American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine, Volume 4

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J.S. Skinner, 1833
 

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Página 396 - Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper ? the glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: he goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; neither turneth he back from the sword.
Página 395 - Hast thou given the horse strength? Hast thou clothed his neck with thunder? Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley and rejoiceth in his strength; He goeth on to meet the armed men.
Página 133 - No creature could be more grateful than my patient after his recovery; a sentiment which he most significantly expressed by licking my hand, first the back of it, then the palm, then every finger separately, then between all the fingers, as if anxious to leave no part of it unsaluted ; a ceremony which he never performed but once again upon a similar occasion.
Página 479 - Many trees two feet in diameter, I observed, were broken off at no great distance from the ground, and the branches of many of the largest and tallest had given way, as if the forest had been swept by a tornado. Everything proved to me that the number of birds resorting to this part of the forest must be immense beyond conception.
Página 591 - Trout is a fish highly valued, both in this and foreign nations: he may be justly said, as the old poet said of wine, and we English say of venison, to be a generous fish: a fish that is so like the buck that he also has his seasons; for it is observed, that he comes in and goes out of season with the stag and buck. Gesner says, his name is of a German...
Página 133 - Puss grew presently familiar, would leap into my lap, raise himself upon his hinder feet, and bite the hair from my temples. He would suffer me to take him up, and to carry him about in my arms, and has more than once fallen fast asleep upon my knee. He was ill three days, during...
Página 163 - By wintry famine roused, from all the tract Of horrid mountains which the shining Alps, And wavy Apennines, and Pyrenees, Branch out stupendous into distant lands ; Cruel as death, and hungry as the grave ! Burning for blood ! bony, and gaunt, and grim...
Página 478 - My first view of it was about a fortnight subsequent to the period when they had made choice of it, and I arrived there nearly two hours before sunset. Few pigeons were then to be seen, but a great number of persons, with horses and wagons, guns and ammunition, had already established encampments on the borders. Two farmers from the vicinity of...
Página 126 - THE HAUNCH OF VENISON A POETICAL EPISTLE TO LORD CLARE THANKS, my Lord, for your venison, for finer or fatter Never rang'd in a forest, or smok'd in a platter ; The haunch was a picture for painters to study, The fat was so white, and the lean was so ruddy.
Página 469 - But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still his master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone...

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