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that more mental labor is required of many scholars, than they have physical strength to perform. Teachers expect their pupils to be as far advanced at twelve years of age as they themselves were at twenty. There was no necessity for this. Children would grow up to be useful and happy if they were not prodigies. Many come out of school enfeebled in body and unfitted for life's duties. It was better that the young man at twenty should be barely able to count his money, and reckon up his grocer's bill, and be robust, than that he should be a prodigy of learning at fifteen, and die at twenty.

The average age of scholars in the High School in Worcester is sixteen, and in the first grade of Grammar Schools fourteen. In the former school, scholars are pursuing three languages, and attending to two other branches of study also. It was intimated by the superintendent that the number of daily recitations is usually but three, and that some of the cases of loss of health might be explained by a careful inquiry into the pupils' habits of life; and broad hints were given in regard to evening parties, un wholesome diet, fashionable dressing, etc.

Several teachers of long experience in the city's service took part in the discussion, which assumed something of a conversational form, and although a few thought there were neither too large a number of studies nor too great an amount of study, the general conclusion was, that in nearly every school there are children whose parents would do well to look quite as closely to their physical development as to the accomplishment of the prescribed course of study in any given length of time. — Worcester Gazette.

A Good APPOINTMENT. -Mr. Thornton, the British minister at Washington, has been some months looking for a good mining engineer in this country, to be employed by the British government in surveying the petroleum regions of India, and to make borings there similar to the Pennsylvania oil wells. On the recommendation of Prof. Henry, Mr. Thornton has appointed Mr. Benjamin S. Lyman, of Philadelphia, formerly of Northampton, who will sail at once for India, by way of Europe, to be absent a year, at least, and perhaps two years. The oil regions of India are widely scattered, in Burmah, Siam, the Punjaub, and probably elsewhere, and the winter is the only good time for the work which Mr. Lyman has undertaken. He is one of the best mining engineers in America; is a graduate of Harvard College in the same class with his kinsman Theodore Lyman; and has since studied in the Frieburg mining school, and the Ecole des Mines at Paris, as well as had much practical experience in all parts of the United States and in Nova Scotia. The Indian government could not well have made a better selection, and we trust they will find out from Mr. Lyman that their petroleum can be brought into the market, and prove a profitable product.-Springfield Republican.

PSEUDONYMES. - Mr. Dole, in his “ Catalogue of the Skowhegan Library,” gives the following list of the pseudonymes of native and foreign authors, and names changed by marriage.

American: Bill Arp, Charles H. Smith ; Samuel A. Bard, Ephraim G. Squier; Walter Barrett, Joseph A. Scoville ; Benauly, Benjamin Austin and Lyman Abbott, jointly ; Carl Benson, Charles Astor Bristed; Cantell A. Bigly (Can tell a big lie), George W. Peck; Josh Billings, Henry W. Shaw; Dunn Browne, Rev. Samuel Fiske; Paul Creyton, J. T. Trowbridge; Shirley Dare, Miss Susan Dunning; Q. K. Philander Doesticks, Mortimer Thomson; Fat C ntributor, A. M. Griswold ; Major Jack Downing, Seba Smith; Fleeta, Kate W. Hamilton; Frank Forester, H. W. Herbert; Mrs. Gilman, Mr. Ballou; Howard Glyndon, Miss Laura C. Redden; Barry Gray, R. B. Coffin; Grace Greenwood, Mrs. Sarah J. C. Lippincott; Harry Gringo, Lt. Henry A. Wise, U. S. N.; Gail Hamilton, Miss Mary Abigail Dodge; Marion Harland, Mrs. M. V. Terhune ; Jennie June, Mrs. Jennie C. Croly; Orpheus C. Kerr (Office Seeker), R. H. Newell; Edmund Kirke, J. R. Gilmore; Sut Lovengood, Captain G. Harris; Helen Mar, Mrs. D. M. F. Walker; Ik Marvel, Donald G. Mitchell; Sophie May, Miss R. S. Clarke; Minnie Myrtle, Miss Anna L. Johnson ; Petroleum Vesuvius Nasby, D. R. Locke; Dr. Oldham, of Greystones, Caleb S. Henry, LL. D.; Oliver Optic, Wm. T. Adams ; Miles O'Reilly, Col. Chas. G. Halpine ; Mrs. Partington, B. P. Shillaber; Florence Percy, Mrs. Akers; John Phænix, Captain Geo. H. Derby, U. S. A.; Porte-Crayon, Gen. D. P. Strother; L. Pylodet (anagram), F. Leypoldt; Seeley Regester, Mrs. 0. J. Victor; Job Sass, Mr. - Foxcroft; De Kay Se (author of " Canetuckey"), Charles D. Kirk; Ethan Spike, Matthew F. Whittier; Talvi, Mrs. E. Robinson (Therese A. L. Von Jakob); Timothy Titcomb, Josiah G. Holland, M. D.; Trusta (anagram), Miss Elizabeth Stuart Phelps ; Mark Twain, Samuel L. Clemens; A Veteran Observer, E. D. Mansfield ; Artemus Ward, Charles F. Browne; Blythe White, Jr., Solon Robinson.

Foreign: A. L. 0. E. (A Lady of England), Miss Charlotte Tucker; Cuthbert Bede, Rev. Edward Bradley ; E. Berger, Miss Elizabeth Sheppard ; Bon Gaultier, Prof. W. E. Aytoun and Theodore Martin; Country Parson, “ A. K. H. B.,” Rev. A. K. H. Boyd; George Eliot, Mrs. Marian J. (Evans) Lewes ; Holme Lee, Mrs. Harriet Parr; Mrs. Markham, Mrs. Elizabeth Penrose; Owen Meredith, Hon. Edward R. B. Lytton ; Louise M hlbach, Mrs. Clara Mundt Nimrod, Charles J. Apperley; Old Humphrey, George Mogridge; George Sand, Amantine Lucile Aurore (Dupin Dudevant); January Searle, Geo. S. Phillips; Arthur Sketchley, Geo. Rose ; Samuel Slick, Judge Thomas C. Haliburton; Stonehenge, John H. Walsh ; Zadkiel, Lieut. Richard J. Morrison.

Names changed by marriage: Charlotte Bronte, Mrs. Nicholls; Augusta J. Evans, Mrs. Wilson ; Marian J. Evans, Mrs. G. H. Lewes; Caroline Fry, Mrs. Wilson ; Dinah Muloch, Mrs. Craik; Harriet J. Prescott, Mrs. R. G. Spofford.

IMPORTS.—The following statement issued by General Walker, Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, shows the aggregate value of imports into each customs district of the United States during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1869:

Gold value at foreign places of export. Alexandria, Va... $8,532 | Newark, N. J.

$7,711 Aroostook, Me. 13,736 New Bedford, Mass.

123,972 Alaska.... 21,709 Newburyport.

134,126 Baltimore, Md. 15,863,032 New Haven, Conn..

702,766 Bangor, Me.... 250,099 New London..

125,387 Bath..

29,351 New Orleans, La.. 11,414,893 Belfast. 38,515 Newport, R. I

39,492 Boston and Charlestown.. 44,636,967 Niagara, N. Y.

3,292,668 Brazos de Santiago, Texas 1,246,618 New York...

295,117,682 Bristol and Warren, R.I. 48,878 Norfolk & Portsmouth, Va. 205,591 Brunswick, Ga..

97,561 Oswegatchie, N.Y. 1,298,336 Buffalo Creek, N. Y... 2,820,628 Oswego..

6,591,223 Cape Vincent, N. Y 501,163 Oregon, Ore.

332,805 Castine, Me..... 6,773 Pamlico, N.C..

7,538 Champlain, N. Y 1,460,787 Passamaquoddy, Me ..

595,917 Charleston, S. C.

401,244 Passe del Norte, Texas.. 205,509 Chicago, Ii. 423,889 Pensacola, Fla..

3,180 Corpus Christi, Texas... 406,012 Perth Amboy, N.J.

26,685 Cuyaboga, 0.. 422,360 Petersburg, Va.

4,402 Delaware, Del.... 8,155 Philadelphia.

15,967,556 Detroit, Mich. 737,736 Plymouth, Mass.

1,512 Dunkirk, N. Y.

14,590 Providence, R. I...... 312,781 Erie, Pa...

61,935 Portland & Falmouth, Me. 2,923,216 Fairfield, Conn. 19,507 | Portsmouth, N. H..

9,755 Fall River, Mass.

129,228 | Puget Sound, W. T... 70,883 Fernandina, Fla.. 274 Richmond, Va..

41,214 Frenchman's Bay, Me... 154 Salem and Beverly, Mass. 270,764 Georgetown, D.Ć 7,417 Saluria, Texas..

124,878 Georgetown, s.c. 1,743 Sandusky, O...

28,562 Genesee, N. Y..

401,939 San Francisco, Cal. 18,088,901 Gloucester, Mass. 72,118 | Savannah, Ga....

748,977 Huron, Mich.... 808,610 St. John's, Fla.

9,661 Key West, Fla... 81,514 Stonington, Conn.

1,211 Machias, Me... 2,551 Superior, Mich..

18,544 Marblehead, Mass. 6,310 Texas, Tex..

266,517 Miami, O. 664,232 | Vermont, Vt....

5,832,205 Michigan, Mich. 978 Waldoboro', Me.

1,045 Milwaukee, Wis.. 100,401 Wilmington, N. C....

53,818 Minnesota, Minn. 76,509 Wiscasset, Me.

88 Mobile, Ala...

413,437 Nantucket, Mass.

675 | Total imports by districts, $437,309,868

BOOK NOTICES. A PAYSICIAN'S PROBLEMS. · By Charles Elam, M. D., M. R. C. P. Boston:

Fields, Osgood & Co.

A book of more than ordinary interest. It deals with those great questions which relate to man's interior organization, his moral and intellectual predispositions. All its conclusions may not be accepted, but they are worthy of earnest consideration. To the wise educator of the race, they supply motive, and give a truer conception of the work to be accomplished.

The subjects of the various chapters are as follows: Natural Heritage, On Degenerations in Man, On Moral and Criminal Epidemics, Body v. Mind, Illusions and Hallucinations, On Somnambulism, and Revery and Abstraction.

THE STORY OF A BAD Boy. By Thomas Bailey Aldrich. Boston: Fields,

Osgood & Co.

The readers of Our Young Folks have been delighted with this story, and have fallen in love with the bad boy," who was not a bad boy after all, but a “first-rate fellow," as one of them assures us. It is a natural, healthful story of a real boy, and finely told. It has had thousands of readers, and in its present shape will have thousands more. MIRTHFULNESS AND ITS EXCITERS ; or Rational Laughter and its Promoters,

By. Rev. B. F. Clark. Boston: Lee and Shepard.

Mr. Clark has been for thirty years pastor of the Congregational church in North Chelmsford. It is evident bis whole attention has not been absorbed in theology. He can laugh himself, and he believes in helping others to a good laugh. He says he has enjoyed preparing the book, and shall enjoy still more from it, if it only sells rapidly enough to give him a good income. May he have that enjoyment. His book will do good wherever it goes. We would suggest if he can only get hold of the good stories floating about in regard to teachers, he might add a new chapter to the next edition. THE B. O. W. C. By the author of the Dodge Club. Boston: Lee &

Shepard.

Another book for boys. The mysterious letters denote, “ The Brethren of the Order of the White Cross." The history of the Order and their remarkable experiences are detailed in that humorous and effective manner peculiar to the author of “The Dodge Club.” Boys will like it. SABBATH SONGS FOR CHILDREN'S WORSHIP. By Leonard Marshall, J. C.

Proctor, and Samuel Burnbam. Boston: Lee and Shepard.

This book has been prepared by gentlemen of musical ability, who have bad large experience in Sabbath Schools. They seem to have displayed good judgment in the selection of tunes and poetry. “ The Suggestive Exercises for Sunday School Concerts” are a new feature in a work of this kind. Songs OF GLADNESS FOR THE SABBATH School. By J. E. Gould. Philadel

phia: J. C. Carrigues & Co.

Excellent taste has also been displayed in this collection, both in the selection of music and appropriate words. It contains nearly six hundred hymns and tunes, and has been arranged to meet the wants of the various religious denominations. Haydn's DictioNARY OF DATES. Edited by Benjamin Vincent. Revised

for the use of American Readers. New York: Harper & Brothers.

This work first appeared in 1841. In 1866, a new edition, thoroughly revised by Benjamin Vincent, Assistant Secretary and Keeper of the Library of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, was issued. Later additions and corrections were added at the end of the volume. The work has now passed through the hands of competent American editors, who have incorporated these additions into the body of the work, and also much new matter, continuing its chronology to the present time.

The present edition of the work is therefore the fullest and most complete that has appeared. It is exceedingly valuable to the student, and should have a place among the reference books in our High and Grammar schools. THE ODES AND EPODES OF HORACE. A metrical translation into English,

with Introduction and Commentaries. Witb Latin text from the editions of Orelli, Macleane, and Yonge. By Lord Lytton. New York: Harper & Brothers.

Aside from the interest attaching to the mere metrical translation of these odes, which interest is by no means small, this work will be sought by classical teachers and scholars for the historical information and critical observations it gives in regard to them. The lovers of Horace will not be disappointed in its keen appreciation of their author's charms. As a specimen of translation, we give the first stanza of Ode IX. Book I. Vides ut alta stet nive candidum, etc.

See how wbite in the deep-fallen snow stands Soracte !
Laboring forests no longer can bear up their burden ;
And the rush of the rivers is locked,

Halting mute in the grip of the frost.
OLD TESTAMENT SHADOWS OF New TESTAMENT Truths. By Lyman

Abbott. With designs by Doré, Delaroche, Durham, and Parsons. New York: Harper & Brothers.

The Old Dispensation foreshadowed the New. A spiritual meaning underlies its historic events. In these days of material progress and scientific discovery, there is but little searching for “the deep things of God.” Wbatever leads us into the spiritual meaning of things is therefore to be welcomed. This is a very handsome volume, and will ornament the centre-table as well as gladden the heart. WILD SPORTS OF THE WORLD. By James Greenwood. New York: Harper

& Brothers.

An account of the strongest and fiercest animals, and modes of hunting them. “ Wild sports” indeed! Exciting scenes and perilous adventure! It is a very enticing book, with its one hundred and forty-seven illustrations, and is as good as a menagerie. It affords much accurate information in regard to the animal world, LOST IN THE JUNGLE. Narrated for Young People. By Paul Du Chaillu. New

York: Harper & Brothers.

Those who have been in the “ Gorilla Country” with Paul du Chaillu, or have enjoyed with him “ Wild Sports under the Equator," will be ready to undertake this new journey into the African jungles. We do not wonder at the avidity with which his books are read. HENRY ESMOND, AND LOVEL THE WIDOWER. By William Makepeace

Thackeray. With illustrations by the author. COUNTESS GISELA. By E. Marlitt. Translated from the German by A

Nahmer. THE CLOISTER AND THE HEARTH; or Maid, Wife, and Widow. By Charles

Reade.

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