned.

MONDAY, JULY 3.

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Mr. CHANDLER, of Chester, presented three memorials from citizens of Cumberland county, praying that the right of trial by jury be extended to every human being,

Mr. CHANDLER also presented two similar petitions from the citizens of Chester county.

Mr. MERKEL, of Cumberland, presented a similar petition from citizens of Pennsylvania.

Mr. M'CALL, of Washington, presented a similar petition from citizens of Washington county.

These petitions were all laid on the table.

Mr. PORTER, of Northampton, presented the following resolution, which was laid on the table, and ordered to be printed:

Resolved, That the committee of the whole be discharged from the further consideration of the amendments to the Constitution, and that the following amendments of the Constitution of Pennsylvania be and the same are hereby submitted to a vote of the people, pursuant to the act entitled, “ An act to provide for calling a Convention with limited powers.

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF PENNSYLVANIA.

IN ARTICLE I. Section 2. To read as follows: The representatives shall be chosen annually by the citizens of the city of Philadelphia, and of each county respectively, on the third Tuesday of October.

Sect. 3. To read as follows: No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one years, and have been a citizen and inhabitant of the State three years next preceding his election, and the last year thereof an inhabitant of the city

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ner,

or county in which he shall be chosen, unless he shall have been absent on the public bu. siness of the United States, or of this State, or unless he shall previously have been a qualified elector in this State, in which ease he shall be eligible upon one year's residence. No person residing within any city, town, or borough, which shall be entitled to a separate representation, shall be elected a member for any county, nor shall any person residing without the limits of any such city, town, or borough, be elected a member thereof.

Sect. 4. To read as follows: In the year eighteen hundred and forty-two, and within every subsequent term of seven years, an enumeration of the taxable inhabitants shall be made, in such manner as shall be directed by law. The number of representatives shall, at the several periods of making such enumeration, be fixed by the Legislature, and apportioned among the city of Philadelphia and the several counties, according to the number of taxable inhabitants in each, and shall never be less than sixty, nor greater than one hundred.

Sect. 5. To read as follows: l'he senators shall be chosen for three years by the citizens of Philadelphia, and of the several counties, at the same time, in the same man

and at the same places, where they shall vote for representatives. SECT. 7. To read as follows: The senators shall be chosen in districts to be formed by the Legislature, each district containing such a number of taxable inhabitants as shall be entitled to elect not more than two senators, unless u single city or county shall at any time be entitled to more than two. When a district shall be composed of two or more counties, they shall be adjoining. Neither the city nor any county shall be divided in forming a district..

SECT. 8. To read as follows: No person shall be a senator who shall not have attain. ed the age of twenty-five years, and have been a citizen and inhabitant of the State four years next before his election, and the last year thereof an inhabitant of the district for which he shall be chosen, unless he shall have been absent on the public business of the United States, or of this State, or unless he shall previously have been a qualified elector in this State, in which case he shall be eligible upon one year's residence.

Sect. 10. To read as follows: The General Assembly shall meet on the first Tuesday in January, unless sooner convened by the Governor.

Sect. 11. To read as follows: Each house shall choose its Speaker and other officers. In case of the sickness or necessary absence of the Speaker of either house, a Speaker pro tempore may be chosen ; and the Senate shall also choose a Speaker pro tempore when the Speaker shall exercise the office of Governor.

IN ARTICLE II. Sect. 2. To read as follows: The Governor shall be chosen by the citizens of the Commonwealth at the times and places where they shall respectively vote for representatives. The returns of every election for Governor shall be sealed up and transmitted to the seat of Government, directed to the speaker of the Senate, who shall open and publish them in the presence of the members of both houses of the Legislature. The person having the highest number of votes shall be Governor, but if two or more shall be equal and highest in votes, one of them shall be chosen Governor by the joint vote of the members of both houses. Contested elections shall be determined by a committee to be selected from both houses of the Legislature, and formed and regulated in such manner as shall be directed by law,

Sect. 3. The Governor shall hold his office during three years from the third Tuesday of January next ensuing his election, and shall not be capable of serving more than six years in every term of nine years.

Sect. 8. To read as follows: He shall appoint all officers, whose offices are established by this Constitution, or shall be established by law, and whose appointments are not herein, or shall be by law otherwise, provided for. But no person shall be appointed to an office within any county, who shall not have been a citizen and inhabitant therein one year next before his appointment, if the county shall have been so long erected; but if it shall not have been so long erected, then, within the limits of the county or counties out of which it shall have been taken. No member of Congress from this state, nor any person holding or exercising any office of trust or profit under the United States, shall at the same time hold or exercise the office of Judge, Secretary, Treasurer or Prothonotary, Register of Wills, Recorder of Deeds, Sheriff,or any office in the state, to which a salary is by law annexed, or any office which the Legislature shall declare incompatible

Sect. 14. To read as follows: In case of the death or resignation of the Governor, or his removal from office, the Speaker of the Senate shall exercise the office of Governor until another Governor shall be duly qualified. But in such case, another Governor shall be chosen at the next annual election of representatives, unless such death, resignation, or removal shall occur within three calendar months immediately preceding such next annual election, in which case a Governor shall be chosen at the second succeeding annual election of representatives. If the trial of a contested election shall continue longer than the third Tuesday in January next ensuing the election of a Governor, the Gov. ernor of the last year, or the Speaker of the Senate who may be in the exercise of the executive authority, shall continue therein, until the determination of such contested election, and until a Governor shall be qualified as aforesaid.

Sect. 15. To read as follows: A secretary shall be appointed and commissioned by the Governor during his pleasure. He shall keep a fair register of all the official acts an 1 proceedings of the Governor, and shall, when required, lay the same, and all papers, minutes, and vouchers relative thereto, before either branch of the Legislature, and shall perform such other duties as shall be enjoined him by law.

IN Ant. III. Sect. 1. To read as follows: In elections hy the citizens, every freeman of the age of twenty-one years, having resided in the state one year next before the election, and within two years next before such election, paid a stute or county tax, which shall have been assessed at least ten days before the election, shall enjoy the rights of an elector: Provided, That freemen, citizens of the United States, between the ages of twenty-one and twenty-two years, and having resided in this State one year before the election shall be entitled to vote, although they shall not have paid taxes, and that freemen who have previonsly been qualified electors of this State, inay, if otherwise qualified, enjoy the rights of electors upon six months' residence in this State.

In Art. V. Sect. 1. To read as follows: The judicial power of this Commonwealth shall be vested in a Supreme court, in courts of Oyer, Terminer, and general jail delivery, in a court of Common Pleas, Orphans' court, Registers' court, and a court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace, or such other courts as may be established by law for each county, in justices of the peace, and in such other courts as the Legislature may from time to time establish,

Sect. %. To read as follows: The judges of the Supreme court shall hold their of fices during good behaviour ; and the President judges of the court of Common Pleas, and other judges required to be learned in the law, for the term of ten years, if they shall so long behave themselves well. But for any reasonable cause, which shall not be sufficient ground of impeachment, the Governor may remove any of them on the address of two thirds of each branch of the Legislature. The judges of the Supreme court, and the presidents of the several courts of Common Pleas, shall at stated times, receive for their services an adequate compensation to be fixed by law, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office; but they shall receive no fees or perquisites of office, nor hold any other office of profit under this Commonwealth.

Sect. 4. To read as follows: Until it shall be otherwise directed by law, the several courts of Common Pleas shall be established in the following manner: The citizens of each county, qualified to vote for representarives to the General Assembly, shall elect two associate judges, who shall be commissioned by the Governor, and who, during their continuance in office, shall reside in such county, and hold their offices for the term of five years, if they shall so long behave themselves well. The State shall be by law divided into circuits, containing one or more counties. A president shall be appointed to the courts in each circuit, who, during his continuance in office, shall reside therein. The president and judges, any two of whom shall be a quorum, shall compose

the

respective courts of Common Pleas.

Sect. 10. To read as follows: The citizens shall elect a competent number of justices of the peace, in such convenient districts in each county, as are or shall be directed by law. They shall be commissioned for the term of five years, but may be removed on conviction of misbehaviour in office, or of any infamous crime, or on the address of both Houses of the Legislature.

Ix Art. VI. Sect. 1. To read as follows: Sheriffs and coroners shall, at the times and places of election of representatives, be chosen by the citizens of each county. One

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person shall be chosen for each office, and shall be commissioned by the Govomnor. They shall hold their offices for three years, if they shall so long behave themselves well, and until a successor be duly qualified; but no person shall be twice chosen or appointed sheriff in any term of six years. Vacancies in either of the said offices shall be filled by a new appointment to be made by the Governor, to continue until the next general election, and until a successor shall be chosen and qualified as aforesaid. Prothonotaries and clerks of the several courts, (except the prothonotaries of the supreme court, who shall be appointed in the respective districts by the court, for the term of three years, if they shall so long behave themselves well, and are not removed by the court,) recorders of deeds and registers of wills, shall, at the times and places of election of representatives, be elected by the citizens of each county, or the districts over which the jurisdic. tion of said courts extends, and shall be commissioned by the Governor. They shall hold their offices for three years, if they shall so long behave themselves well, and until their successors shall be duly qualified. The Legislature shall designate by law, the number of persons in each county who shall hold said offices, and how many, and which of said offices shall be held by one person. Vacancies in any of the said offices shall be filled by an appointment to be made by the Governor, to continue until the next general election, and until a successor shall be elected and qualified as aforesaid.

Sect, 3. To read as follows: The freemen of this Commonwealth shall be armed and organized for its defence, when, and in such manner, as the Legislature shall by law direct.

The remaining sections of the existing article to be numbered 4, 5 and 6.

Art. 7. Sect. 1. To read as follows: The Legislature shall, as soon as conveniently may be, provide by taw, for the establishment of schools throughout the State in such manner that all children may be taught at the public expense.

Sect. 2. To read as follows: The arts and sciences shall be promoted in such institutions of learning as may be alike open to all the citizens of this Commonwealth.

Art. 9. Add the following sections, to be called sections 26, 27, 28, and number tho present section 26, number 29.

Sect. 26. No perpetual charter of incorporation shall be granted, except for religious, charitable, or literary purposes, nor shall any charter for other purposes exceed the duration of one hundred years.

Sect. 27. No charter of incorporation to be granted for banking purposes, or for dealing in money stocks, securities, or paper credits, shall exceed twenty years.

Sect. 28. The Legislature shall have no power to combine or unite in any one bill two or more distinct subjects or objects of Legislation, or any two or more distinct sppropriations, or appropriations to distinct or different objects, except appropriations to works exclusively belonging to, and carried on by the Commonwealth; and the object or subject matter of each bill or act, shall be distinctly stated in the title thereof.

ART. X. Any amendment or amendments to this Constitution may be proposed in the Senate or Assembly, and if the same shall be agreed to, by a majority of the members elected to each of the two Houses, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be eno tered on their journals, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall cause the same to be published as soon as practicable, in at least one newspaper in every county in which a newspaper shall be published; and if, in the Legislature next afterwards chosen, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by two thirds of all the members elected to each House, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall cause the same again to be published in manner aforesaid, and such proposed amendment or amendments shall be submited to the people at such time and manner, at least three months distant, as the Legislature shall prescribe and, if the people shall approve and ratify such amendment or amendments, by a majority of the qualified voters of this State, who shall vote thereon, such amendment or amendments shall become a part of the Constitution.

SCHEDULE. "That no inconvenience may arise from the alterations and amendments in the Constitution of this Commonwealth, and in order to carry the same into complete

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