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Mr. Ames, from the committee appointed, presented, according to order, an address to the President of the United States, in answer to his speech to both Houses of Congress ; which was read, and ordered to be committed to a Committee of the whole House to-morrow.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary :

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have agreed to the resolution of this House, for the appointment of two Chaplains to Congress for the present session, and have elected the Right Reverend Bishop White, on their part. And then he withdrew.

The House then proceeded, by ballot, to the appointment of a Chaplain to Congress on the part of this House ; and, upon examining the ballots, a majority of the votes of the Whole House was found in favor of the Reverend Ashbel Green.

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.

Mr. Dwight Foster, from the Committee of Claims, made a report ; which was read and considered : Whereupon,

Resolved, That all claims which, during the last session of Congress, were referred to the Committee of Claims, and not by them reported on, be, and the same are hereby, referred to the Committee of Claims, for their consideration and report, pursuant to the rules of the House.

The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Treasurer of the United States, accompanying his accounts of the receipts and expenditures of public moneys, from the first of April to the thirtieth of September, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, inclusive ; also, of his payments and receipts on account of the War Department, froan the first of April to the thirtieth of September, one thousand seven hundred and ninetysix, inclusive ; which were read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Ordered, That the several reports of committees of the nineteenth of February, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three, the first of April, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four, and the fifteenth of February, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, on sundry petitions of refugees from Canada and Nova Scotia, be committed to a Committee of the Whole House on Thursday next.

A petition of James Craford, of the county of Washington, in the State of New York, a refugee from Nova Scotia, was presented to the House and read, praying compensa. tion for services rendered, and injuries sustained in his person and property, in adhering to the American cause, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Committee of the Whole House last appointed.

The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill to amend the act, entitled "An act for the more general pramulgation of the laws of the United States ;” and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said bill under consideration, and made no amendment thereto.

Ordered, That the said bill be engrossed, and read the third time to-morrow.

The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the report of the Committee of Claims, to whom was referred the petition of Henry Hill ; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said report under consideration, and made some progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said report.

The order of the day was further postponed until to-moitow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1796. An engrossed bill to amend the act, entitled “ An act for the more general promulgation of the laws of the United States," was read the third time.

Resolved, That the said bill do pass, and that the title be, “ An act to amend the act, entitled 'An act for the more general promulgation of the laws of the United States."

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do carry the said bill to the Senate, and desire their concurrence.

T'wo other members, to wit : from Virginia, Thomas Claiborne and John Page, appeared, and took their seats in the House.

The Speaker laid before the House a certificate and return from the Governor of North Carolina, of the election of William Strudwick, to serve as a member of this House, for the said State, in the room of Absalom Tatom, who has resigned his sent ; which was read: Whereupon,

The said William Strudwick appeared ; and the oath to support the Constitution of the United States being first administered to him, by Mr. Speaker, according to law, he took his seat in the House.

A petition of Constant Freeman, a refugee from Canada, by Ezekiel Freeman, his agent, was presented to the House and read, praying compensation for services rendered, and injuries sustained in his person and property, in adhering to the American cause, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Committee of the Whole House to whom are committed the reports of committees on the petitions of sundry refugees from Canada and Nova Scotia.

The petitions of Peter Lee, and of Cutlip Nestler, were presented to the House and read, respectively praying relief in consideration of wounds or other injuries received whilst in the actual service of the United States, during the late war.

Also, a petition of John Roff, of the county o Montgomery, in the State of New York, praying a re-consideration of his petition, presented the twenty-sixth of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three ; and that such relief may be granted him in the premises, as to the wisdom of Congress shall seem meet.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Committee of Claims.

Mr. William Smith, from the committee to whom were referred the petitions of Tho: mas Lloyd and of Thomas Carpenter, made a report ; which was read, and ordered to be committed to a Committee of the Whole House to-morrow.

Mr. Gilman, from the Committee of Revisal and Unfinished Business, to whom it was referred to report such laws of the United States as are near expiring, made a further report ; which was read, and ordered to lie on the table.

The order of the day for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the address to the President of the United States, in answer to his Speech to both Houses of Congress, being called for,

A motion was made, and the question being put, that the consideration of the said Address be postponed until to-morrow. It was resolved in the affirmative.

Ordered, That Philip Helphinstine, who presented a petition to this House, on the twenty-sixth of January last, have leave to withdraw the same.

Ordered, That so much of the report of the Committee of Claims, made the twentysecond of December, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, as relates to the pe- . tition of Benjamin Titcomb, be committed to a committee of the Whole House on Monday next. The several orders of the day were further postponed until to-morrow. And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1796. Two other members, to wit : from New Jersey, Thomas Henderson ; and from Pennsylvania, Thomas Hartley, appeared, and took their seats in the House.

A petition of Benjamin Thompson, of the State of Delaware, in behalf of himself and sundry other refugees from Canada, was presented to the House and read, praying con pensation for services rendered, and injuries sustained in their persons and property, in adhering to the American cause, during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Committee of the Whole House to whom are committed the reports of committees on the petitions of sundry refugees from Canada and Nova Scotia.

The several petitions of Dean Bangs, of Peter Sears, and of Nathan Winslow, of the State of Massachusetts, managing owners of the schooners Polly, Reliance, Sukey, and Two Brothers, were presented to the House and read, respectively praying that they may receive the bounty allowed by law to vessels employed in the codfisheries of the United States.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with itistruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.

A memoriał of Andrew Dunscomb, of the city of Richmond, in the State of Virginia, was presented to the House and read, praying a re-consideration of his petition, presented the fifth of January last ; and that such relief may be granted him in the premises, as to the wisdom of Congress shall seem meet.

Ordered, That the said memorial be referred to the Committee of Claims.

Mr. Freeman, one of the members for the State of Massachusetts, presented to the House a resolution of the Legislature of said State, ceding to the United States a tract

of land, called Gay’s Head, on the Island of Martha's Vineyard, for the purpose of erecting a light-house thereon ; which was read, and ordered to be referred to the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures.

The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, accompanying a plan for laying and collecting direct taxes, by apportionment among the several States, agreeably to the rule prescribed by the Constitution, in pursuance of a resolution of the

House, of the fourth of April last.
Ordered, That the said letter and plan do lie on the table.

On motion, Ordered, That the Comniittee of the Whole House, to whom was referred the report of the Committee of Claims, on the petition of Henry Hill, be discharged from the farther consideration of the same ; and that the said report be re-committed to the Conti mittee of Claims.

The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the report of the committee to whom were reterred the petition of Thomas Lloyd, and Thomas Carpenter ; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said report under consideration, and directed him to report to the House their disagreement to the same.

The House proceeded to consider the said report at the Clerk's table ; and the sazne being read, in the words following to wit :

“The committee to whom were referred the petitions of Thomas Lloyd and of Thomas Carpenter, report the following resolution, viz :

Resolved, That the Clerk of this House cause the Members to be furnished, during the present session, with copies of the debates of Congress, printed in this city, such as the Members, respectively, shall choose, to be delivered at their lodgings, provided they do not exceed the price at which subscribers, citizens of Philadelphia, are furnished with them;"

The question was taken, that the House do agree with the Committee of the Whole House in their disagreement to the said report,

And resolved in the affirmative.
The House, according to the order

of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Address to the President of the United States, in answer to his Speech to both Houses of Congress ; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said Address under consideration, and made some progress therein.

Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said Address.

The order of the day was further postponed until 10-morrow.
And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1796. The House, according to the order of the day, again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the Address to the President of the United States, in answer to his Speech to both Houses of Congress; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Muhlenberg reported that the committee had, accord ing to order, again had the said Address under consideration, and made several amendments thereto ; which he delivered in at the Clerk's table, where the same were severally twice read, and agreed to by the House.

The House proceeded to consider the said Address, at the Clerk's table, and the fol. lowing clause, in the fourth paragraph, being under consideration, to wit : “ And, while we participate in the full reliance you have expressed on the patriotism, selfrespect, and fortitude of our countrymen, we cherish the pleasing hope that a mutual spirit of justice and moderation will ensure the success of your perseverance;".

A motion was made and seconded to amend the said clause, by striking out the words while we participate in the full reliance you have expressed on the patriotism, self-respect, and fortitude of our countrymen ;" and to insert, in lieu thereof, after the word "perseverance," at the end of the clause, the words, “at the same time we assure ourselves that your just confidence in the patriotism, self-respect, and fortitude, of our citizens will not, in any event, be disappointed ; and that they will, on no occasion, forget what is due to the character and dignity of our Government and country.”

The previous question was called for by five members, to wit :
“ Shall the main question to agree to the said amendment, be now put ?"

S Yeas

And on the previous question, to wit: “Shall the said main question be now put it's

30, It passed in the negative,

Nays ..

49.
The yeas and nays being demanded by one-fifth of the members present,
Those who voted in the affirmative, are,
Fisher Ames,

Samuel Lyman,
Theophilus Bradbury,

Francis Malbone,
Joshua Coit,

John Reed,
William Craik,

Samuel Sewall,
James Davenport,

Samuel Sitgreaves,
George Ege,

Nathaniel Smith,
Abiel Foster,

Isaac Smith,
Dwight Foster,

William Smith,
Ezekiel Gilbert,

Zephaniah Swift,
Henry Glen,

George Thatcher,
Chauncey Goodrich,

Richard Thomas,
Roger Griswold,

Mark Thomson,
Robert Goodloe Harper,

John E. Van Allen,
Thomas Hartley,

Peleg Wadsworth, and
William Hindman,

John Williams.
Those who voted in the negative, are,
Theodorus Bailey,

Andrew Jackson,
Abraham Baldwin,

George Jackson,
David Bard,

Aaron Kitchell,
Thomas Blount,

Edward Livingston,
Nathan Bryan,

Matthew Locke,
Gabriel Christie,

William Lyman,
Thomas Claiborne,

Samuel Maclay,
John Clopton,

Nathaniel Macon,
Isaac Coles,

James Madison,
Henry Dearborn,

Andrew Moore,
George Dent,

Frederick A. Muhlenberg.
Jesse Franklin,

John Nicholas,
Nathaniel Freeman, junior,

John Page,
Albert Gallatin,

Josiah Parker,
William B. Giles,

John Patten,
James Gillespie,

John Richards,
Nicholas Gilman,

John S. Sherburne,
Christopher Greenup,

Israel Smith,
Andrew Gregg,

Richard Sprigg, Jun.
William B. Grove,

Williain Strudwick,
Carter B. Harrison,

John Swanwick,
Jonathan N. Havens,

Philip Van Cortlandt,
John Heath,

Joseph B. Varnum, and
Thomas Henderson,

Abraham Venable.
James Holland,
Another motion was then made and seconded, to amend the said Address, by striking
cut, in the last paragraph thereof, the following clause, to wit :

“For our country's sake, for the sake of republican liberty, it is our earnest wish that your example may be the guide of your successors ; and thus, after being the ornament and safeguard of the present age, become the patrimony of our de. scendants," And, on the question thereupon,

Yeas

24, It passed in the negative,

Nays

54.
The yeas and nays being demanded by one-fifth of the members present,
Those who voted in the affirmative, are,
Theodorus Bailey,

John Clopton,
David Bard,

Isaac Coles,
Thomas Blount,

Albert Gallatin,
Gabriel Christie,

William B. Giles
Voz. II.--78

Christopher Greenup,

Samuel Maclay,
John Heath,

Nathaniel Macon,
James Holland,

Andrew Moore,
Andrew Jackson,

Josiah Parker,
George Jackson,

John Patten,
Edward Livingston,

John Swanwick,
Matthew Locke,

Joseph B. Varnum, and
William Lyman,

Abraham Venable.
Those who voted in the negative, are,
Fisher Ames,

William Hindman,
Abraham Baldwin,

Aaron Kitchell,
'Theophilus Bradbury,

Samuel Lyman,
Nathan Bryan,

James Madison,
Thomas Claiborne,

Francis Malbone,
Joshua Coit,

F. A. Muhlenberg,
William Craik,

John Nicholas,
James Davenport,

John Page,
Henry Dearborn,

John Reed,
George Dent,

John Richards,
George Ege,

Samuel Sewall,
Abiel Foster,

John $. Sherburne,
Dwight Foster,

Samuel Sitgreaves,
Jesse Franklin,

Nathaniel Smith,
Nathaniel Freeman, Jurt.

Israel Smith,
Ezekiel Gilbert,

Isaac Smith,
James Gillespie,

William Smith,
Nicholas Gilman,

Richard Sprigg, Jun
Henry Glen,

William Strudwick,
Chauncey Goodrich,

Zephaniah Swift,
Andrew Gregg,

George Thacher,
Roger Griswold,

Richard Thomas,
William B. Grove,

Mark Thomson,
Robert Goodloe Harper,

John E. Van Allen,
Thomas Hartley,

Philip Van Cortlandt,
Jonathan N. Havens,

Peleg Wadsworth, and
Thomas Henderson,

John Williams. And then the main question being taken, that the House do agree to the said Address, amended to read as followeth :

Sur : The House of Representatives have attended to your communication respecting the State of our country, with all the sensibility that the contemplation of the subject and a sense of duty can inspire.

We are gratified by the information that measures calculated to ensure a continuance of the friendship of the Indians, and to maintain the tranquillity of the Western frontier, have been adopted ; and we indulge the hope that these, by impressing the Indian tribes with moie correct conceptions of the justice, as well as power of the l'uited States, will be attended with success.

While we notice with satisfaction, the steps that you have taken, in pursuance of the late treaties with several foreign nations, the liberation of our citizens who were prischers at Algiers, is a subject of peculiar felicitation. We shall cheerfully co-operate in any further measures that shall appear, on consideration, to be requisite.

We have everconcurred with you in the most sincere and uniform disposition to preserte our neutral relations inviolate, and it is, of course, with anxiety and deep regret we hear that any interruption of our harmony with the French Republic has occurred : For wc feel, with you and with our constituents, the cordial and unabated wish to maintain a perfectly friendly understanding with that nation. Your endeavors to fulfil that wish, and by all honorable means to preserve peace, and to restore that harmony and affec tion which have heretofore so happily subsisted between the French Republic and the United

States, cannot fail, therefore, to interest our attention. And while we participate in the full reliance you have expressed on the patriotism, self-respect,

and fortitude, of our countrymen, we cherish the pleasing hope that a mutual spirit of justice and moderation will ensure the success of your perseverance.

The var:ous subjects of your communication will respectively meet with the attention that is due to their importance.

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