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III.
Celtic Entries in tfce TBoofc of Deer.

NOTES OF GIFTS AND IMMUNITIES TO ST. COLUMBA, AND DROSTAN, BY THE MORMAERS AND TOISECHS OF BUCHAN—BY THE KING OF ALBA—AND BY THE MORMAERS OF MORAY.

These entries, in the vernacular Gaelic of Alba, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, are represented in facsimile on Plates III. IV. V. VI. and VII.

[the Foundat1on Of Deer.]

The legend which records the foundation of the monastery is begun on a spare half of folio 3, and is continued on the following folio. It is in the following terms :—

Columcille acusdrosUn mac c6sgreg adalta tangator ahi marroalseg dia doib go1ric abbordob6ir acusb^de cruthnec robomormaer biichan aragfnn acusess6 rothidnafg d6ib ingathraig sain insaere gobraith 6mormaer acusothosec . tangator asaathle sen incathraig ele acusdoraten ricolumcille si iarfallan d6rath d6 acusdorodloeg arinmormaer . i . bdd6 gondas tabrdd d6 acusnitharat acusrogdb mac d6 galar iarner6 naglerec acusrobomar$b act madbec iarsen dochuid inmormaer dattac naglerec g6ndendaes ernacde les inmac gondisad slante d6 acusd6rat inedbairt d6ib ua61oic intiprat gonice chl6ic pette meic garnait doronsat inernacde acustanic slante do; Iars6n dorat collumcille d6drostan inchadraig sen acusrosbenact acusforacaib imbrether gebe tisad ris nabad blienec buadacc tangatar deara drostan arscarthdin fri collumcille rolaboir columcille bededr dnim 6hunn imdec;

Columcille, and Drosldn son of Cosgrach, his pupil, came from Hi, as God had shown to them, unto Abbordoboir, and Bede the Pict was mormaer of Buchan before them, and it was he that gave them that town in freedom for ever from mormaer and toisech. They came after that to the other to1cn, and it icas pleasing to Columcille because it was full of God's grace, and he asked of the mormaer, to wit Bede, that he should give it to him; and he did not give it, and a son of his took an illness after [or in consequence of] refusing the clerics, and he was nearly dead [lit. he was dead but if it were a little]. After this the mormaer went to entreat the clerics that they should make prayer for the son, that health should come to him; and he gave in offering to them from Cloch in tiprat to Clock pette meic Garnait. They made the prayer, and health came to him. After tltat Columcille gave to Drostdn that town, and blessed it, and left as (his) icord, " Wlwsoever should come against it, let him not be manyycared [or] victorious" Drostdn's tears came on parting from Columcille. Said Columcille, "Let Dear be its name henceforward."

Two of St. Columba's great monastic foundations in Ireland were at Durrow, in King's County, and at Deny, places which in the Latin of Adamnan appear as Roboreti Campus (Dair-mag), and Roboretum Calgachi (Daire Calgaich). In both cases the sites derived their names from the surrounding oak-woods, and the latter Daire seems to have been the royal fort of Aedh, son of Ainmire, King of Erin, within which St. Columba founded his church after the royal grant of it.1

It seems in every way probable that the Deer of Buchan took its name, in like manner, from the surrounding oak-woods. The parish is believed to have been at one time covered with wood, and the names of such places as Aikiehill and Aikiebrae still preserve the recollection of the oaks which once grew there. The site of

1 Reeves' Adamnan, p. 160. Venerable Pagan times which has been recorded is, Bede speaks of the " copia roborum" at St. that it was a pleasant eminence covered Columba's monastery of Dearmach or Dur- with oaks. (Ordnance Survey of Londonrow, which, he says, in the language of the deny—Parish of Templemore — p. 18.) Scots means "campus roborum" (lib. iii. The same eminent antiquary,in treating of c. 4). Of Deny, Dr. Petrie tells us that the dmrtheachs, duirtheac/is, or dearteachs of the chief fact connected with its state in the Irish Annals, adopts the etymology which

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