No Direction Home: The American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 27 de jan de 2010 - 336 páginas
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Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture. In No Direction Home, Natasha Zaretsky shows that these perceptions of decline profoundly shaped one another.

Throughout the 1970s, anxieties about the future of the nuclear family collided with anxieties about the direction of the United States in the wake of military defeat in Vietnam and in the midst of economic recession, Zaretsky explains. By exploring such themes as the controversy surrounding prisoners of war in Southeast Asia, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-74, and debates about cultural narcissism, Zaretsky reveals that the 1970s marked a significant turning point in the history of American nationalism. After Vietnam, a wounded national identity--rooted in a collective sense of injury and fueled by images of family peril--exploded to the surface and helped set the stage for the Reagan Revolution. With an innovative analysis that integrates cultural, intellectual, and political history, No Direction Home explores the fears that not only shaped an earlier era but also have reverberated into our own time.

 

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Conteúdo

Introduction
1
Prisoners of War National Defeat and the Crisis of Male Authority
25
The Oil Embargo Consumption and the Limits of American Power
71
Productivity Lag and the End of the Family Wage
105
The Bicentennial and Cold War Revivalism
143
Narcissism Malaise and the MiddleClass Family
183
The Familial Roots of Republican Domination
223
Notes
247
Bibliography
287
Acknowledgments
305
Index
307
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Página 5 - We have some things in this country which are infinitely precious and especially American— a love of freedom, a feeling for the equality of opportunity, a tradition of self-reliance and independence and also of co-operation.

Sobre o autor (2010)

Natasha Zaretsky is assistant professor of history at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

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