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NEWGATE'S GARLAND :

Being a new Ballad, showing how Mr. Jonat Throat was cut from Ear to Ear, with a Penk, Blake, alias Blueskin, the bold Highwayman, at his Trial in the Old Bailey, 1725.

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YE gallants of Newgate, whose fingers are
In diving in pockets, or cogging of dice;
Ye sharpers so rich, who can buy off the r
Ye honester poor rogues, who die in your
Attend and draw near,
Good news ye shall hear,
How Jonathan's throat was cut from ear to
How Blueskin's sharp penknife hath set yo
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if he p

II.

When to the Old Bailey this Blueskin was
He held up his hand; his indictment was
Loud rattled his chains: near him Jonath
For full forty pounds was the price of his
Then, hopeless of life,
He drew his penknife,
And made a sad widow of Jonathan's wis
But forty pounds paid her, her grief shal
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if he

III.

Some say there are courtiers of highest renown,
Who steal the king's gold, and leave him but a crown:
Some say there are peers and parliament men,
Who meet once a year to rob courtiers again.
Let them all take their swing,
To pillage the king,
And get a blue riband instead of a string.
Now Blueskin's sharp penknife hath set you at case,
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if he please.

IV.

Knaves, of old, to hide guilt by their cunning in

ventions, Call'd briberies grants, and plain robberies pensions: Physicians and lawyers (who take their degrees To be learned rogues) call'd their pilfering fees.

Since this happy day

Now ev'ry man may
Rob (as safe as in office) upon the highway.
For Blueskin's sharp penknife hath set you at ease,
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if he please.

V.

Some cheat in the Customs, some rob the Excise:
But he who robs both is esteemed most wise.
Churchwardens too prudent to hazard the halter,
As yet only venture to steal from the altar.
But now, to get gold,
They may be more bold,
And rob on the highway since Jonathan's cold:
For Blueskin's sharp penknife hath set you at ease,
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if he please.
VI. Some

VI.

Some by publick revenues, which pas
hands,
Have purchas'd clean houses, and boug
Some to steal from a charity think it n.
Which at home (says the proverb) doe
But if ever you be
Assign'd a trustee,
Treat not orphans like masters of the (
But take the highway, and more hones
For ev'ry man round me may rob, if h

VII.

What a pother has here been with Woo
Who would modestly make a few half;
The patent is good, and the precedent
For Diomede changed his copper for g
But, if Ireland despise
The new halfpennies,
With more safety to rob on the road I
For Blueskin's sharp penknife hath set
And ev'ry man round me may rob, if

STREPHON AND FLA

WITH ev'ry lady in the land
Soft Strephon kept a pother ;

One year he languish'd for one hand,
And next year for the other.

Yet, when his love the shepherd told To Flavia fair and coy,

Reserv'd, demure, than snow more cold,
She scorn'd the gentle boy.

Late at a ball he own'd his pain:
She blush'd, and frown'd, and swore,

With all the marks of high disdain,
She'd never hear him more.

The swain persisted still to pray,
The nymph still to deny;

At last she vow'd she would not stay;
He swore she should not fly.

Enrag'd, she call'd her footman straight,
And rush'd from out the room,

Drove to her lodging, lock'd the gate,
And lay with Ralph at home.

THE QUIDNUNCKIS:

A TALE OCCASIONED BY THE DEATH OF THE DUKE REGENT OF FRANCE.

HOW vain are mortal man's endeavours
(Said, at dame Elleot's", master Travers)
Good Orleans dead in truth 'tis hard :
O ! may all statesmen die prepar'd
I do foresee (and for foreseeing
He equals any man in being)
The army ne'er can be disbanded.
—I wish the king were safely landed.
Ah friends' great changes threat the land!
All France and England at a stand

* Coffeehouse, near St. James's.

There's

There's Meroweis—mark strange v And there's the czar, and there's the The pope—an India merchant by Cut short the speech with this reply: All at a stand 2 you see great chan Ah, sir! you never saw the Ganges: There dwells the nation of Quidnunck (So Monomotapa calls monkeys:) On either bank, from bough to boug They meet and chat (as we may now Whispers go round, they grin, they s. They bow, they snarl, they scratch, t And, just as chance or whim provoke They either bite their friends, or strok There have I seen some active prig. To show his parts, bestride a twig: Lord! how the chatt’ring tribe admire Not that he's wiser, but he's higher: All long to try the vent'rous thing (For pow'r is but to have one's swing. From side to side he springs, he spur And bangs his foes and friends by turr Thus, as in giddy freaks he bounces, * Crack goes the twig, and in he flounc Down the swift stream the wretch is b Never, ah never, to return Z ds ! what a fall had our dear Morbleu !” cries one; and “ damm The nation gives a gen'ral screech ; None cocks his tail, none claws his b Each trembles for the publick weal, And for a while forgets to steal. A while all eyes, intent and steady Pursue him whirling down the eddy :

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