A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations, Volume 21

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1816
 

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Página 711 - Statutes in that case made and provided, and against the peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, his crown, and dignity.
Página 545 - I hope will be particular, and do no injury to the property of any true Protestant. I am well assured that the proprietor of this house is a staunch and worthy friend to the cause. "GEORGE GORDON." "What's this!" said the locksmith, with an altered face. "Something that'll do you good service, young feller," replied his journeyman, "as you'll find.
Página 623 - ... what, but the inversion of all justice, by judging from consequences, instead of from causes and designs? what, but the artful manner in which the Crown has endeavoured to blend the petitioning in a body, and the zeal with which an animated disposition conducted it, with the melancholy crimes that followed ? crimes, which the shameful indolence of our magistrates — which the total extinction of all police and government suffered to be committed in broad day, and in the delirium of drunkenness,...
Página 491 - II. st. 1, c. 5, that no petition to the king, or either house of parliament, for alteration of matters established by law in church or state...
Página 499 - Columbia, laborer, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil...
Página 855 - Also in such case where the inquest may give their verdict at large, if they will take upon them the knowledge of the law upon the matter, they may give their verdict generally as it is put in their charge...
Página 653 - That it is the right of the subjects to petition the king ; and all commitments and prosecutions for such petitioning are illegal.
Página 619 - ... provoked? No! But since, notwithstanding a public protest issued by himself and the association, reviling the authors of mischief, the Protestant cause was still made the pretext, he thought his public exertions might be useful, as they might tend to remove the prejudices which wicked men had diffused. The king thought so likewise, and therefore (as appears by Lord Stormont) refused to see Lord George till he had given the test of his loyalty by such exertions. But sure I am, our gracious sovereign...
Página 493 - But every insurrection which in judgment of law is intended against the person of the King, be it to dethrone or imprison him, or to oblige him to alter his measures of Government, or to remove evil counsellors round about him, — these risings all amount to levying war within the statute ; whether attended with the pomp and circumstances of open war or not.
Página 597 - ... with a torch in his hand, not only in the very act of destroying one of them, but leading on his followers, in person, to the avowed destruction of all the rest. There could therefore be no doubt of his purpose and intention, nor any great doubt that the perpetration of such purpose was, from its generality, high treason, if perpetrated by such a force as distinguishes a felonious riot from a treasonable levying of war. The principal doubt therefore in that case was, whether such an unarmed riotous...

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