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Turkish Coffee-House, A............319, 551

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Bishop Scott.....

1 The Manor House at Stoke.....

296

Goldsmith's Deserted Village (11 eng.)....... Stoke Pogis Church.......

297

View of the Old Institution for the Deaf and The Ivy-mantled Tower................

297

Dumb

10 Yew Trees.....

300

View of the New Institution...

12

The Porch of Stoke Pogis Church..... 301

Plan of principal Floor...........

13 Gray's Monument....

301

The Temple of Mecca..........

16 The French Crystal Palace........

304

Mountains of Usdum............

20 Opening of the French Crystal Palace by the

Apples of Sodom.........

27 Emperor........

305

Dante

28

The Captivity and its Mementoes (6 eng.)... 306

George G. Cookman..

98 Lunatic Asylum, Blackwell's Island........... 314

A Picture by Keats...

105 Lunar Scenery..

316

Orphanage...

106

Bishop Ames.......

385

Acadian Scenery.

107 Clock-House......

390

Village of Acadia..

108 More's House....

391

The Church...

112

Chelsea Church..

393

Acadians in Chains.............

113 More's Tomb.........

394

The Sea-Shore.......

114 Roper's House.....

395

Watt's Monument, Westminster Abbey..... 116 Floral Festival at the Crystal Palace, Syden-

The Winged Lion.....

119

ham

396

Self-Immolation of Sardanapalus............... 120 River of the Water of Life.

398

Chancery Lane.......

169 Meadow of Lilies......

399

Beresford Hall...

170

The Sabbath (4 eng.)

401

Pike Pool..........

171 Winter.....

404

Fishing House....

172 The Bat-Tribe (4 eng.).

405

Walton's Dining Room...

173 | Snow-Crystals......

408

Walton's Tomb.....

174 Babylon

457

The Mariner's Hospital...

176 The King and Vessels.......

459

Bishop Baker......

193 Nehemiah and Artaxerxes............

460

Hogarth's House....

197 James T. Fields........

462

Room in Hogarth's House.....

199 Rydal Mount, Wordsworth's Residence...... 463

Hogarth's Painting Room...

200

Valentin..........

481

Tombs of Dog and Bird........

201 The Yule-Log..........

485

Hogarth's Tomb..........

202 The Christmas Feast.................

486

Bass-relief on Hogarth's Tomb...

202 Remembering the Poor...

486

203

Mumming....

487

Autumn

205 A Church Decorated with Holly............... 490

Picturesque Scenery....

206

Winter Scenery.

491

New-York Institution for the Blind.... 208 A Turkish Coffee-House...........

493

The Maid of Orleans....

209 Military Stratagems.....

495

Statue of the Maid of Orleans......

216 The Shipwreck

496

The Mangosteen.........

217 Grace Church, Buffalo, N. Y.......... 504

Fruit of the Mangosteen.....

218 Plan of the Basement...

505

The Jasmine-Flowered Rhododendron........ 219 | Plan of the main Audience-Room............... 506

James Montgomery.....

220 Gallery Plan.....

507

Story of Ancient Nineveh (2 eng.).

226 Christ's Church, Pittsburgh, Penn..... 508

Bishop Simpson..........

289 Plan of the main Audience-Room..............

510

Casa Wappy (7 eng.).....

293 | The Deluge (2 eng.) .........

538

Whither ??? ..............

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A : .

T the last session of the General Con- Philadelphia. In 1829 he returned to the

In 1830 he was sent to Church four new bishops were elected. West Chester, Pennsylvania, whither he We propose to give portraits of each, with returned in 1831. In 1832, his health “pen-and-ink” sketches: the latter will having failed, he was given the relation of be very brief but accurate—the former supernumerary. In 1833 he resumed an may not be the most accurate in every effective relation, and was sent to Kent case, but shall be as good as the paintings County, Maryland. In 1834 and 1835 he or daguerreotypes, from which our artists traveled Delaware District, on the “Pecopy, will admit.

ninsula." In 1836 he was stationed at Bishop Scott was born October 11, Franklin-street Church, Newark, New1802, at Cantwell's Bridge, Newcastle Jersey ; in 1837 and 1838 at Ebenezer County, Delaware, and joined the Method Church, Philadelphia ; 1839, St. Paul's, ist Episcopal Church October 16, 1822. Philadelphia. In 1840 he was appointed He entered the Philadelphia Conference principal of Dickinson Grammar School, in 1826, and was sent to Talbott Circuit, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In the same year and in 1827 to Dover Circuit. In 1828 the honorary degree of A. M. was conhe was stationed in St. George's Charge, ferred upon him by the Wesleyan Uni

VOL. VII.-1

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versity, Middletown, Connecticut. In tical talent must the Church have pos-
1843 he resigned his position at Carlisle, sessed if it has managed properly this
and was appointed to Union Church, Phil- immense and complicated business, under
adelphia ; and in 1844 was resent to the such circumstances - a business and an
same charge. In 1845-8 he was the amount of property which no ordinary
presiding elder of the South Philadelphia capitalists would dare to trust to any
District. In 1846 the honorary degree other than the most able and experienced
of D. D. was conferred upon him by De- / management. But it has grown richer
laware College, Newark, Del. He has and richer - a fact which no one can
been honored with an election to the Ge- deny.
neral Conference at every session since Whether, however, its success has, in
1832. In 1848 he was elected by that spite of its management, been owing to the
body Assistant Book Agent, in New-York, vast and peculiar advantages of its deno-
where he performed important service to the minational market which now commands,
Church in the noted lawsuit case. It is a it is estimated, about one-fifth of the popu-
singular fact that while no Church holds lation of the country, and is everywhere
more extreme views respecting the sacred- reached by its itinerant agencies—and
ness and exclusiveness of the ministerial whether it ought to have been double
work and the ministerial “call” or “com what it has been—and whether its capital
mission,” Methodism has, nevertheless, for yields anything like the interest which
nearly three quarters of a century, spared ordinary business men expect, are ques-
from its regular ministry some of its tions which captious critics in the Church
strongest men for the management of papers have not yet decided. One thing
the secular business and financial re seems plain enough, viz., that with the
sponsibilities of its “Book Concern” recent and prospective enlargement of
not merely for editors—that might be de- this really stupendous interest, the old
sirable and seemly enough as a necessary policy must be modified, either by retain-
guard of the moral or theological char-ing permanently, in the management of
acter of its publications, but, we repeat, the Concern, really capable men when
for its business management ; and no less once they are found, as is the case in
than three men have been kept for years England, or by vesting its management,
in this sort of “secularized” relation to wholly or in part, in laymen of ascer-
the Church, who were afterward deemed tained and first-rate business talent, who
worthy to stand at the head of its minis- shall be under the supervision of the pre-
terial hosts as bishops—Emory, Waugh, sent clerical Book Committee. Any cler-
and Scott.

gyman of good sense, and little or no Originally, and for years, the minis- business experience, must certainly feel terial “Book Agent" did all the local stunned by a sudden introduction to such business of the Concern — the editing, varied and overwhelming responsibilities, (what little there was of it,) the pack and must naturally be afraid of any other ing of the books, the keeping of the ac- policy than one of extreme caution and counts, &c. For thirty years there was retrenchment-a policy very excellent in no clerk allowed him; and though selected some cases, but which with such capital from the conference ranks—from purely and such a market may cramp the noblest ministerial employments, and usually, if energies of the Concern, and be a real not invariably, without the business ex- though indirect and unperceived waste perience of which the management of ten of tens of thousands annually—of enough thousand dollars' worth of property could to pay, a score of times over, the best afford-he is suddenly placed in the midst salaries of the best lay b'siness men that of the largest business of the kind, save can be found. one instance, known in this country; the This is a digression, yet not an irrellargest, save two instances, known in the evant one; but be this as it may, and world—a business which includes hun- granting the best business talent in the dreds of artisans and clerks, hundreds world to Methodist preachers, we think of thousands of dollars, steam printing- the General Conference showed its good presses, binderies, a stereotype foundry, sense in calling from their money desks compositors, and dealers scattered over such men as Waugh, Emory, and Scott the continent! Rare resources of prac- l for the episcopal office.

cau

Bishop Scott was elected the first on seem to be next to impossible to give the list of the new candidates of 1852, offense. The suavity, the serenity, the and by the largest majority. He had done courtesy—the religious courtesy, if such well in the Book Concern along with his we may call it—of his manner in the venerable associate the Rev. George Lane, episcopal chair, will not admit of a misand had helped successfully to steady it interpretation, and no man could venture amidst the hurricane that swept over the to resent any of his official opinions or denomination at the division of the Church, decisions without feeling that he did an North and South.

act of as much disrespect to himself as He had been on the ministerial roll to his officer. It takes a genuine gentleduring a quarter of a century, and no man to impress a public body in this way, man in the connection stood before the and usually the “highest style” of that Church with a purer and more exem- character—the Christian gentleman. plary reputation. All felt, at his nom

Dr. Scott is tall and slight in person. ination, that there could be but one draw-His features are very regular, and inback to his election, and that was his dicate much refinement, both moral and health, which had been frail for years. intellectual. His hair is sandy and is His good sense and judgment, his integ- becoming slight; his craniological devel. rity to the Church, his prudence and opment full and intellectual, the organs of impartiality in the administration of its “perception,” “ comparison,” and “ government, his excellence as a dignified tion” being most prominent; his eyes are and impressive preacher, were all ac- dark blue; his nose large and well-formed; credited, without a doubt, and he passed his mouth remarkably well defined and into the episcopal chair with as much expressive of the refinement of sentiment approbation on the part of his brethren we have alluded to. Though Bishop Scott as modesty on his own part.

has not any preëminent reputation, that we Not long after his appointment, Dr. are aware of, as a preacher, his pulpit disScott made an episcopal visit to the Meth- courses are always good and impressive. odist missions in Africa ; the first visit of Thoughtful hearers usually return from the kind in the history of the Church. them pronouncing them “ excellent." His friends apprehended serious results They are clear, well framed, and expressto his health, from the well-known perils ed in a correct and chaste style; they are of the African climate, and he has suffer- often happily illustrated by figures ; there ed somewhat from it. While absent he is a fragrant unction about them which is seemed to improve much; but on return- always grateful and refreshing to devout ing, the insidious effects of the climate minds, and they never fail of the chief were developed, and his health has by no attribute of a good sermon-instruction. means been vigorous since. Still, it may Not unfrequently they rise to a tone of be hoped that the travels, required by his chastened power and grandeur; we have office, will repair his strength; and per- recollections of such sermons, delivered haps his friends may yet find that, like by him a full quarter of a century ago, most of his brother functionaries, the and which we shall never forget. usual rotundity of the episcopal physique Dr. Scott is self-educated, but not the shall dignify his official presence among less thoroughly educated on that account ; them. We think his improvement the his attainments are classical, and he was, more probable, as he is evidently a man as we have stated, the successful teacher, of calm self-control, and therefore, the for a period of three years, of the Grammental wear and tear of the office being mar School of Dickinson College. Thus its chief perils, he will be able to defend has he found, like many of his ministerial himself against them.

brethren, opportunities for mental culture No man could preside with more sim- amidst the toils of the Methodist itinerple and graceful dignity than Bishop ancy. Able and reliable, as he is unScott. He dispatches business—but is pretending, he cannot fail to sustain his never in a

hurry." Wesley had a good functions with success, if he can only maxim, of being always in haste but never sustain his health. in a hurry,—it is a requisite rule with The marked distinction of his whole Methodist bishops. Bishop Scott is one character, moral and intellectual, is its of those rare men with whom it would | perfect symmetry

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BESIDE yon straggling fence that skirts the way I knew him well, and every truant knew :
With blossom'd furze, unprofitably gay, Well had the boding tremblers learn'd to trace
There, in his noisy mansion, skill'd to rule, The day's disasters in his morning face :
The village master taught his little school : Full well they laugh’d with counterfeited glee
A man severe he was, and stern to view; At all his jokes, for many a joke had he;

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