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The dildo ever havel been action der regrets t1 that in the tory of Th done. The and the atte tion.

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; as, sis, tha: ci dove, iz. " ded on by anciens, except in to " che czempile of Puzdra, cired by M. R"me, and in that how short te werd "Fieber!

* Prore as that lore, being a hea sin, is fit for trageds, whicone "ceredbecause of the example of * Pizz; and how far Shakeipear bo to 6dcore them in friendship, &c.

* To trong to the beginning of ea. * 7; conlider if pity and terror be sugh * irrect to more: and I belie, una *Te ndios of tragedr, it was hund - Sie wit extends farther; asszis • I maden, by a deegee.com

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ill interest the audience in their , after all, in a larger sense, pity nds this concernment for the good, r includes detestation for the bad,

us consider whether the English · answered this end of tragedy, as he ancients, or perhaps better. nere Mr. Rymer's objections against ays are to be impartially weighed, may see whether they are of weight

to turn the balance against our ymen.

evident those plays, which he ar, have moved both those passions in a segree upon the stage. · give the glory of this away from the and to place it upon the actors, seems

ne reason is, because whatever actors

have found, the event has been the e; that is, the same passions have been ays moved; which shews, that there is aething of force and merit in the plays emselves, conduring to the plalign of raiig these two : ar y se them ver to have

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“ passions; as, namely, that of love, scarce « touched on by the ancients, except in this “ one example of Phædra, cited by Mr. Ry“ mer; and in that how short they were of " Fletcher!

“ Prove also that love, being an heroick “ passion, is fit for tragedy, which cannot be “ denied, because of the example alledged of “ Phædra; and how far Shakespeare has out« done them in friendship, &c.

" To return to the beginning of this enqui« ry; consider if pity and terror be enough for tragedy to move; and I believe, upon a “ true definition of tragedy, it will be found “ that its work extends farther; and that it is " to reform manners, by a delightful repre“ sentation of human life in great persons, by s way of dialogue. If this be true, then not « only pity and terror are to be moved, as " the only means to bring us to virtue, but “ generally love to virtue and hatred to vice; “ by shewing the rewards of one, and punish“ ments of the other; at least, by rendering “ virtue always amiable, tho'it be shewn un« fortunate; and vice detestable, tho' it be « shewn triumphant.

“ If, then, the encouragement of virtue and « discouragement of vice be the proper ends of s poetry in tragedy, pity and terror, tho'good “ means, are not the only. For all the pal“ fions, in their turns, are to be set in a fer“ ment: as joy, anger, love, fear, are to be “ used as the poet's common-places; and a “ general concernment for the principal actors " is to be raised, by making them appear luc “ in their characters, their words, and acti

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« ons, as will interest the audience in their “ fortunes.

" And if, after all, in a larger sense, pity “ comprehends this concernment for the good, “ and terror includes detestation for the bad, “ then let us consider whether the English “ have not answered this end of tragedy, as “ well as the ancients, or perhaps better.

“ And here Mr. Rymer's objections against " these plays are to be impartially weighed, “ that we may see whether they are of weight “ enough to turn the balance against our “ countrymen.

“ 'Tis evident those plays, which he ar“ raigns, have moved both those passions in a “ high degree upon the stage.

“ To give the glory of this away from the " poet, and to place it upon the actors, seems « unjust.

“ One reason is, because whatever actors " they have found, the event has been the “ fame; that is, the same passions have been “ always moved; which shews, that there is “ something of force and merit in the plays “ themselves, conducing to the design of rai“fing these two passions: and suppose them “ ever to have been excellently acted, yet “ action only adds grace, vigour, and more “ life, upon the stage; but cannot give it “ wholly where it is not first. But, secondly, I “ dare appeal to those who have never seen “ them acted, if they have not found these " two passions moved within them : and if the

general voice will carry it, Mr. Rymer's prejudice will take off his single testimony.

« This,

formerly read; without much reflection, of the multitude of Scotchmen that travelled with their wares in Poland; and that their numbers were not small, the success of this negotiation gives sufficient evidonce.

About this time, what estate the war and the gamesters had left him was sold, by order of the parliament; and when, in 1652, he returned to England, he was entertained by the earl of Pembroke.

Of the next years of his life there is no account. At the restoration he obtained, what many missed, the reward of his loyalty ; being made surveyor of the king's buildings, and dignified with the order of the Bath. He seems now to have learned some attention to money; for Wood says, that he got by his place seven thousand pounds.

After the Restoration he wrote the poem on Prudence and Justice, and perhaps some of his other pieces: and as he appears, whenever ao ny serious question comes before him, to have been a man of piety, he consecrated his poetical powers to religion, and made a metrical version of the Psalms of David. In this attempt he has failed; but in sacred poetry, who has succeeded?

It might be hoped that the favour of his master and esteem of the publick would now make him happy. But human felicity is short and uncertain : a second marriage brought upon him so much disquiet, as for a time disordered his understanding; and Butler lampooned him for his lunacy. I know nor whether the malignant lines were then made publick, nor what provocation incited Butler to do that which no provocation can excuse.

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