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Right trusty and right welbeloved Cousin and Councellor &c., We greete you well. We have received your severall letterslately presented to Vs by Mr. Wynrame of Libertoun, and doe graciously accept all those expressions of affection and fidelity you make to us therein, together with that tender sense of our present condition, and just indignation which you professe to have against the execrable murtherers of the King our late deare and Royall Father of blessed memory, believing that your intentions are as full of loyalty and candour to us, as we are and have always been reall in our desires to begett such a clear and right understanding betweene us, and all our subjects of that our ancient Kingdome of Scotland, as might be a sure foundation of their future peace and happiness, and an effectual means to roote up those seedes of division and animosity which have been occasioned by the late Troubles; And so to vnite the hearts and affections of our Subjects to one another, and to Vs thair lawfull King and Soveraigne, that by their due obedience and submission to our just authority, We may be enabled to maintaine them in peace and prosperity, and to protect them in their Religion and Liberties, as to our Kingly office belongeth. And as we have ever resolved to contribute all that depends of us to these good ends, and to the just satisfaction of all our subjects of that our Kingdome, so wehave now thought fitt by the returne of Mr. Wynrame to desire that Commissioners be sent to us sufficiently authorized to treate and agree with vs, upon all particulars, as well in relation to the concernments and just satisfaction of our Subjects there, as to those helpes and assistances We may reasonably expect from them for the bringing of the murtherers of our late deare Father of blessed memory, to condigne punishment, and for the recovery of our just rights in all our kingdomes, and that they attend us by the fifteenth of March next at Breda, where we intend (God willing) to be. In order whereunto and in confidence of such a Treaty as also to evidence to you and to the whole world that We sincerely desire to agree with you, and expecting that no other use shall be made of it to the prejudice of us or Our affairis then what we intend in order to the Treaty. Notwithstanding many important considerations that might haue dissuaded us from doing anything antecedently at this time, We have resolved to direct this letter unto you by the name of the Committee of Estates of that our Kingdome, hoping that from the confidence Wee express in your clear and candid intentions toward us, you will deriue effectuall arguments to yourselves of mutuall confidence in us, which by the blessing of Almighty God, by your just and prudent moderation, by the earnest Desire Weehave to oblige all our Subjects of this Kingdome, and by means of the Treaty which we expect and desire may be the foundation of a full and happy Agreement between us, and of the future Peace and Security of this Nation, which we assure you Wee passionately desire and shall effectually endeavour: And, so Wee bid you very heartly farewell. Given at our Court in Jersey, the #3 day of January 1643. In the first year of our Reign.

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Jaffray,” directing them, as Commissioners, “to repair to his Heynes at Breda to treat with his Majesty upon the grounds of the former desires presented to him at the Hague be the Commissioners of the Parliament of this Kingdom, according to the Solemn League and Covenant.” At the same time there was “Ane letter of Credit granted to the Commissioners to borrow beyond seas, upon the credit of this Kingdom, the sum of £300,000. In the Appendix of “State Papers” collected by Edward, Earl of Clarendon, Vol. II, Oxford, 1773, will also be found the various papers written by the Commissioners of Parliament of the Kirk of Scotland, at Breda, &c., between March 25th and June 22nd, 1650. Signed by the Earls of CAssiLLls and Lothian, Brodie, and the other Commissioners. Of the numerous letters and papers connected with these negotiations, only a few can be selected. The first is from Peck’s “Desiderata Curiosa,” (Lond. 1732–35 or 1779), which also contains Letters addressed to Charles the Second, from Mr. Douglas, Moderator of the Assembly, the Earl of Loudoun, Lord Chancellor of Scotland, and the Marquess of Argyle, 21st of February and the 9th of March, exhorting his Majesty to take the Covenant. It is entitled by Peck, “Commission of the Commissioners sent from the estates of Scotland in Parliament, to K. Charles II., to exhort him to take the Covenant. From the very attested copy, sent to the King himself at Breda, (once Mr. Oudart's) now in the hands of the Editor”:—

I. The Estates of Parliament presently conveened, in the first session of this second trienniall parliament, haveing resolved, that, in prosecution of their former desires, commissioners should be sent to his Majesty; and having sufficient proof and experience of the faithfulnesse, good deserveings, and abilities of the right honourable John Earle of Cassils, William Earle of Lothian, Alexander Brody of that ilk, and Mr. George Wynrame of Libbertoun, two of the senators of the College of justice, Sir John Smith, and Alexander Jaffray; doth therefore, nominate, appoint, authorise, and give power to the fore said persons, being all present together, and to any four of them (but, in case of sickness, returne, or necessary absence of the rest, to any three of them) to repair to the King's Majestie at Breda, or where hee shall happen to be within the united provinces or their dominions, or to any other place where the reformed religion is professed or tollerated; and

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