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ance of domestic duties. As the process of working it into young ladies' schools will be slow, we hope it will find its way into every family at once. It will settle the great “domestic difficulty" by making every woman a good housekeeper, a good nurse, a good mother, a good Christian. It is sound and practical.

The book closes with an address from the senior author to the Female Teachers of her country, asking their aid in an effort to raise still higher the influence and remuneration of their profession. It is proposed to establish an institution for training young ladies in the performance of the practical duties of life. The plan embraces several departments, one of which will be the Health Department. To the endowment of that will be devoted the profits arising from the sale of this book. Teachers may obtain a copy by enclosing one dollar and their address to J. B. Ford & Co., 39 Park Row, New York City. REMOVING MOUNTAINS. By John S. Hart. New York: Robert Carter &

These life-lessons from the gospels are worthy of thoughtful perusal. Fifty-two short sermons we might call them, though they are not in sermonizing style. The thought is seized, brought out, or the picture is strikingly presented; and that is all. “Removing Mountains,” “Martha and Mary," “ Lacking,” “ Christ the Door,” “ Doing and Knowing,” etc., are the subjects. We are glad the publishers have given so good a book an attractive appearance.

ANDREWS & STODDARD'S LATIN GRAMMAR. School edition. Prepared by J.

H. Andrews, assisted by eminent teachers. Boston: Crocker & Brewster.

This is an epitome of the authors' larger grammar, and contains all that is needed by the student in his preparatory course. The numbers of the sections in the larger work have been retained that the references in the works of various authors may correspond to the sections in this grammar. It will be found well adapted to the wants of our schools.

FIRST STEPS IN MUSIC. Second book. By George B. Loomis, Indianapolis.

A few months ago, we noticed the appearance of the first book, and are glad to see the same principle of one thing at a time carried out still further in this second book. The steps are very short, and certainly most primary teachers will have no difficulty in teaching their scholars how to take them. We welcome every attempt of this kind to simplify the teaching of music. It should be early taught and well taught.

(OR PART II.)

AND PRONOUNCING SPELLER.

Sargent's Standard Fifth or First Class Reader. 12mo, half morocco...

... 528 pages. Sargent's Standard Fourth Reader. 12mo, half morocco, 336 " Sargent's Intermediate Reader. 12mo, half morocco, beautifully illustrated ........

.................... 264 16 Sargent's Standard Third Reader. 12mo, half morocco.. 216 " Sargent's Standard Second Reader. Illustrated ......... 216 Sargents Standard First Reader. Illustrated ........... 120 Sargent's Standard Primer. Finely illustrated........... 72 “ Sargent's Pronouncing Speller. An entirely new work, and very successful...

............ 168 " This Speller illustrates the unaccented vowel sounds by a new system of notation; and contains an entirely new feature in an Index of peculiar words for exhibition exercises, etc., which supersedes the necessity of any supplementary Speller for higher classes. It is also adapted to beginners.

THE FIFTH READER

Contains an ORIGINAL ELOCUTIONARY INTRODUCTION of an eminently concise and practical character, treating in a thorough manner those vital principles which are essential to successful instruction.

The selections comprise the best elocutionary pieces which Literature affords.

In the other Numbers of the Series the subject of Elocutionary Drill is prominently and appropriately treated, and the Reading Exercises are selected with especial reference to their adaptedness for Elocutionary Practice.

PATRIOTIC PIECES, embracing the noblest sentiments of modern statesmen and authors, are included, to inspire a devoted spirit of patriotism, an intelligent faith in our republican system, and a renewed confidence in our purified institutions.

SARGENT'S ORIGINAL DIALOGUES. $1.50.

A handsome large duodecimo of 336 pages, with a fine portrait of the author, engraved on steel, and wood-cuts representing appropriate attitudes in dialogue delivery. Copies sent, post-paid, on receipt of price.

LIBERAL TERMS GIVEN FOR INTRODUCTION.
Address the Publisher,

JOHN L. SHOREY,

WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. til

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SCHOOL FURNITURE,

108 Fulton Street, Boston.

ESTABLISHED 1840.

SCHOOL CHAIRS, DESKS, AND TEACHERS' DESKS AND TABLES,

CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
SCHOLARS' DESKS AND CHAIRS MADE TO ORDER.
All articles warranted. Catalogues furnished, with prices, on application by mail, by sending five cents for return postage.

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MADVIG'S LATIN GRAMMAR.

By Thomas A. THACHER, Yale Collego. The most valuable treatise on the language yet published. Price, to teachers, $2.00.

ALLEN'S LATIN PRIMER.

A First Book of Latin for Boys and Girls. By J. H. ALLEN. PART I., containing an outline of Grammar in thirty progressive lessons; illustrated by easy narrative (History, Sacred). PART II., consisting of Dialogues (Latin and English), and selections for Reading, with Vocabulary; about 150 pages.

Allen's Latin Grammar. By W. F. & J. H. ALLEN. $1.25. Recommended by Harvard College, as indicating the amount required for admission.

Allen's Latin Lessons. $1.25. Allen's Latin Reader. $2.50.
Allen's Latin Lexicon (complete). $1.25.
Allen's Latin Composition (to be issued in April).
Craik's English of Shakespeare. $1.75. By W. J. ROLFE.

From the Harvard Catalogue for 1869-70: “ For 1870, students may prepare themselves in CRAIK'S ENGLISH OF SHAKESPEARE, or in Milton's Comus."

Our World; or First Lessons in Geography. Revised edition, with new maps. By MARY L. Hall. 90c. Anderson's United States and General Histories. GINN BROS. & Co., Publishers,

13 Beacon Street, BOSTON.

STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS,

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The Normal Schools at Framingham and Salem are designed for the education of female teachers; those at Bridgewater and Westfield, for the education of teachers of both sexes.

The course of study commonly occupies two years, or four terms, each term including nine teen weeks of school time and one week of recess. The course for college graduates is com pleted in one term. A person of marked ability and extraordinary acquirements may obtain a degree, in any one of the schools, in three-fourths, or even one-half of the time usually required.

To those who intend to teach in the public schools of Massachusetts, wherever they have previously resided, tuition is free; and to pupils from this state, pecuniary aid is given, when needed. Most of the text-books required are furnished gratuitously from the libraries of the several schools.

THE PUBLIC EXAMINATIONS will take place as follows:

At FRAMINGHAM, on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 1869, and July 6, 1869.
At Salem, on Thursday, Jan. 21, 1869, and July 8, 1869.
At BRIDGEWATER, on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1869, and July 13, 1869.
AL WESTFIELD, on Thursday, Jan. 28, 1869, and July 15, 1869.

THE EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION will take place as follows:

At FRAMINGHAM, on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1869, and Aug. 31, 1869.
At SALEM, on Thursday, Feb. 18, 1869, and Sept. 2, 1869.
At BRIDGEWATER, on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1869, and Sept. 7, 1869.
At WESTFIELD, on Thursday, Feb. 25, 1869, and Sept. 9, 1869,

NEW SERIES OF GEOGRAPHIES.

COMPLETE IN THREE BOOKS, THE PRIMARY, THE COMMON SCHOOL, THE PHYSICAL.

COWPERTHWAIT & Co., Publishers, Philadelphia,

This Series has recently been thoroughly revised, and it presents the whole subject of Geography in a state of complete adaptation to all grades of schools, not to be found in the same pumber of books in any other series. Hence, in point of expense, and in the time required to master the subject of which it treats, WARREN'S SERIES IS THE MOST ECONOMICAL OF ANY BEFORE THE PUBLIC.

WARREN'S GEOGRAPHIES, based upon the ideas of Ritter and Humboldt, WERE THE FIRST TO POPULARIZE THE SUBJECT OF PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY in the public schools of this country, to make it the basis of all Geographical teaching, to impress upon the subject a philosophical arrangement of dependent topics, to infuse into it a scientific unity and connection of thought, and thus to lift the science above a lifeless summary of facts about countries and cities.

The superiority of the method pursued in these books is fully demonstrated by their long continued use, and re-adoption as fast as revised, in such leading cities as Boston, Mass. | Nashua, N. H. | Erie City, Pa. New Bedford,

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Washington, D. C.
Schenectady,

Chicago, Ill.
Fall River,
Utica,

Si. Louis, Mo.
Chelsea,

Philadelphia, Pa. Nashville, Tenn. Concord, N. H. 1 Allentown,

Omaha, Neb. Providence, R. I. I Chester,

Racine, Wis. Newport, 66 Altoona,

Burlington, Iowa, And in Hundreds of other cities and Towns throughout the United States.

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TEACHERS AND SCHOOL OFFICERS Must examine these New Books If they wish to keep up with the times. Copies for examination, and terms for introduction, furnished on application to the Publishers, or to

DEXTER S. STONE, General Agent, 37 & 39 BRATTLE ST., BOSTON.

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