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1870.

VOL. V.

1845.INC.1646#NO

PUBLISHED BY THE MASS. TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.

Vol. XXIII.

ORC. .

No. 2.

BOSTON:

SELWYN'S BUILDING, 366 WASHINGTON ST., ROOM 18.

Address editorial communications to EDITOR of MASS. TEACHER, Boston ;

letters relating to advertising to JOHN P. PAYSON, Chelsea ; those relating

NOW READY. EATON'S ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA. Designed for High Schools and Academies. By W. F. BRADBURY, Author of a Trigonometry and Surveying, and Teacher in Cambridge High School. Copies furnished for examination with reference to introduction on receipt of 60 cents.

The publishers present this volume to the educational public as a part of Eaton's Mathematical Series.

The acknowledged ability of the author as a mathematician and his practical experience as a teacher, peculiarly fit him to prepare a book of this grade.

It is thought that this work will surpass all others of a similar character in the following particularo:

1. Its superior mechanical execution.

2. Its brief and perspicuous method of stating principles and rules.

3. The omission of all topics not appropriate to an Elementary Algebra.

4. The arrangement of Equations in Elimination and the number and variety of examples throughout the work.

THE ELEMENTS OF ARITHMETIC. By James S. Eaton, M. A., Author of a series of Arithmetics.

188 pp. Retail price, 50 cents. It is the design of this work to present an outline of the most important principles of Arithmetic, special attention being given to the FUNDAMENTAL RULES, UNITED STATES MONEY, PERCENTAGE and the METRIC SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Teachers will find it a superior text-book for those pupils who have not time to pursue so full and complete a course in Written Arithmetic as is found in the larger books.

EATON'S ARITHMETICS
Contain -
The most clear and concise rules and definitions.
The most practical and business-like examples.
The most logical and satisfactory explanations.
The most approved presentation of the Metric System.

This Series is rapidly becoming the standard in the best schools throughout the country.

QUESTIONS ON THE PRINCIPLES OF ARITHMETIO. Designed to indicate an outline of study and to facilitate a thorough system of reviews. By J. 8. EATON, 15 cents.

BRADBURY'S TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. For High Schools and Academies. By W.F. BRADBURY, Cambridge. $1.50.

The attention of educators is invited to the following publications : Questions in Geography,

Worcester's History, The Universal Speaker,

Taylor's Classical Study,
Smellie's Philosophy of Natural History,
Philbrick's American Union Speaker.
Philbrick's Primary Union Speaker.
Philbrick's Primary School Tablets.

Descriptive catalogues sent on application to the Publishers.

Copies of Eaton's Arithmetics mailed, postage paid, for examination, on receipt of 13
cents for Primary, 20 cents for Intellectual, 45 cents for Common School, 60 cents for High
School, 50 cents for Grammar School, 25 cents for Elements.
Very liberal terms for first introduction.

THOMPSON, BIGELOW & BROWN,
(Successors to) TAGGARD & THOMPSON,

29 Cornhill, Boston.

Removed to 29 Cornhill,
At THOMPSON, BIGELOW & BROWN'S.

Our rule not to advertise by DETRACTION prevents us from answering in kind a recent attack in the advertising columns of this JOURNAL upon Guyot's Geographies, made by the publishers of WARREN's. We will show at our office, to those interested, a list of places in this vicinity which have recently discontinued the use of WARREN's Geographies (and the comments of such parties upon these books), embracing several large cities and several score of towns.

A QUESTION OF FACT, Was the old or new edition of Warren's Geography superseded by Guyot in

Newburyport? A statement lately published in the interest of Warren's Geographies, purporting to be a certiticate signed by me to the effect that Guyot's superseded the OLD edition of WARREN's Common School Geography, was never given por signed by me, to my best recollection and belief. The facts are, that both the old and the new edition of WARREY's book were in our schools; but the one in the beginning classes, and the one superseded, and the one compared with Guyot's, was THE NEW EDITION.

ISAAC P. NOYES, NEWBURYPORT, Oct. 25, 1869.

Sec'y of School Committee.

In March, 1869, Guyot's Geography superseded WARREN’s Common School, then in use in our schools. The exchange was made at my store, and to my knowledge many of the books exchanged were WARREN'S NEW EDITION of 1868. That book in fact was used by the beginning classes, and was considered in comparison with Guyot.

N. A. MOULTON,

Chairman of Board of School Committee. NEWBURYPORT, Oct. 25, 1869.

This will certify that I sold the new edition of Warren's Common School Geography for use in the schools of this city for nearly a year previous to the adoption of Guyor's series.

GEORGE W. CL RK, NEWBURYPORT, Oct. 25, 1869.

Bookseller.

On the 15th of March, 1869, I bought of Mr. G. H. Tucker, three hundred and twenty-seven copies of the New England edition of Warren's Common School Geography, that came from the schools of Newburyport, - about one half of which was the new edition of 1868.

N. J. BARTLETT, BOSTON, Oct. 22, 1869.

Bookseller.

“ SEE A VERY DIFFERENT STATEMENT " from the above in a late WARREN

advertisement.

GILMAN H. TUCKER,

New England Agent for Guyot's Geographies. At THOMPSON, BIGELOW & BROWN'S, 29 Cornhill, Boston.

THE RELATION OF HIGH SCHOOLS TO COLLEGES

• Page 39 SCHOOL-HOUSES

50 METHODS OF TEACHING CLASSICAL LANGUAGES.

55 THE CHINESE LANGUAGE..

58 THEORIES OF THE TIDAL WAVE.

60 THE UNITARY SYSTEM OF ANALYSIS......

63 EDITOR'S DEPARTMENT.—THE BUREAU OF EDUCATION, 64; TO DELIN

QUENT SUBSCRIBERS, 65; MEETING OF CLASSICAL AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS, 66; INTELLIGENCE, 67; A MUSEUM OF ART, 68; MECHANICAL DRAWING, 68; GOVERNOR CLAFLIN'S ADDRESS, 68; HARVARD UNIVER

70. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS .....

72 BOOK NOTICES. – THE MODEL SPEAKER, 73; READING AND ELOCUTION,

73; THE YOUNG COMPOSER, 74; THE HOLY GRAIL, 74; THE POETICAL WORKS OF ALFRED TENNYSON, 74; MEDORA LEIGH, 74; KITTY, 74; A

GERMAN COURSE, 74; MAGAZINES, 75. NOTICES..

76

SITY,

OTHER MAGAZINES. - Subscribers who pay in advance for the Massachusetts Teacher may order, through this Ofice, the following Magazines, at the prices indicated.

THE NATION. E. L. GODKIN, Publisher, New York. A Weekly Journal. $5.00 per annum, Our Subscribers, $4.00.

THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, devoted to Literature, Science, Art, and Politics. $4.00 per year. Our Subscribers, $3.00.

OUR YOUNG FOLKS: a Monthly, containing something in every juvenile department. $2.00 per year. Our subscribers, $1.50.

STUDENT AND SCHOOLMATE: a Monthly, devoted to pleasing Boys and Girls. $1.50 per year. Our Subscribers, $1.00.

OUR BOYS AND GIRLS: a popular Weekly Magazine, edited by Oliver Optic. $2.50 per year. Our Subscribers, $1.75.

THE NURSERY: a genuine child's Magazine, richly illustrated. Monthly. By Fannie P. Beaverns. $1.50 a year. We will send it to our subscribers for $1.00.

THE AMERICAN NATURALIST: the admirable Monthly of the Essex Institute, Salem. Adapted both to scientific and ordinary readers: it is neither below the one nor above the other. $4.00 per year. Our Subscribers, $3.00.

PUTNAM'S MAGAZINE (price $4.00) and Teacher, for $4.50.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE, WEEKLY, or BAZAR, $3.25 each.
LITTELL'S LIVING AGE, $6.75.

TERMS, Payable in Advance. - Single numbers, 15 cents.
Yearly subscriptions, $1.50.
Five copies, $6.25; Ten copies, $12.00, and each additional copy, $1.20.
Specimen copies furnished gratis to any wishing to subscribe.

Hr All communications relating to advertising must be sent before the 15th of the month preceding that of publication.

Address editorial communications to EDITOR of MASS. TEACHER, Boston; letters relating to advertising to JOHN P. PAYSON, Chelsea ; those relating to subscriptions to GEORGE K. DANIELL, Jr., Office of Mass. Teacher, Boston ; publishing, to D. W. JONES, Roxbury.

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BY PROF. WM. W. GOODWIN, OF CAMBRIDGE. [A paper read at the late meeting of the High School section of the State

Association, Oct. 22, 1869.] The question of university reform is every year assuming greater importance, but its discussion has been confined chiefly to academic bodies, and to those immediately interested in promoting higher scholarship. I shall attempt to show, in the present paper, that this question concerns also those who have charge of our High-school education, and that the High Schools must play an important part in carrying out any successful plan of university reform. What I have to say applies especially to those schools which are devoted mainly or entirely to preparing boys for college, and, with more or less qualification, to all High Schools.

It is only by a most absurd perversion of ideas, and completely losing sight of the purpose for which both school and college exist, that even a suspicion of mutual antagonism or diversity of interests could arise. The notion, for example, that a standard of admission to college can be so set as to be at the same time beneficial to the college and injurious to the school, is one which ought to need no refutation in an assembly of scholars. The best interests of sound learning - which are the same for both schools and colleges — should decide this question, and no subordinate interests should be considered. Indeed, where all the schools are under

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