Imagens da página
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

GEORGE STEPNEY, descended from the Stepneys of Pendegrast in Pembrokeshire, was born at Westminster in 1663. Of his father's condition or fortune I have no account. Having received the first part of his education at Westminster, he went to Cambridge, where he continued a friendship begun at school with Mr. Montague, afte of Halifax. They came to London together, and are said to have been invited into publick life by the duke of Dorset.

His qualifications recommended him to many foreign employments, so that his time seems to have been spent in negotiations. In 1692 he was sent envoy to the elector of Brande burgh; in 1693 to the imperial Court; in 1694 to the elector of Saxony; in 1666 to the electors of Mentz and Cologne, and the congress at Francfort; in 1698 a second time to Brandenburgh; in 1699 to the king of Poland; in 1701 again to the Emperor; and in 1706 to the States General. In 1697 he was made one of the commissioners of trade. His life was busy, and not long. He died in 1707; and is buried in Westminster-abbey with this epitaph, which Jacob transcribed.

H. S. E.

S

T

É P N

E

Y.

GEORGE STEPNEY, descended from the Stepneys of Pendegrast in Pembrokeshire, was born at Westminster in 1663. Of his father's condition or fortune I have no account. Having received the first part of his education at Westminster, he went to Cambridge, where he continued a friendship begun at school with Mr. Montague, afterwards earl of Halifax. They came to London together, and are said to have been invited into publick life by the duke of Dórfet.

His qualifications recommended him to many foreign employments, so that his time seems to have been spent in negotiations. In 1692 he was sent envoy to the elector of Brandenburgh; in 1693 to the imperial Court; in 1694 to the elector of Saxony; in 1666 to the electors of Mentz and Cologne, and the congress at Francfort; in 1698 a second time to Brandenburgh; in 1699 to the king of Poland; in 1701 again to the Emperor'; and in 1706 to the States General. In 1697 he was made one of the commissioners of trade. His life was busy, and not long. He died in 1707; and is buried in Westminster-abbey with this epitaph, which Jacob' transcribed.

H. S. E.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

W ILLIAM WALSH, the son of Joseph Walsh, Esq; of Abberley in Worcesterîhire, was born in 1663, as appears from the account of Wood; who relates, that at the age of fifteen he became, in 1678, a gentleman commoner of Wadham college.

He left the university without a degree, and pursued his studies in London and at home; that he studied, in whatever place, is apparent from the effect; for he became, in Mr. Dryden's opinion, the best critick in the nation.

He was not, however, merely a critick or a scholar. He was likewise a member of parliament and a courtier, knight of the shire for his native county in several parliaments; in a. nother the representative of Richmond in Yorkshire, and gentleman of the horse to Queen Anne under the duke of Somerset.

Some of his verses shew him to have been a zealous friend to the Revolution; but his political ardour did not abate his reverence or kindness for Dryden, to whom he gave a Dissertation on Virgil's Pastorals, in which, however studied, he discovers some ignorance of the laws of French versification.

In 1705, he began to correspond with Mr. Pope, in whom he discovered very early the power of poetry. Their letters are written Hh

upon

« AnteriorContinuar »