Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

An account, sewing the produce of one quarter of wheat, barley, oats, and rye, respectively,

dressed through a thirteen Milling cloth, and of the denomination of standard, or the
whole of the flour of the grain, from which the loaves, presented to a committee of
the honourable House of Commons on the 9th instant, were manufactured as Specified
in the accompanying schedule.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

*fn account, f]ietving the produce of one quarter of wheat, barley, oats, and rye, respectively, dretfed through a tuentv-one stilling cloth, and of the denomination of household flour, from ichich the loaves, presented to a committee of the honourable House of Commons on > the 9thivjtant, zeerc manufactured, as specified in the accompanying schedule.

[table]

N. B. The several species of grain in these tables were British, and of the growth of the present year; and
cost, on ihe z''th of October, 1795, viz—Wheat, 96s. per quarter—oats 29s. 6d.—barley", 38s.—rye, 5CS. £d. At
■which time the middlings from wheat were worth 99s. per quarter of 10 bushels of 561b each ;and the bran from
ditto, 10s. p< r quarter ot 1 bushels of 16 Ib each. But the value of the middlings and bran produce i from the
other species of grain, the Victualling Hoard are not ot themselves competent to speak to.' .

Victualling Office, Nov. 11, 1795.

[ocr errors]

Victualling Office, Ztli Dec. 1795.
■An account, skewing the produce of one quarter of wheat, barley, oats, rye, and Indian cornx
respectively, dressed through a tzventy-one shilling cloth ;prepared in pursuance ofa letter
from the Honourable Dudley Ryder, chairman of the corn committee of the Honourable ^
House of Commons, dated the 28th November lajh W

. ^

r

[table]

A'. Æ. The several species of grain (excepting the Indian corn) above-mentioned were British, and of the growth of the present year ;and cost, on the 26th October 1795, v'z —Wheat, 99s. per quarter—oats, 29s. 6d.— barley, 3.8s. -rye, 50s. 6d..—Indian corn, 46s. At which time the middling^ from wheat were worth 96s. per quarter of 10 bushels of 561b.—and the bran from ditto, 10s. per quarter of 16 bulhels of 16lb. But the value of the middlings and bran produced from the other species of grain, the Victualling Board are not of themselves competent to speak to.

[ocr errors]

An account, thewing the produce of' 7 lb. (the stipulated quantity for two quartern loares )

of fundry mixtures of grain, &c. directed to be baked into bread ;---mhewing the weight of
dough made therefrom, the quantity required for making two quartern loaves, according io
the custom of the town bakers, being 9 lb. 10 oz. or 4. lb. 13 oz. each ;-the weight it turned
out over or short thereof;--and the weight of the bread when taken out of the oven :-pre-
pared in pursuance of a letter from the chairman of the corn committee, 28th Nov. last.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Copy of a Letter from Charles Dundas, frjq. to the Chairman of the Committee appointed to enquire into the &>igb Price of Corn.

Sir,

AS many of the members, who have attended the committee appointed to inquire into the high price of corn, may visit their constituents during the Christmas recels, I beg leave to call their attention to a subject which I conceive does most materially affect the sale of wheat, and to propose a remedy for some part of the. grievances whiqh are now complained of, meaning that our constituents rnay be consulted, during the adjournment of parliament, on the practicability of adopting weight as a regulator of measure, which appears to me to be the only just criterion of the quality of corn.

By this, jobbing would'be annihilated, and certainty would be established in the returns of your markets, and in the profits of the miller, mealman, and baker. At this instant, notwithstanding the prevailing opinion, that the Winchester bushel is the legal standard, yet there does not exist a certain measure in the kingdom. The bushel kept in the Exchequer is less than eight of the standard gallons there, the gallon less than lour standard quarts, and the quart is more than two standard pints. The bushel of queen Elizabeth, 1591, contains 2,124 cubical indicts; the gallon of the fame date, 271 cubical inches, and the pint, dated 1002, 34T\ cubical inches: Therefore the inequalities of. your

regulating standard measures are as>

tollow.

Cubical inch*

13 Win. III. c. 5. Round i8£

inches. Diameter 8 inches 2,150 The standard bulhel in the

Exchequer 2,124

Eight of the standard gallons a/168 Thirty-two of the standard • quarts 2,240

Sixty-four of the standard pints 2,227

But this inequality of your standard measures is not the grievance of which I particularly complain; it is the uncertain practice of selling corn in the country markets by measures of various sizes, which is an evident fraud on the consumers of bread, and an advantage to none but the jobbers in corn, who, from practice, are as well acquainted with the size of every farmers bustiel as with" his face. As the measure varies almost every ten miles, the difference is a great encouragement to corn dealers, and the public are deceived by seeing in the Gazette the account of the prices of grain in different counties, which cannot be accurately collected, whilst the measures so locally differ.

In markets where certainty of measures is not strictly attended to, all averages must be false. In many, where the nine gallon measure is customary, I have known measures of ten gallons, and, what is a shameful fraud on the consunier gentlemen's bulhels of ten gallons and a half.—The dealer;, knowing this, give an advanced price for the largest measures, consequently when the average of the market is struck, and a return

« ZurückWeiter »