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THE IMPORTANCE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

TO THE WELFARE OF FRANCE:

GIVING ALSO

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An Account of their Productions, and the reciprocal

Advantages which may be drawn from their Com-
mercial Connexions:

AND FINALLY,

POINTING OUT THE ACTUAL SITUATION

OF THE

UN IT E D S T A T E S.

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH OF

ETIENNE CLAVIERE,

AND

J. Pierre

BRISSOT DE WAR VILLE.

L O N D ON:

PRINTED AT THE Logographic Press,
AND SOLD BY ROBSON AND CLARKE, NEW BOND STREET ; T. LONOMAX,
PATER-NOS TER-ROW ; AND W. RICHARDSON, Rosar-EXCHANCE.

1789.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

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kind.-Reflections on the sources whence facts have

been drawn, on the general spirit of this work, on the

order of the ideas, &c.

CHAPTER, I.

page 1.

Of exterior Commerce ; the Circumstances which led to it, and

of the means of alluring it to a nation.
General principles on exterior Commerce.
Direct Commerce preferable to that which is indirect.
It gives every thing at a cheaper rate.
The lowest price, the great basis of exterior commerce.
Circumstances which put in the power of a nation to sell at

the lowest price.
Circumstances which incline two nations to enter into a

league with each other by commercial connections.

The nature of things must furnish these circumstances; what is

the nature of things ?

CHAP.

( i )

CHAPTER II.

page is Of exterior Commerce, considered in its Means of Exchange,

and its Balance. Examination of what is understood by the balance of trade

between two nations.
It is proved, 1. That this balance of trade is but an in-

fignificant expression that the balance of an account paid
in gold, is not a proof of a disadvantageous commerce on
the
part

of the nation which pays it, nor of an advanta-
geous one on the part of that by which it is received.
II. That the tables of this balance of trade deserve no cre.

dit; and that the only method of estimating the encrease

of commerce, is by the encrease of population, III. That it is impossible to fix the quantity of money exist

ing in a country; and that all the calculations on this head, reft upon an uncertain and defective basis, because it is

impoflible to collect all their elements. IV. That metals are not real riches. V. That considered as agents of exchange, it would be more advantageous to substitute

paper

for them in interior commerce,

and not to be afraid to employ metals in exterior commerce, to which this paper cannot be applied. It results from these demonstrations, that a trade may be

opened between two nations, without the aid of money; that a nation will have so much the more of it to exchange for foreign productions, as it shall have a greater number of these confidential establishments, by which money is advantageously replaced.

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CHAPTER III.

page 29 Application of the foregoing general Principles, to the reciprocal

Commerce of France and the United States. That France has every Means of procuring a great Commerce, and 11:0je which must assure it to her in the United States ;

that

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that her Productions are proper for tben, and that her partie
cular interior Circumstances, oblige hir to engage in this Com.

merce.

Examination of the productions of France, of her industry

and of her geographical and natural position.
Examination of the objection, that it wouid be better to direct

the attention to the interior of France, than to open to her

a great exterior commerce.
'It is proved that exterior commerce would in a very short

time bring on an interior reform, and that France is, in
her fituation in great need of very confiderable foreigu mar-

kets.
An effential distinction to be made, in this respect, between a

new people, and a civilized people, who have numerous

manufactures.
It is proved that exterior commerce maintains and supports

them.,

Reflections on the inferiority of French manufactures to Eng

lish fabrics in certain articles—The causes pointed out.
The remedy in exterior commerce.

CHAPTER IV.

page 41

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That the United States are obliged by their present Necesties and

Circumstances to engage in Foreign Commerce.
That the writers who have treated on this matter have con-

sidered it in an abstracted point of view only.
That it is neceffary to examine it according to the state of

things.
And that according to this state, the free Americans are

obliged to employ themselves in exterior commerce.
To demonstrate this, it is proved that the free Americans have

wants of necessity, of convenience, and even some of luxury;
And which they can neither do without, nor supply them.
felves with,

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