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happen to become poor in the vicissitudes of fortune, and appear on the election ground without having paid taxes within two years, what would be his feelings if he should be told that he could not vote, because he had not contributed to the public taxes? He had not so learned democracy. He said that he had boen instructed to cut off no man's vote, who was honest and faithful to the Constitution, and he would not vote to exclude any man from the ballot boxes, who was qualified in mind and body for an elector, and possessing the requisites indicated and mentioned. "The principle contended against them is taxation, as giving the right to vote at elections by freemen, and he was opposed, both to the amendment and the amendment to the amendment. The gentleman from Beaver (Mr. Dicker) has taken the true ground that is to go for the amendment or proposition, which extends the right of suffrage on tax basis, as the choice of evils, reserving the right of correcting it afterwards. He (Mr. B.) would therefore vote for the proposition of the gentleman from Columbia, (Mr. HAYHURST) and if it should carry, then vote against the amendment as amended, or for it, as he might think most advisable for carrying out the views indicated and expressed by him. In conclusion, he wished not to be understood as desiring, that persons should be exempted from the payment of taxes in proportion to the estates or property which they possessed; but he objected to any, and all propositions which would, in any event, cause the honest and honorable poor man to lose his right to vote at elections, and for no other reason than “ because he had pot paid taxes”.

His motto was,

“ Where liberty dwells, there is my country”. Mr. PORTER, of Northampton, said, that the gentleman from Mifflin, (Mr. BANKS) and himself, would not be found to differ much when they understood each other. He (Mr. P.) had said, that he disliked the property qualification as much as the gentleman did. And, the injustice of it was never better illustrated than by Dr. FRANKLIN's story of the citizen and the Jackass, a man who had property in a Jackass, valued at 15, being entitled to vote, went to the polls and gave his vote accordingly.But, before the next election the ass died, and the man presented himself at the hustings, intending to give his vote. It was, however, refused. He asked for what reason? The reply was, because at the last election he had an ass, and now he had not. The man then enquired, which had the right of voting—he, or the animal ?

The question was taken on the amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative-yeas, 55; nays, 52—as follows:

Yuas—Mess's. Banks, Brown, of Northampton, Brown, of Philadelphia, Butler, Clarke, of Indiana, Cleavinger, Cochran, Cox, Crain, Cunningham, Curll, Darrah, Dunny, Dickey, Doran, Earle, Farrelly, Fleming, Foulkrod, Gamble, Gearhart, Gilmore, Grenell, Hastings, Hayhurst, Helffenstein, Hyde, Kennedy, Lyons, Magee, Mann, Mar. tin, M'Cahen, Merill, Miller, Myers, Overfield, Purviance, Reigart, Read, Riter, Ritter, Rogers, Royer, Sellers, Scheetz, Shellito, Smith, Smyth, Sterigere, Swetland, Taggart, Weaver, Woodward, Young-55.

Nare-Messrs. Agnew, Ayres, Barndollar, Barnitz, Bayne, Bell, Biddle, Bigelow, Brown, of Lancaster, Chambers, Chandler, of Chester, Chauncey, Clarke, of Beaver, Clark, of_Dauphin, Coates, Cope, Craig, Cruin, Cummin, Darlington, Dickerson, Dillinger, Forward, Fry, Henderson, of Allegheny, Henderson, of Dauphin, Hiester, Hopkinson, Houpt, Jenks, Kerr, Konigmacher, Long, Maclay, M'Call, M'Dowell, M'Sherry, Meredith, Merkel, Montgomery, Pollock, Porter, of Lancaster, Porter, of

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eral Government, in the shape of duties on the necessaries of life, and yet be deprived from voting for the officers of the General Government, while the man who paid a tax of twenty-five cents to an assessor, is allowed to vote. This tax qualification, in every respect, was unequal. The gentleman from Chester ought to carry out his principle, if it was a just one, and permit a man, who has paid a State tax, to vote only for State officers, and one who has paid a county tax, only for county officers. He should vote for the amendment as the most liberal, although he was opposed to any tax qualification.

Mr. HOPKINSON, of Philadelphta, said, that he would simply remind the committee of a great leading principle which had been frequently avowed on this floor. This principle was a determination to make no alteration in the Constitution, without good and substantial reasons. He wished to remind gentlemen of this principle in reference to the amendment pending. The gentleman from Columbia (Mr. Haywurst) submited a proposition, and after it had been discussed all the morning, had given it up, and submited another. Now, unless it could be shown that this was better than the other, it ought not to be entertained. He (Mr. H.) did not believe it to be better. He had freqenily heard it said, on other subjects, that the people require this and require that. But, with regard to the subject of the gentlemans' proposition, he had not heard the same remark. He hoped that, unless gentlemen had such reasons as would induce them to change their opinions, they would adhere to their declaration to support no amendment not absolutely called for by public opinion.

Mr. Dickey, of Beaver, remarked, that he was opposed to the tax qualification altogether. He considered that every man had the right to vole who was a citizen of the State, and what delegate here would say that a citizen shall not vote? He would vote for this amendment, not because he liked it, but because it was more liberal than the State and county tax qualification, and extended the right of suffrage. Under the State and county tax qualification, unless trades and occupations were taxed, a large number of citizens would be excluded from the right of suffrage. Some future Legislature might so alter the tax laws as to take away the qualifi. cation. This amendment would put it out of the power of after timnes to legislate men out of their votes. The State tax was repealed, and there was no State tax. He trusted that the day was not far distant when the income of the Public Works, or some other income, might be so great as to render county rates and levies unnecessary. Where then, he would enquire, was the right to vote? It was lost, and the whole people of the Commonwealth were excluded. The fact was, the payment of a tax should not be the test at the polls. The right of suffrage was a personal right.A nan should vote because he was a freeman. He (Mr. D.) would vote for this amendment, because it was better than the proposition of the gen. tleman from Chester, without it. It extended the right of suffrage, and he should therefore vote for it.

Mr. M’Dowell; Is it intended to limit this privilege to the county in which the road, poor, and school tax, is paid ?

Mr. Banks, of Mifflin, remarked, that he did not agree with the gentleman from Chester, (Mr. Bell) that this amedment went too far. For his part, he could not set bounds to the right of suffrage, and do justice to his feelings. He could not say, in relation to this right, " thus far thou shal,

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happen to become poor in the vicissitudes of fortune, and appear on the election ground without having paid taxes within two years, what would be his feelings if he should be told that he could not vote, because he had not contributed to the public taxes ? He had not so learned democracy. He said that he had boen instructed to cut off no man's vote, who was honest and faithful to the Constitution, and he would not vote to exclude any man from the ballot boxes, who was qualified in mind and body for an elector, and possessing the requisites indicated and mentioned. The principle contended against them is taxation, as giving the right to vote at elections by freemen, and he was opposed, both to the amendment and the amendment to the amendment. The gentleman from Beaver (Mr. Dickey) has taken the true ground that is to go for the amendment or proposition, which extends the right of suffrage on tax basis, as the choice of evils, reserving the right of correcting it afterwards. He (Mr. B.) would therefore vote for the proposition of the gentleman from Columbia, (Mr. HAYHURST) and if it should carry, then vote against the amendment as amended, or for it, as he might think most advisable for carrying out the views indicated and expressed by him. In conclusion, he wished not to be understood as desiring, that persons should be exempted from the payment of taxes in proportion to the estates or property which they possessed; but he objected to any, and all propositions which would, in any event, cause the honest and honorable poor man to lose his right to vote at elections, and for no other reason than “ because he had pot paid taxes".

His motto was,

“ Where liberty dwells, there is my country". Mr. Porter, of Northampton, said, that the gentleman from Mifflin, (Mr. Banks) and himself, would not be found to differ much when they understood each other. He (Mr. P.) had said, that he disliked the property qualification as much as the gentleman did. And, the injustice of it was never better illustrated than by Dr. FRANKLIN's story of the citizen and the Jackass, a man who had property in a Jackass, valued at 15, being entitled to vote, went to the polls and gave his vote accordingly.-But, before the next election the ass died, and the man presented himself at the hustings, intending to give his vote. It was, however, refused.He asked for what reason? The reply was, because at the last election he had an ass, and now he had not. The man then enquired, which had the right of voting-he, or the animal ?

The question was taken on the amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative-yeas, 55; nays, 52-as follows :

Yuas-Messus. Banks, Brown, of Northampton, Brown, of Philadelphia, Butler, Clarke, of Indiana, Cleavinger, Cochran, Cox, Crain, Cunningham, Curll, Darrah, D:nny, Dickey, Doran, Earle, Farrelly, Fleming, Foulkrod, Gamble, Gearhart, Gilmore, Grenell

, Hastings, Hayhurst, Helffenstein, Hyde, Kennedy, Lyons, Magee, Mann, Mar. tin, M'Cahen, Me-rill, Miller, Myers, Overfield, Purvi ance, Reigart, Read, Riter, Ritter, Rogers, Royer, Sellers, Scheetz, Shellito, Smith, Smyth, Sterigere, Swetland, Taggart, Weaver, Woodward, Young-55.

Nare-Messrs. Agnew, Ayres, Barndollar, Barnitz, Bayne, Bell, Biddle, Bigelow, Brown, of Lancaster, Chambers, Chandler, of Chester, Chauncey, Clarke, of Beaver, Clark, of_Dauphin, Coates, Cope, Craig, Cruin, Cummin, Darlington, Dickerson, Dillinger, Forward, Fry, Henderson, of Allegheny, Henderson, of Dauphin, Hiester, Hopkinson, Houpi, Jenks, Kerr, Konigmacher, Long, Maclay, M'Call, M'Dowell, M'Sherry, Meredith, Merkel, Montgomery, Pollock, Porter, of Lancaster, Poster, of

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