Report on the State of Public Instruction in Prussia: Addressed to the Count de Montalivet ...

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E. Wilson, 1834 - 333 páginas
 

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Página 182 - Spirit, if any bowels and mercies ; fulfil ye my joy, that ye be like-minded, and having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through strife, or vain-glory, but in lowliness of mind ; let each esteem others better than themselves.
Página 182 - Let nothing be done through strife or vain-glory, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.
Página iv - He paused, as if revolving in his soul Some weighty matter, then, with fervent voice And an impassioned majesty, exclaimed — " O for the coming of that glorious time When, prizing knowledge as her noblest wealth And best protection, this imperial Realm, While she exacts allegiance, shall admit An obligation, on her part, to teach Them who are born to serve her and obey ; Binding herself by statute to secure For all the children whom her soil maintains The rudiments of letters, and inform The mind...
Página 289 - It cannot be denied that it is. I ask, then, is it our object to respect the religion of the people, or to destroy it ? If we mean to set about destroying it, then, I allow, we ought by no means to have it taught in the people's schools. But if the object we propose to ourselves is totally different, we must teach our children that religion which civilized our fathers ; that religion whose liberal spirit prepared, and can alone sustain, all the great institutions of modern times.
Página 288 - Leaving to the cure, or to the pastor of the place, the care of instilling the doctrines peculiar to each communion, we must constitute religion a special object of instruction, which must have its place in each year of the Normal course ; so that at the end of the entire course, the young masters, without being theologians, may have a clear and precise Knowledge of the history, doctrines, and, above all, the moral precepts of Christianity. Without this, the pupils, when they become masters, would...
Página 292 - ... at Paris. Yet it is not from Rome, but from Berlin, that I address you. The man who holds this language to you is a philosopher, formerly disliked, and even persecuted, by the priesthood; but this philosopher has a mind too little affected by the recollection of his own insults, and is too well acquainted with human nature and with history, not to regard religion as an indestructible power: genuine Christianity, as a means of civilization for the people, and a necessary support for those on whom...
Página 262 - The pupils having then about ten lessons a week to give in the annexed school, (lessons for which they must be well prepared,) follow fewer courses in the school. Our principal aim, in each kind of instruction, Is to induce the young men to think and judge for themselves. We are opposed to all mechanical study and servile transcripts. The masters of our primary schools must possess intelligence themselves, in order to be able to awaken it in their pupils; otherwise, the state would doubtless prefer...
Página 124 - I mean, the combined action of the municipal councils and the departmental councils, — of the maires and the prefects. After the administrative authorities, it is unquestionably the clergy who ought to occupy the most important place in the business of popular education. How is it possible they could neglect, nay even repugn, such a mission ? But that they have done so is a fact, which, however deplorable, we are bound to acknowledge. The clergy in France are generally indifferent, or even hostile,...
Página 253 - ... instruction in which they are deficient. It is nevertheless necessary to have some preliminary notions, seeing that the courses at the Normal School are often a continuation of foregone studies, and that certain branches could not be there treated in their whole extent, if they were wholly unknown to the young men when they entered. We have already mentioned the branches they should be most particularly prepared in; but this subject being of the greatest interest, we shall conclude this chapter...
Página 291 - The more I think of all this, Sir, the more I look at the schools in this country, the more I talk with the directors of normal schools and councillors of the ministry, the more I am strengthened in the conviction that we must make any efforts or any sacrifices to come to a good understanding with the clergy on the subject of popular education, and to constitute religion a special and very carefully-taught branch of instruction in our primary normal schools.

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