Imagens da página
PDF
ePub

opportunity of making themselves agreeably acquainted with the great music-masters of the world. This volume not only entertains but instructs. Other volumes will follow.

DIALOGUES FROM DICKENS. For School and Home Amusement. Arranged by W. Eliot Fette. This volume has been before the public but a short time, yet has been so favorably received that the publishers are obliged to issue a new edition. It contains forty-five dialogues, with an index to characters and costumes. They afford good scope for dramatic talent, and are sure to entertain.

A. S. BARNES & Co., New York, send us some new school-books which seem to us worthy the attention of teachers.

THE AMERICAN BOTANIST AND FLORIST: including Lessons in the Structure, Life, and Growth of Plants; together with a Simple Analytical Flora By Alphonso Wood. The principles of the science are here presented in concise form. Each chapter is followed with a synoptical statement of its contents, an important aid to the student. The Flora contains the description of nearly 4,000 species, — all the known flowering plants, native and cultivated, of the Atlantic half of the United States. The book makes its appearance at a very opportune season, and will be the means, we hope, of introducing many to this most interesting of sciences. As a text-book, it reflects great credit on author and publishers.

THE FRENCH Echo; or Dialogues to teach French Conversation with an adequate vocabulary. Edited by James H. Worman. This is, in the main, a reprint of L'Echo de Paris, a work very popular on the other side of the water. Its design is to enable the student to obtain a vocabulary of French words and phrases, such as are used in business, in society, and in the common conversation of the day. It seems to us much superior to the conversation books in general use.

ANSWERS TO THE PRACTICAL QUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS contained in the Fourteen Weeks' Courses in Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Astronomy. By J. Dorman Steele. A small book of eighty pages, which may be of some advantage to teachers. It gives practical information, and directions for performing experiments in chemistry.

CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co., New York, continue the publication of their Illustrated Library of Wonders, an extremely interesting and instructive, series of works.

THE SUN. By Amédée Guillemin. From the French, by A. L. Phipson. With fifty-eight illustrations. The sun as the source of light, heat chemical action; its influence, distance, motions, spots, eclipses, and all its phenomena, are here described in an intelligent and popular manner.

WONDERS OF GLASS-MAKING in all ages. By A. Sauzay. With sixtythree engravings. From the glass-makers of Thebes to the glass-makers

of the present time, the progress of this wonderful art is here described; all its processes, from the manufacture of common bottles to the most delcate and artistic ornaments. Full of interest.

THE SUBLIME IN NATURE; compiled from the descriptions of travellers and celebrated writers. By Ferdinand de Lanoye. Fifty illustrations. This includes the phenomena of the atmosphere, of the ocean;'a description of mountains, volcanoes, rivers, waterfalls, caves, vegetation, etc.

A LATIN GRAMMAR for the use of schools. By I. N. Madvig. Translated by the Rev. George Woods. Revised and partially 'retranslated by Thomas A. Thacher, professor of Latin in Yale College. Boston: Ginn Brothers & Co.

Scholars and teachers will be glad to welcome this new edition of one of the most useful books of reference on Latin grammar. We understand that Professor Thacher has been long and faithfully at work upon this revision, and the result of his labors seems to leave nothing to be desired.

Certainly no more competent hand could have been set to the work. The publishers, too, have given us another specimen of what may be called almost, if not quite, absolute perfection in school-book literature, the general appearance of the book in type and binding being like that of Allen's Latin Grammar, issued by the same publishers. This volume contains a copious index, without which any book of reference is well nigh valueless. The grammar per se is so 'well known that it needs no recommendation or extended review from us.

NEW SYSTEM OF VENTILATION. By Henry A. Gouge. New York: D. Van Nostrand. The author's Atmospheric Ventilator creates a current by means of an argand burner. It has been applied to hotels, churches, public offices, school and dwelling-houses with the most satisfactory results. The book before us is mainly devoted to an account of what it has accomplished

THE NATIONAL PRIMARY SCHOOL SLATES. Nos. 1 and 2. W. A. Wilde & Co., No. 1 Cornhill, Boston, have very neat slates for primary school use. No. 1 has patterns for drawing in straight and curved lines, and copies for printing. No. 2 gives exercises in script hand, and a very systematically arranged series of drawing lessons.

This firm do a large business in slates. They have a nice way of fixing a piece of rubber on each corner of the frame, so that a slate may even fall to the floor without exciting the nerves of the teacher. This adds but a trifle to the cost.

SPENCERIAN COPY Books. Ivison, Phinney, Blakeman & Co., New York. Intermediate. This is a new book containing all the letters, small and capital, with a part of the page so ruled as to regulate their relative length. The copies present a good style of letter, and are handsomely engraved.

(OR PART II.)

AND PRONOUNCING SPELLER,

Sargent's Standard Fifth or First Class Reader. 12mo, half morocco........

... ..... 528 pages. Sargent's Standard Fourth Reader. 12mo, half morocco, 336 « Sargent's Intermediate Reader, 12mo, half morocco, beautifully illustrated

... 264 Sargent's Standard Third Reader. 12mo, half morocco.. 216 Sargent's Standard Second Reader. Illustrated....... Sargent's Standard First Reader. Illustrated........... 120 Sargent's Standard Primer. Finely illustrated........... 72 “ Sargent's Pronouncing Speller. An entirely new work, and very successful....

........... 168 “ This Speller illustrates the unaccented vowel sounds by a new system of notation; and contains an entirely new feature in an Index of peculiar words for exhibition exercises, etc., which supersedes the necessity of any supplementary Speller for higher classes. It is also adapted to beginners.

THE FIFTH READER

Contains an ORIGINAL ELOCUTIONARY INTRODUCTION of an eminently concise and practical character, treating in a thorough manner those vital principles which are essential to successful instruction.

The selections comprise the best elocutionary pieces which Literature affords.

In the other Numbers of the Series the subject of Elocutionary Drill is prominently and appropriately treated, and the Reading Exercises are selected with especial reference to their adaptedness for Elocutionary Practice.

PATRIOTIC PIECES, embracing the noblest sentiments of modern statesmen and authors, are included, to inspire a devoted spirit of patriotism, an intelligent faith in our republican system, and a renewed confidence in our purified institutions.

In all respects the Series is fully UP WITH THE TIMES.

SARGENT'S ORIGINAL DIALOGUES. $1.50.

A handsome large duodecimo of 336 pages, with a fine portrait of the author, engraved on steel, and wood-cuts representing appropriate attitudes in dialogue delivery. Copies sent, post-paid, on receipt of price.

LIBERAL TERMS GIVEN FOR INTRODUCTION.
Address the Publisher,

JOHN L. SHOREY,

WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. tư (1)

[graphic][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small]

SCHOOL CHAIRS, DESKS, AND TEACHERS' DESKS AND TABLES,

CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
SCHOLARS' DESKS ND CHIRS MADE TO ORDER.
All articles warranted. Catalogues furnished, with prices, on application by mail, by sending five cents for return postage.

Jan. 30—51

[graphic][merged small]
[graphic]

1. NEW PRIMARY ARITHMETIC.
2. NEW ELEMENTARY ARITHMETIC.
3. NEW INTELLECTUAL ARITHMETIC.
4. NEW PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC.

6. NEW ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA.
6. NEW HIGHEB ALGEBRA.
7. ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY.
8. ELEMENTS OF TRIGONOMETRY.

Works which, by force of intrinsic merit, and in spite of unfavorablo competition, aro moet. ing with extraordinary success in all parts of the country. GREENLEAF'S PRACTICAL SURVEYING AND NAVIGATION. (In preparation.]

Greenleaf's New Arithmetics and Elementary Algebra Are adopted to be used in all the Public Schools of Vermont for a term of five years.

IFGREENLEAF'S NEW SERIES, in whole or part, has been adopted within two years for eleven STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS, and for the Public Schools of more than TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY CITIES AND TOWNS.

GREENLEAF'S NEW ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA, GEOMETRY, and TRIGONOMETRY, are so generallly used and favorably known as to be their own commendation.

GREENLEAF'S NEW HIGHER ALGEBRA is used in MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BROWN UNIVERSITY, AMHERST COLLEGE, BOWDOIN COLLEGE, WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Ct., MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, MASSACHUSETTS TECHNICAL SCHOOL, Worcester; PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Exeter, and other institutions.

GREENLEAF'S COMMON BCHOOL AND NATIONAL ARITHMETICS, containing the METRIC SYSTEM OF WEIGUTS AND MEASURES, continue to be published, and will always be kept up with the times.

GREENLEAF'S SYSTEM, in whole or in part, 18 now used in upwards of 1,000 CITIER AND TOWNS IN THE EASTERN STATEs, and in the PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NEW YORK CITY, and all the best PRIVATE SCOOLS IN PHILADELPHIA, BALTIMORE, and other cities.

From many hundreds of testimonials, to the high character of GREENLEAF'S MATHEMATI. CAL SERIES, from prominent Educators, there is space for only a few as specimens :

(FROM REV. MR. GANNETT, PRINCIPAL OF THE POPULAR SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIER.)

As a matter of preference, I have for several years used tho MATHEMATICAL SERIES of Prof. Greenleaf. With the NEW ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA I am especially pleased.

GEO. GANNETT,

Principal of School for Young Ladies, Chester Park, Boston. I have always liked GREENLEAF'S SERIES OF ARITHMETICS. The improvements contained in the NEW PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC, comprising, among others, the Metric System of Weights and Measures, make it, in my estimation, one of the very best books before the public.

W. L. P. BOARDMAN, Principal Lewis Grammar School, Boston. In my opinion, GREENLEAF'S ARITUMETICS form the most complete series ever published in this, or in any other country, and are worthy of the patronage obtained in every State in the Union. His NEW ALGEBRAS are in constant use in our school, and commend themselves. We have now a large class in GREENLEAF'S GEOMETRY. I am satisfied that it possesses many excellences.

J. C. GREENOUGH, Instructor in Mathematics, State Normal School, Westfield, Mass. GREENLEAF'S NEW ALGEBRA has been adopted as a text-book in this school. It is now used in several classes, and gives good satisfaction. I most cheerfully recommend the work.

A. P. STONE, Principal of Public High School, Portland, Me. It gives me pleasure to state that we use GREENLEAF's entire Series of Mathematics, and that as a series I consider them unsurpassed by any now in ure.

J. B. CHASE Prof. Mathematics, Russell's Collegiate Home Institute, New Haven, Ct. We use GREENLEAF'S ENTIRE MATHEMATICAL SERIES in our schools, and I do not think these books will soon be superseded. THEY ARE DECIDEDLY MASTERS OF THE FIELD. I regard them as trusty friends and companions in the work of instruction.

CARLOS SLAFTER, Principal of High School, Dedham, Mass. School Officers and Teachers contemplating changes in Arithmetic, Algebra, or Geometry, are invited to correspond freely with us, and send for Descriptive Catalogue. Liberal terms given on books furnished for examination, or for introduction in place of inferior books.

ROBERT S, DAVIS & CO., Publishers, Boston.

« AnteriorContinuar »