The Development of John Dryden's Literary Criticism

Capa
Modern language association of America, 1907 - 139 páginas
 

O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha

Não encontramos nenhuma resenha nos lugares comuns.

Termos e frases comuns

Passagens mais conhecidas

Página 72 - If I would compare him with Shakespeare, I must acknowledge him the more correct poet, but Shakespeare the greater wit. Shakespeare was the Homer, or father of our dramatic poets; Jonson was the Virgil, the pattern of elaborate writing; I admire him, but I love Shakespeare.
Página 84 - So then the first happiness of the poet's imagination is properly invention, or finding of the thought ; the second is fancy, or the variation, deriving, or moulding, of that thought, as the judgment represents it proper to the subject ; the third is elocution, or the art of clothing and adorning that thought, so found and varied, in apt, significant, and sounding words. The quickness of the imagination is seen in the invention, the fertility in the fancy, and the accuracy in the expression.
Página 123 - I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance.
Página 128 - This, says my author, is the gift of Jupiter ; and to speak in the same heathen language, we call it the gift of our Apollo, not to be obtained by pains or study, if we are not born to it; for the motions which are studied, are never so natural as those •which break out in the height of a real passion. Mr. Otway possessed this part as thoroughly as any of the ancients or moderns.
Página 102 - As I am no successor to Homer in his wit, so neither do I desire to be in his poverty. I can make no rhapsodies, nor go a begging at the Grecian doors, while I sing the praises of their ancestors. The times of Virgil please me better, because he had an Augustus for his patron; and, to draw the allegory nearer you, I am sure I shall not want a Maecenas with him.
Página 129 - For, impartially speaking, the French are as much better critics than the English, as they are worse poets. Thus we generally allow, that they better understand the management of a war than our islanders ; but we know we are superior to them in the day of battle. They value themselves on their generals, we on our soldiers. But this is not the proper place to decide that question, if they make it one.
Página 130 - Let the French and Italians value themselves on their regularity; strength and elevation are our standard. I said before, and I repeat it, that the affected purity of the French has unsinewed their heroic verse.
Página 121 - ... do good to both; which is the part of a wise and an honest man, and proves that it is possible for a courtier not to be a knave. I shall continue still to speak my thoughts like a free-born subject, as I am; though such things, perhaps, as no Dutch commentator could, and I am sure no Frenchman durst.
Página 71 - All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there.
Página 131 - He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales" the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his age.

Informações bibliográficas