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THE world is much indebted to the fimous sir Humphry Polesworth for his ingenious and impartial account of John Bull's lawsuit; yet there is just CallSC of complaint against him, in that he relate*k only by parcels, and won't give us the whole work: this forces me, who am only the publisher, to bespeak the assistance of his friends and acquaintance, to engage him to lay aside that stingy humour, and gratify the curiosity of the public at once. He pleads in excuse, that they are only private memoirs, written for his own use, in a loose style, to serve as a help to his ordinary conversation *. I represented to him the good reception the First Part had met with ; that though calculated only for the meridian of Grub-street, it was yet taken notice of by the

* This excuse of sir Humphry can only relate to the Second Part, or sequel of the history. See the Preface to the First Part,

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THE world is much indebted to the famous sir Humphry Polesworth for his ingenious and impartial account of John Bull's lawsuit; yet there is just cause of complaint against him, in that he relate* only by parcels, and won't give us the whole work: this forces me, who am only the publisher, to bespeak the assistance of his friends and acquaintance, to engage him to lay aside that stingy humour, and gratify the curiosity of the public at once. He pleads in excuse, that they are only private memoirs, written for his own use, in a loose style, to serve as a help to his ordinary conversation *. I represented to him the good reception the First Part had met with ; that though calculated only for the meridian of Grub-street, it was yet taken notice of by the better sort; that the world was now sufficiently acquainted with John Bull, and interested itself in his concerns. He answered, with a smile, that he had indeed some trifling things to impart, that concerned John Bull's relations and domestic affairs; if these would satisfy me, he gave me free leave to make use of them, because they would serve to make the history of the lawsuit more intelligible. When I had looked over the manuscript, I found likewise some farther account of the composition, which perhaps may not be unacceptable to such as have read the former part.

* This excuse of sir Humphry can only relate to the Second Part, or sequel of the history. Sce the Preface to the First

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CHAP. I.

The character of John Bull's mother ".

JOHN had a mother, whom he loved and honoured extremely, a discreet, grave, sober, good conditioned, cleanly old gentlewoman as ever lived; she was none of your crossgrained, termagant, scolding jades, that one had as good be hanged as live in the house with, such as are always censuring the conduct, and telling scandalous stories of their neighbours, extolling their own good qualities, and undervaluing those of others. On the contrary, she was of a meek spirit, and as she was strictly virtuous herself, so she always put the best construction upon the words and actions of her neighbours, except where they were irreconcilable

* The church of England.
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to the rules of honesty and decency. She was neither one of your precise prudes, nor one of your fantastical old belles, that dress themselves like girls of fifteen : as she neither wore a ruff, forehead cloth, nor high crowned hat, so she had laid aside feathers, flowers, and crimped ribands, in her headdress, furbelow-scarfs, and hoop-petticoats. She scorned to patch and paint, yet she loved to keep her hands and her face clean. Though she wore no flaunting laced ruffles, she would not keep herself in a constant sweat with greasy flannel: though her hair was not stuck with jewels, she was not ashamed of a diamond cross ; she was not like some ladies, hung about with toys and trinkets, tweezer-cases, pocket glasses, and essence bottles; she used only a gold watch and an almanack, to mark the hours and the holidays. Her furniture was neat and genteel, well fancied with a bon goust. As she affected not the grandeur of a state with a canopy, she thought there was no offence in an elbowchair; she had laid aside your carving, gilding, and japanwork, as being too apt to gather dirt; but she never could be prevailed upon to part with plain wainscot and clean hangings. There are some ladies, that affect to smell a stink in every thing; they are always highly perfumed, and continually burning frankincense in their rooms; she was above such affectation, yet she never would lay aside the use of brooms and scrubbing-brushes, and scrupled not to lay her linen in fresh lavender. She was no less genteel in her behaviour, wellbred, without affectation, in the due mean between one of your affected curt’sying pieces of formality, and your romps that have no regard to the common rules of civility. There are some ladies that affect a

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