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Printed by 6. H. Davidson, Ireland Yard, Doctors' Comwons.

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EPIGRAMMATIC SCRAPS:

BEING

A COLLECTION OF REMARKABLE

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COMPILED FROM THE MOST ANCIENT AS WELL AS MODERN
SOURCES, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC,

SERIOUS AND FACETIOUS:

TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED,

Some Observations on Churches, Church-Yards, Rites of
Sepulture, Tombs, and Mausoleums;

WITH INSTRUCTIONS FOR

ASCERTAINING THE DATES OF ANCIENT MONJWENTS.

BY WILLIAM PULLEYN

"We read their Monument*—we sigh, and,\
We sigh, we sink, and are what we deploi
Lamenting, or lamented, all our lot."

"Better to have a bad Epitaph when dead, than
living.''—Hamlet.

"How does the little Epigram delight,
And charm us with its miniature of wit I
While tedious authors give the reader pain,
Weary his thoughts, and make him toll in vain;
When in less volumes we more pleasure find,
And what diverts still best informs the mind."

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INTRODUCTION.

If the minstrel may presume on success, where fiction frames his lay—if the author may calculate on laurels, who wields a prolific pen—perhaps, he who is a gatherer of the "longings after immortality," and their Epigrammatic sisterhood, may be allowed to encourage a hope, that his endeavours to please will not prove wholly unsuccessful.

By the serious-minded, much will be found in this small volume, that will accord with their feelings; by the curious, much that is interesting; and by the lovers of Epigrammatic wit, a selection of the choicest morceaux. The gay and thoughtless, the ambitious and worldlyminded, may also find in it matter for serious and humiliating reflection, while all may derive amusement from it; his object being to avert the broodings of melancholy, and the visionary chimeras of a diseased imagination, without giving offence to any.

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