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days here. He died here in 1853. His son Volney, the well known editor of the Gazette for years, studied law with Mr. Belcher and was admitted but gave little attention to practice. He died February, 1870.

JEREMIAH HUMPHREY.

Jeremiah Humphrey came here in 1832 from Connecticut and was really among the ablest of the early lawyers. He removed to Iowa and died in 1849.

WALTER CLARK,

Walter Clark was a graduate of Union college, was admitted to the Kala- , mazoo bar in 1837, became a partner with N. A. Balch, was deputy county clerk, and remarkable for his fine literary attainments. He died here Jan., 1842.

MITCHELL HINSDILL.

Mitchell Hinsdill was a Vermonter, and admitted to this bar Nov. 19, 1834, served as prosecuting attorney in 1835, and as judge of probate from 1836 to 1844. He was, too, one of the leading farmers of Kalamazoo county. He died in 1854.

DAVID HUBBARD.

David Hubbard was another of the young lawyers who gave excellent promise of eminence at the bar. After admission he located at Schoolcraft. He served in the Mexican war under Col. Curtenius. He resumed practice after the war but failing health, caused by his war service, compelled him to abandon his profession. He died in Kalamazoo in 1852, deeply regretted by & multitude of friends.

CHARLES B. HAYDEN.

Charles B. Hayden studied law with Stuart & Miller and was regarded at the time as the most promising student in the place. He early enlisted in the war and speedily reached the rank of lieutenant colonel. He died at Cincinnati, universally mourned in his regiment and by all who knew him.

JAMES H. KINNANE.

Mr. Kinnare became a member of the Michigan bar on March 17, 1883, and began practice in Kalamazoo in April, 1884. He is a rising young lawyer.

JAMES H. KNIGHT.

James H. Knight, though admitted to the bar here, did not practice in this court to any considerable extent. He died in St. Louis, December, 1875. In

our notice of the county clerks we gave a brief history of his life. He became a very popular judge of the circuit court in St. Louis.

CYRUS LOVELL.

*Cyrus Lovell was a native of Windham county, Vt. ; he came to Kalamazoo in 1832; it is claimed he built the first frame house, corner of South street and St. John's place, now occupied by Mr. Perrin's house; he held the offices of supervisor, justice and prosecuting attorney; was a soldier in the Black Hawk war and subsequently received a bounty of 160 acres of land; he was a man of ability; removed to Ionia in 1836, was elected to the constitutional convention in 1850, twice elected to the legislature and was once 'a speaker, and was receiver of the United States land office at Ionia. He still lives—a hale old man.

GEN. DWIGHT MAY,

Gen. Dwight May was born in Berskhire Co., Mass., Sept. 8, 1822. He read law with Lothrop & Duffield in Detroit, after graduating in the university at Ann Arbor. He commenced the practice of law in Battle Creek in 1850, and became associated with Marsh Giddings. He became a resident of Kalamazoo in 1852, when he soon became a prominent citizen and a successful attorney. In 1861 he was chosen captain of Co. I, Second regiment. In December he resigned, came home and closed up his law business, and October 8, 1862, was appointed lieutenant colonel of the 12th Mich. Infantry, and with his regiment was mustered out March 5, 1866. He was chosen a trustee of the village and was twice its president, an excellent, efficient and faithful officer. In 1866 he was elected lieutenant governor of Michigan; in 1869 attorney general, holding the office two terms. He was a leading lawyer, was prosecuting attorney, and employed in many important cases. He suffered for years from disease contracted in his army life. His record as an officer was a very fine one. In his death the people felt they had lost a most valuable citizen. His funeral was one of the largest ever held here, attended by judges of the supreme court and comrades from a distance.

SQUIRE MILLER.

Squire Miller, father of Joseph, Jr., and James Miller, and of Hon. E. R. Miller, who still lives at Richland, was an excellent lawyer, one of the gentlemen of the old school. He was admitted to the bar before Judge Fletcher, but did not practice.

* See vol. 7, page 481. +See vol. 4, page 285.

ZEPHANIAH PLATT.

Zephaniah Platt was admitted to the bar November 1, 1836. He was a superior chancery lawyer and was prominent in all matters in the village. He returned to New York, and practiced there and in Washington very successfully.

PAUL W. H. RAWLS.

Paul W. H. Rawls was another victim of the Mexican war. He was a student in the office of Stuart & Miller. After his admission in 1848 he joined Captain Curtenius's company and died soon after the return of his regiment. He was a college graduate and a young man of fine literary attainments— a poet, scholar, and a true gentleman-one of the most estimable of young men, beloved by all and deeply mourned.

CHARLES K. TURNER.

Charles K. Turner, one of the brightest ornaments of the bar among the young men, died some five years ago. His future as a lawyer was regarded full of success.

CHARLES A. THOMPSON.

Charles A. Thompson was admitted to practice here after graduating at the state university, concluding his studies with May & Giddings; was elected circuit commissioner and prosecuting attorney. He was a captain in the 19th regiment. He died here in 1871 from disease contracted in the army. He was a lawyer, skilled in office practice, no one of his years surpassed him here, and his army record was a brilliant one.

DAVID B. WEBSTER.

David B. Webster was born in Chittenden county, Vt. He practiced law in Montpelier, removed to Kalamazoo in 1836, and was associated in the practice of law with Hon. Chas. E. Stuart. He served a term as prosecuting attorney and in 1845 was elected judge of probate. President Taylor appointed him receiver of the land office and he served three years. He died May 8, 1860, at this place. Judge Webster was a genial gentleman, an upright and capable officer, and universally respected and esteemed.

CLEMENT C. WEBB.

Clement C. Webb soon after being admitted to the bar joined the 13th regiment and was made captain. He was a brave soldier and died of his wounds in the hospital at Murfreesboro, Feb. 14, 1863.

THE HALDIMAND PAPERS.

[CONTINUED FROM Vol. 10.]

COPIES OF PAPERS ON FILE IN THE DOMINION ARCHIVES AT OTTAWA,
CANADA, PERTAINING TO THE RELATIONS OF THE BRITISH
GOVERNMENT WITH THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH
AMERICA AND TO THE MILITARY POSTS
AND MARINE INTERESTS OF
THE GREAT LAKES.

1762-1799.

NOTE.-Care has been taken in publishing the following papers to follow the original copies as closely as possible, including orthography, punctuation, capitalization, etc. The references in brackets at the close of each paper are to the filings in the Dominion archives at Ottawa.

CORRESPONDENCE, INDIAN COUNCILS, PROCEEDINGS

OF COURTS, ETC.

GENERAL HALDIMAND TO MR. ROCHEBLAVE.

QUEBEC 2nd Novr. 1782. SIR, I have read with attention the memorial which you have sent me & it is with true regret, Sir, that I see you are interested in the Bills of Exchange from Michilimakinac, against the positive orders that I had given, less against those in favor of whom they are drawn. My duty towards the state obliges me to allow them to be protested.

I am &c. (signed)

F. H. Mr. de Rocheblave Endorsed:-Copy 1782 to Mr. Rocheblave of the 2nd Novr. [B 123 p 335]

GENERAL HALDIMAND TO HON. THOMAS TOWNSHEND,

QUEBEC, 9th November 1782.

Orig'l–Drake 12th

Dupl’te-Cockatrice 14th The Right Honble Thomas Townshend (No 20)

SIR, I have to add to my Letter by the Convoy wherein I mentioned, the Conduct of Lieut Gov'r Sinclair, that the Bills drawn by him in favor of Mr. McBeath, of which a considerable part, is for Merchandise, purchased, contrary, to my orders, have been protected, I do myself the Honor to Transmit to you, a copy of the Letter, I have written to the Secretary, of the Treasury for the Information of their Lordships.

Lieut. Governor Sinclair, not only disobeyed my orders, prohibiting the Purchase, of Merchandise, but in answer to one of my Letters complaining of the very Great Expense, incurred at the Post, where he commanded, he acquainted me, that a very Great Part, of it was for Presents, given to the Indians, by Traders, in their Wintering grounds not authorized, by him.It is to be regretted, that he did not give me that information previous to my accepting & Paying Bills of Exchange, in which these unjustizyable, Charges, were, Comprehended ;-from this & his other proceedings, I conceived, my indispensible duty, to recall him, I flatter myself, that the King's Ministers, must be convinced of my attention to Diminish the Public Expense, the whole tenor of my conduct, and Correspondence, must evince it,

The authorising the Remitters Agent, to give Credit, for Bills of Exchange, was in me the Effect of necessity, not of choice, and was occasioned, by the delay, of sending out Species, tho' repeatedly requested, in my Letters.

I have now to acquaint you Sir, that a Spirit of Monopoly, pervaded, this Province, a Combination has been made & Succeeded, in Engrossing, into a few hands, the Rum, Brandy & other Spirituous, Liquors, which have been

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