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I RODE homewards from Sir revoir, young gentleman," mattered Toby's. Sir Toby, was a man of the Captain as he went, and shook mettle; he felt as little inconveni. me by the hand, with a gria that ence from an ordinary debauch as set my teeth on edge. the lion from the exertion of his “ Henry," said my father withstrength in the chastisement of a out laying down his pen, “prepare mouse. Nature seemed to have en- for a voyage to France to-day.” dowed him with a vis inertiæ, dis _" To France, dear father, and on proportioned to his size (which, by what business?"_“I wish you to the way, was not of the smallest) to marry;"—" Marry!" I exclaimed enable him to resist the potent half aloud, for l'instantly beheld attacks of the jolly god. And, as myself in the mirror of my imagiif some extraordinary excitement nation, as a bridegroom decked with were necessary to his well-being, myrtle; at any side, an interesting, Sir Toby was never better, in every elegantly dressed young lady, bloomsense of the word, than when the ing with youth and beauty, and glitwine was wrestling with his reason, tering with jewels; who, consigned after the manner of the giants of to my heart, was destined for its inold against the gods, and often with habitant for the period of my life, as little success as was wont to at- and the days flew away likę boys at tend them.

chuck-farthing, disturbed by the We had contracted an acquaint- approach of a soldier or a parsonance at the coffee-house. He in my astonishment, however, was not vited me to Altona, where I had lessened. “Yes, a daughter of Mr. been sacrificing so heroically, in- Gerson, a merchant of Bourdeaux.” spired by the example of the stout " Wþat, father, a lady whom I Liearted Briton, that I just retained have never seen ?"-" Ti is a good my equipoise sufficiently to keep the house, and you will have the choice saddle, with scarcely sense enough of three sisters."-"But suppose I to find my way home without a should not like either of them ?"guide. It was a delightful cool "No foolery, Henry," said my father, May morning, and I greedily in- in a tone of earnestness; " there is haled the refreshing, breeze that a time for every thing, and I have blew directly iņ my face, so grate. allowed enough for that.”—“If [. ful to my heated lungs, while my were a prince." —“And though you pony trotted briskly along, antici. were an emperor, you would be but pating the luxury of a restorative a thoughtless boy, in need of a sleep till noon, and of dreams as guardian, and my son. Here is a glorious and endivening as the letter from Mr. Gerson, saying dawning day around me.

that lie expects you, and this is my There was a light in my father's

At twelve you will emcounting-house. This surprised me

“ You will surely allow me as it was only two o'clock. I en to take leave of a few of my friends ?" tered. My father was seated at his _“ It is not necessary. Here are desk; near him stood Captain Clas some cards; you have only to write sen, his old friend and servant, your name upon them.” They both stared to see me, and I took the cards and retired to winked to one another as I thought: my chamber. Marry! I muttered I wished them good morning, and to myself, and a little yellow, mea. was about to retire. * Good morn gre

French woman, whose whole buing, Henry,” said my father, “I am siness it is to disfigure, yet more glad you are here, for I have busi- by art, her sufficiently disgusting ness with you."-"Classen, we are person? And why not in Hamagreed then twelve p'clock pre-burgh, if it is to be at all? The cisely; I will have every thing in tall, fair Miss Sorgel, or the shorta readiness." Classen withdrew. " Ay round brunette, Miss Waterman, Eur. Mag. Aug., 1823.

0

answer.

bark."

or the rich one-eyed Miss Funk, or in the breeze, the sails outstretched the beautiful naive Miss Adler, or themselves to the gale, and Hamthe witty, fascinating - My, ideas burgh and the shores of our beloved became confused, and sleep bowed country by degrees darkened, receddown my head. I was just on the ed, and vanished from our view. point of changing my perpendicular It was not my first_voyage. I for a horizontal position rather too had formerly visited England on suddenly, when I luckily awoke, mercantile business ; consequently I and had sense enough to throw iny. felt no inconvenience from my situaself upon the bed, where, in the arms tion, except the ennui, which so of Morpheus, I soon forgot alike the sudden a transition from a life of beauties of Hamburgh and Bour- gaiety and dissipation to one of the deaux.

dullest uniformity could not fail to “ Henry!" sounded in my ears. engender. Captain Classen did his I sprang up, rubbed my drowsy utmost to banish this demon, and eye-lids, and stared; my father was earnest and indefatigable in imstood before me. “It is eleven ploring the aid of the soul-stirring o'clock ; your trunk is packed, the bowl to that effect. In fact, Sir wind is fair, and every minute you Toby and the rest of the jovial comdelay is lost. Haste then to take panions of iny nightly revels were some refreshment and embark.” I

mere milk-sops in comparison with looked sheepish and confounded. the old, wrinkled, ironheaded, copUpon a chair lay my travelling per-bottomed sea-captain. His cadress my father retired, and my pacious mouth resembled the bungservant, George, assisted me to un hole of a large moving wine logsdress and dress again. “Are you head, and I beheld with fearful as. to accompany me?" I asked. “ Yes, tonishment the bottles of French and Sir."-"I am glad of it,” said 1, Spanish wine emptying themselves and derived some little consolation by dozens into it, tilì, at length, from the circumstance; for there the power of participating in, as was not in existence a greater rogue, well as of witnessing, the prowess nor, at the same time, a more faith- of my valiant friend forsook me, ful fellow than this same George. and I was conveyed to my hammock, My father paid him for reporting where I soon slept so soundly that my extravagancies, (which he might the shock of an earthquake would do without hesitation, for I made have failed to rouse me. no secret of them myself) and I for I loved wine as a means of heightassisting me to cominit them. The ening the charms of an interesting prospect of the voyage hegan now conversation, and I had never, even to interest me; and if, for my sins, when carrying the use of it to exI was to be tied to a wife, like a cess, entirely lost sight of that obpoacher to a stag, it was at all ject. This last debauch, however, events more agreeable to choose her filled me, when I awoke, with the for myself from among three sisters sensation of having received a stunin France, than to have one allotted ning blow, accompanied by no ento me out of the magazine of mer- livening or redeeming recollections: chant's daughters here, warranted the satyr-like countenance of the sound and perfect, like any other Captain was still before my eyes, article of merchandize.

while in the back.ground of the I dined with a better appetite picture I beheld tlie rows of bottles than my parents and sister, and re that had exhausted their contents in ceived their good wishes, tears, and his fathomless throat. advice, on taking leave, with becom-. I was out of humour with myself, ing indifference.

and sted fastly refused Classen's inCaptain Classen was waiting with vitation to renew our libations. painful impatience. He did not take Finding me immoveable, he accomtime to welcome me, but the moment modated himself, at length, to my I stepped on board he gave the sig- taste, and entertained me with a nal, and, amidst the tumultuous description of Bourdeaux, and with bawling of the sailors, the masts accounts of Mr. Gerson and his sprung up, the pendants fluttered danghters. This conversation wea

ried me, I forced myself to hear a throw with my good friend, Clasnothing, and after a while retired, sen, whom I took to be a warm peevish and fretful, to my cabin. fellow, but the devil trust the old My trunk struck me. I had not yet sinner! I dreaded finding my man opened it, and resolved to do it now, as formidable here as at the bottle, rather for the sake of amusement and anticipated, therefore, but a than from curiosity. My best clothes, miserable passe-tems dearly bought. my finest linen, letters to several A better spirit turned my thoughts mercantile houses, a casket contain on Paris. I had seen London, and ing a valuable ring with bracelets should I overlook her proudest to match. I guessed its destination, rival? George was called, and we and pushed it aside, when lo! what concerted measures together. should peep out of one corner of the “ Shall we soon come to an antrunk but a crimson purse! I took clor, Captain ?" I enquired, as the it up, and my heart danced with de coast of France appeared in sight. light as I weighed it in my band. " Where ?" he wondering asked: On opening it, the contents proved “ At Boulogne.” – “Why should to be exactly three hundred Louis we?"_“What, don't you know, my d'ors.

good fellow? Has my father said I had frequently lost as much, and nothing to you ?"_" Not a word." more than this in a single night; and, -"Not that I am to land here, and in fact, only the other evening; I travel by way of Paris to Bour, had inconsiderately wagered double deaux ?"-" Potz tausend! ar't not the sum with Sir Toby, that I would sober yet?" and he burst into a not stir afoot out of Hamburgh the horse laugh. “I hope, Classen,” following day, which was the day. 1 rejoined in a tone of displeasure, we set sail, But latterly, owing, you

do not take me for a fool ? no doubt, to the fault of the circular George, were not such my father's form of the gold pieces, there was orders ?" George hesitated ; a sig. never a Louis in my pocket in the nificant look from me, which Clasmorning that did not, before night, sen could not observe because he roll into that of another person. was staring full at the fellow, came The ebb was naturally stronger like a reinforcement to his zeal, and than the flow; and, in spite of the he corroborated my statement. liberal allowance my father granted "Aye, aye?-Humph!" muttered me, I was certain of meeting a cre Classen, regarding me with an enditor in every one of the numerous quiring look, which, however, I streets of Hamburgh; they were

braved with unaltered countenance; always, however, exceedingly civil, “ that I did not know. I ask your and 'satisfied with the honour of pardon.” being told, in answer to their en He steered for Boulogne. In a quiries, that I was well.

few hours George and I with our It

gave me, at this moment, in- luggage were on shore, and shortly describable pleasure to picture to afterwards on the road to Paris. myself the rage and vexation of this I exulted aloud as I beheld the spire unlucky horde of brokers, Jews, of Notre Dame, and soon after the wine-merchants, and tavern-keepers, whole sea of houses which surroundon hearing of my departure ; and I ed it. Now, in sight of one of the would gladly have given a third of first cities in the world, it occurred to my prize to any “wise man of the me to consider what I wanted there. east," who would shew them, in bis Pleasure! What else? or how best magical mirror, my present figure, enjoy it? While I was thus occusitting here in security, counting pied' for plans for making the most my Louis d'ors.

of my liberty, and my three hundred But I had too little of the miser Louis, we arrived at our destinain my composition to find satisfac- tion. 'I immediately hired a chamtion long in this amusement; on the bre garnie, assumed the title of contray, with an impatience more Lord Johnsbury, and appropriated consistent with the very opposite the first fortnight to visiting all the character, I began to lay schemes places of amusement, and seeing all for spending my money. An evil the sights the capital afforded. My spirit tempted me to try my luck at British name, and more, my British

gold, made every thing easy fő té, tronly lady in a very tender, and and all were obsequiods to serve me. by her lovely companion in a no

I did not scruple to wear the soli- less friendly manner. Now, thought taire intended for my bride. The I, is the time to push my fortane ; diamond had hecome loose, and I assailed the young lady, who I entered a jeweller's shop to get it seemed to be almost given up to me repaired. Two ladies came in al- by her protectress, with all the idle most immediately afterwards. One Battery and nonsense I could muster of them was elderly; the other and was so importunate, in short, in young and beautiful ; so beautiful, the arowal of my passion, and so indeed, that for the first time in urgent in imploring her compassion my life I was seized with a kind of on my sufferings, that the sunshine bashful admiration, as I beheld her, of her enchanting countenance by and I made way for her with the degrees entirely vanished, and the profoundest respect.

clouds of ber displeasure gathered She bargained for a pair of ear so thickly over her features, that I rings; the jeweller asked her too was really hurt, and felt myself at much, and she very reluctantly re- last compelled to enquire what was turned them. I instantly paid down the matter. Nothing, Sir," she the money and requested her ac. replied, with such a look of unceptance of them, in remenibrance daunted virtue as disconcerted me of the sentiments of respect and not a little; " except, that we have admiration with which she had in both been mistaken.” This rebuff spired a stranger. “You are very completed my discomfiture; I kept generous, Sir, and the jewels are silence for a long while before I extremely pretty; but even if they could collect máy scattered resolution were far handsomer, the very cir- for an attack upon the old lady. cüinstance of your being a stranger She was more reserved than I exto-me puts it out of my power to pected to find her; and indulged me accept of them.” She blushed as with a long lecture, such as I could she spoke, and fixed her beaming have supposed a duenna alone capaeyes upon me with such a mild, yet ble of delivering, on the 'Want of penetrating look, that I trembled self-government in the men, and the with a mixed sensation of fear and propriety of prudence and reserve pleasure. I entreated, but in rain. in the female sex, before she would A little impatient at her refusal I condescend to inform me that she turned at length to her companion, sometimes walked in the Thuilleries offered her the ear-rings, and begged with her niece, when the weather her to allow Ne, at least, the satis was favourable. faction of obliging the fair inexo: : I had forgotten to enquire at what rable in her friend. Her eyes glis. hour, and had interpreted the word tened as she contemplated my gift, sometimes according to my wishes. and a little persuasion induced her The fashionable world was still buto accept it. The young lady's tied in sleep, when my anxious steps countenance evinced her disappro- led me, reveur, to the Thuilleries. bation of her companion's conduct, Somewhat less to the inconvenience and she shook her head as she saw of my purse than my stomach, I conher take them. They departed, and tinued by fruitless prometade till I was silly enough to suffer them to nightfall. This course I pursued do so without asking a single quest for four days, yet neither aunt nor tion.

niece were visible, and I was ready Arrived at my lodgings I awoke to die with rage and vexation. The as it were from a dream; the figure sun was decliding on the fifth day, of the lovely girl was still before and I was heartily cursing myself my eyes, and I would willingly and all the women in and out of have given thirty more Louis to see Paris, when I cauglit sight of niy the original once again. Fortune dulcinea and her duenna. She favoured my wishes; in the Theatre shuddered as her glance met minė; Français I espied my two ladies in I know not whether at myself, or at a box. Hastening to pay my re the violent émotions which must spects to them, I had the satisfac- have been strikingly pourtrayed in tion of being received by the ma my couutenance. These emotions

were entirely without my power to uneasiness; however, I could play controul, and I attacked her with no more, and I returned home such earnestness in entreaties, ex “ George," said I, as he undressed postulations and assurances, that me, handing him the purse: “ fill it her prudent reserve and indifference again tomorrow." What! have gradually softened into compassion you got a fresh supply?"_" How! and sympathy. I took advantage the money I gave you."—"Is melted of this favourable change to offer down to twenty Louis, of which onr. her the ring, which I again wore, landlord claims three.” “ Scounand it was firmly fixed on her finger drel, you have robbed me!" before she had time properly to con “ Would you like to inspect my sider the objections to her accept- account, Sír.”_" Well, well; think ing it.

of some resource,"_" For travel* You make a child of me," said ting, Sir?" No!" I exclaimed, she, after a vain resistance; “ I am with warmth ; “I will not leave as culpable in listening to you, as in Paris now if I sleep upon the stones ; accepting this diamond; but you does any thing strike you?”—“Noare conferring an obligation on an thing. I was at the Thuilleries toangrateful one, and who ought not day, and your diamond ring gliteven to suffer you to suspect that tered through the hedge that sepashe is so against her will."

I com

rated us like a sunbeam-but God plained in yain of this cruelty. No- help us, you have lost it.”_" Away! thing further could I elicit from you are a lurking knave; the girt her; yet she did not deprive me of is an angel!"_" From the Palais all hope, and in a favourable mo Royal !The fellow uttered these frent I secretly begged the aunt to words with such a malicious griv gtant me her assistance, and to ac that I stared at him, thunderstruck. quaint më with her residence. “[ " I hope,” said I -" That I jest: am under a promise to my niece, God forbid! She is the niece of a Sir," she replied, “to give you no tespectable, pious lady, and they assistance whatever, therefore it is are both excellent connaisseuses of out of my power to grant your re jewels ; d-propos, there is a pair of quest. I must confess, however," she bracelets to inatch the ring." added, smiling, “ that I am a little “ Peace!" I exclaimed, with an surprised at your asking such a

angry frown. question.". I was confounded at my The prospect of being reduced to owo simplicity; I suffered them to the bitterest distress in a town, in depart without uneasiness, and or which I was an atter stranger, dering my valet de place to follow added to the probability of my sathem at a distance, soon learnt that crificing myself to a contemptible they resided in the neighbourhood fille, was not the most agreeable. of the Palais Royal.

Her portrait, deeply engraven on I was still too timid to avail my my heart in the noblest traits, gave self of the advautage I thus gained the lie to these suspicions; and yet, that day. The turbulency of my when I considered all the circumfeelings drove me from one place stances, and particularly the behato another; even in the theatre I viour of the aunt, I could not ensought in vain for abstraction. The tirely banish tlrem from my mind. highly impassioned Talma appeared Unable to come to any decision, and now frigid and dull; the natural harrassed by the contending pasand affecting performance of Made- sions which raged in my breast, I moiselle George, but empty, heart was pacing the room with hasty less affectation. Unable to hold strides, when Mons. Brelon, my out longer I hurried to the Patais landlord, entered. Royal, that I might at least enjoy Pardonnez Monseigneur," said the satisfaction of being near her. M. Brelon, a genuine Parisian ;

Chance led me to a garning-house. “ pardon my intrusion at this unIt was just the thing; I punted, won, seasonable hour; but I have too lost, won again, lost again, and in great a respect for milord to keep two hoars time found myself with- from your knowledge some important out a sous. The forty Louis d'ors intelligence that I have received."which had emigrated gave me little “ I am most highly indebted to your

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