Nature, Addresses, and Lectures

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Houghton, Mifflin & Company, 1883 - 372 páginas

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Página 21 - Give me health and a day, and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous. The dawn is my Assyria; the sunset and moonrise my Paphos, and unimaginable realms of faerie; broad noon shall be my England of the senses and the understanding; the night shall be my Germany of mystic philosophy and dreams.
Página 7 - Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe? Why should not we have a poetry and philosophy of insight and not of tradition, and a religion by revelation to us, and not the history of...
Página 108 - I ask not for the great, the remote, the romantic • what is doing in Italy or Arabia ; what is Greek art, or Proven§al minstrelsy ; I embrace the common, I explore and sit at the feet of the familiar, the low.
Página 29 - Every word which is used to express a moral or intellectual fact, if traced to its root, is found to be borrowed from some material appearance. Right means straight; wrong means twisted. Spirit primarily means wind; transgression, the crossing of a line; supercilious, the raising of the eyebrow.
Página 128 - That is always best which gives me to myself. The sublime is excited in me by the great stoical doctrine, Obey thyself. That which shows God in me, fortifies me. That which shows God out of me, makes me a wart and a wen.
Página 28 - The world thus exists to the soul to satisfy the desire of beauty. Extend this element to the uttermost, and I call it an ultimate end. No reason can be asked or given why the soul seeks beauty. Beauty, in its largest and profoundest sense, is one expression for the universe. God is the all-fair. Truth, and goodness, and beauty, are but different faces of the same All.
Página 66 - Once inhale the upper air, being admitted to behold the absolute natures of justice and truth, and we learn that man has access to the entire mind of the Creator, is himself the creator in the finite. This view, which admonishes me where the sources of wisdom and power lie, and points to virtue as to " The golden key Which opes the palace of eternity...
Página 34 - A man conversing in earnest, if he watch his intellectual processes, will find that a material image, more or less luminous, arises in his mind, cotemporaneous with every thought, which furnishes the vestment of the thought. Hence, good writing and brilliant discourse are perpetual allegories.
Página 66 - As a plant upon the earth, so a man rests upon the bosom of God, he is nourished by unfailing fountains, and draws, at his need, inexhaustible power Who can set bounds to the possibilities of man?
Página 26 - The intellect searches out the absolute order of things as they stand in the mind of God, and without the colors of affection...

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