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tone, while allowing the mental condition to remain the same.

The cause which produces the defect in the tone must be removed.

It might be possible, if the pupil were a good imitative actor, to teach him to speak in tones from which the evidences of the moral weakness had been eliminated, and he might be able to do this with sufficient adroitness to deceive many, with reference to that one weakness, but he would add to his voice the harmonics of insincerity or artificiality, and while the mask of the sheep might hide the wolf, it could not hide the fact that he was masked.

EXAMPLES. The method of eradicating moral weakness consists in assiduously cultivating the opposite quality. If the weakness be a lack of sincerity, the pupil is required to practise being sincere so many times per day, and with repetitions so frequent that it becomes a habit. During this period of practice he must be absolutely truthful under all circumstances. If the weakness be that of an indefinite, indecisive, indistinct articulation, consisting of broken sentences with halting intervals between, -if the words be spoken with an uncertainty, without any orotund quality, and as if the speaker were afraid someone would hear them, a defect indicative of lack of mental coherence and definite convictions, — his culture must be directed towards the formation of convictions regarding truths of the nature and relation of simple phenomena, and the study must be systematically continued until there has been built up in his mind a logical system of related facts and principles, of the truth of which he is personally certain ; and he must be required to teach these until all evidence of his former weaknesses has been eliminated from his speech. Indecision in the articulation of words - the absence of the vocal elements of speech, and the undue emphasis of the consonants -- is a widely prevalent error of greater importance than a mere matter of poor elocution, and one which no elocutionary drill can remove.

When a man knows whereof he speaks, when he is filled with intense and burning convictions regarding a matter, when every part of his subject is familiar to him, and when all parts of it are systematically arranged in his mind, he speaks as if every word were a coin freshly struck from the mint,and sentences follow each other as regularly as if written out beforehand. Indistinct words are born of indistinct ideas; broken and balting sentences are born of a lack of mental continuity; the absence of full tones and carefully enunciated words comes from a lack of appreciation of the importance of the subject, or from a failure to understand it; and hesitation between parts of sentences, and the habit of leaving them unfinished, indicates the speaker's own mental uncertainity.

It is evident this cannot be removed by a drill upon certain sentences, or set pieces : its removal requires the re-training, and re-formation of every mental habit, and the education of the mind and soul in a most general way. He must form the habit of talking frequently and positively about things which he thoroughly understands and believes. The eradication of these defects accomplishes more than the improvement of his speech - it makes a careful, prudent and wise man of one who, hitherto, had been weak and injudicious.

The object may be the removal of harsh, unattractive, and repellant tones and discords from a voice otherwise perfect.

The removal of these tones means the replacing of an ungenerous, cruel dispostion, by a kind, all-loving, sympathetic nature.

Whatever there may be in music, poetry, or art, capable of exciting sentiments of pity or tenderness, should be resorted to many times daily, the object being to produce such a frequent recurrence of the feelings of tenderness and loving kindness, that there shall be no opportunity for feelings of the reverse kind.

The practical circumstances and events of life must be daily used for furnishing actual tests of these feelings.

Suffering people and animals must be ministered to in the most tender manner, until the kindly part of the pupil's nature so completely dominates, that no room can be found for opposite emotions.

G. N. K. R. RULE OF WARFARE AGAINST THE EVILS. An important rule of practice is to prevent the formation of an ungenerous feeling or thought, by stopping it at its very inception by thoughts of an opposite character, initiated and maintained by force of will, until every vestige of the former emotion has perished. If you find rising in your heart a sentiment of hate towards

any

creature in the universe, immediately destroy it by forcibly forming in your mind and heart sentiments of love and sympathy for that self-same creature, and continue it until you can never again feel anything but love for that object.

The above rule applies to all the evils and passions. We cannot learn correct speech by being taught that certain words and phrases are ungrammatical : we must practise correct words and phrases until we form a habit of using them. In the same way, we can never eradicate the evil emotions by being taught that they are wrong : we must practise the proper emotions, thoughts and feelings until they become habitual, — until it would be as unnatural for us to entertain an emotion of hate or revenge, as it would be to use some very awkward form of speech.

In accomplishing this frequent repetition of the desirable emotions and feelings, we can call to our aid nothing so serviceable as tones.

Music, Melody, and Harmony and their handmaid, Song, should be brought into daily requisition ; but it is to simple tones, accompanied by their variable harmonics, that we must look for our greatest aid. This will require, in the Halls of Practice, instruments for the production at will of harmonics and their relative variations.

At any time of day, when needed, these tones can produce in an intensified form, whatever emotions may be desired, accompanied by their appropriate physical and mental conditions.

These exercises gradually produce an ascendency of the desirable over the undesirable emotions, and, from lack of use and repetition, the entire disappearance of the undesirable; and, in course of time, the bodily structures and modifications through which the evil emotions found expression, will also disappear; the voice will be free from the tones indicative of these evils, will have taken on the structures belonging to the desirable emotions, and will give them expression in the tones of the voice, habits of speech, feature and gesture.

THE PRACTICE OF THE PROPER 37 TONES. While this course of culture is being carried on, important aid is deriva ble from continuous practice in the use of those voice-tones expressive of

the emotions which are intended to be cultivated. To continually speak in tones of gentleness, as an artificial practice, will gradually develop the corresponding sentiments.

This is true in other departments of culture. It is difficult to act silly while the body is maintained in the attitude and pose of dignity. It is almost impossible to deal in dishonorable trivialities while the shoulders are erect and the bearing magnanimous. While sitting in a kingly attitude and maintaining an air of supremacy, it is quite difficult to talk of trivial subjects. A friend refused to mimic a lunatic long at a time, because it made him feel crazy. In fact, to maintain an attitude, gesture, or bearing, typical of some attribute of the mind or heart, will, in a short time, produce that attribute.

The same is true of vocal tones.

By constant repetition and reiteration of those tone qualities typical of certain emotional and mental characteristics, there is gradually produced a growth of these qualities. The pupil should not be allowed to repeat these tones during his development, unless the harmonics of his voice have been carefully measured, and unless, during practice, he can hear the proper tones when artificially produced. In this respect the practice of no two pupils can be alike.

Each devotee must pass alone through the Halls of Learning.

A single tone of a few seconds' duration will be sufficient to produce the emotional state desired, and this state is maintained by a rhythmical, vocal intonation of the same tone, after the manner of a chant or mantra, and the appropriate mental state is superadded by the sounding of a tone whose seventh harmonic is augmented.

It is, of course, highly important that these tones, which serve as standards, shall be absolutely accurate, and perfectly typical of the moral state to be developed.

It requires the use of an instrument capable of producing every pitch of sound, and of giving at will, simultaneously with the simple notes, every harmonic of those pitches, and also every possible variation of relative loudness of the harmonics to the simple tones, as well as of the harmonics relative to themselves; and this instrument is sacred to the use of those prepared to profit by it. It is an observable fact that the repetition of a sad tone will lower the pulse and depress every vital function, and that cheerful tones have an effect precisely opposite.

It is said that Henry Clay could pronounce the words, “The days that are past and gone,” in a manner so effective and mournfully pathetic as to bring tears to the eyes of his audience. The story of Chiron, of Pan, of the Siren, and of the flute-players who could charm the birds, are but mementos of the universal belief in the power of music and tone.

If as an unstudied art, and while ignorant of its underlying philosophy, we are able to cast over the body and mind, by means of an æolian or vocal tone, an enchantment more wonderful than can be worked by poems, melodies or orations, what magic power may we not expect from those who have grown familiar with the science of harmonics, and have become skilled in the application of tones for specific purposes ?

POPULAR MISUNDERSTANDINGS. There are those who will at once cry out, “ black-art, wizardry and magic!” and who will endeavor to cast upon a noble and divine science the odium of persistent popular prejudice and ignorance.

The tremulous dame will immediately dream of innumerable instances of the misuse of such a power. Lurking in the inner recesses of the minds of ignorant persons is an active consciousness that, if they were in possession of such a power, they would use it for selfish ends and personal laudation. It is a trite saying that forces for good are capable of being used for evil.

Having in mind a man whose voice is tremulous with virile power, who by long culture has obtained complete mastery over the harmonics and intonations of his voice, they imagine him going about casting emotional spells upon those whom he wishes to use for ignoble purposes.

They conceive the voice of love and sympathy as eloquent in persuading an unsuspecting victim to do something self-destructive. We are most happy to say authoritatively — upon the authority of all that is that the misuse of these wonderful powers is simply impossible.

No one capable of misusing the power can ever obtain the mastery of it.

As long as there remains in the heart the possibility of using a knowledge of these forces for selfish ends, so long that knowledge can by no possibility be obtained.

This iš A STARTLING ASSERTION! It is commonly believed that nearly all that is of value in human knowledge is taught in the schools, or has been printed in books.

That there is a sacred knowledge, obtainable only by those who lead sinless lives, is an idea that has been scouted. Is there in reality a knowledge and a power unattainable even by the most intellectual person, so long as there remains in his heart the slightest traces of anger, hate, or resentment?

Studies of Oriental literature give us no light upon this subject; and we know of no instance in any language where any proof, or rational explanation, is given of this fact. The G. N. K. R claim to be in possession of a vast collection of knowledges, and of numerous arts and forces hitherto unknown to any of the societies, schools, or peoples of the world. They claim that these knowledges cannot be indiscriminately taught to the public, and that they have a rational, as well as divine sanction for keeping their knowledges and secrets most carefully guarded. They offer to deserying, initial religious movements whatever material or scientific aid they need in order that there may be in such movement a nucleus through which worthy people may gain access to these knowledges, as fast as they are prepared to receive them; and they unhesitatingly affirm that no persons can acquire the powers belonging to these knowledges while any of the evils are operative in their hearts. It is claimed that every vestige of selfishness must be eradicated from the heart before the studies for these attainments can be commenced. They state that in some instances these knowledges, if taught to the unprepared, would place dangerous implements in the hands of the untrustworthy and unskillful. That, while it might be possible to teach in a didactic way, the principles and items of knowledge belonging to a certain force, or to a certain human power, yet, until the pupil could acquire a natural skill therein, by virtue of his own natural capaci. ties and development, this knowledge could be of no advantage to him, but would, in the majority of instances, be positively dangerous. If it can be shown in some one of the domains of scientific investigation, that there is an order of attainment and skill far superior to a mere knowledge of the principles thereof, and if it can also be shown that, at least in this particular do

main, there is an order of attainment and skill absolutely unapproachable by those who are capable of anger and selfishness, then we will have laid for the first time a completely rational and scientific foundation for a great ethical and moral superstructure, and for a demonstration of the great moral law which forms the basis of the secret work of the G. N. K. R.

(To BE CONTINUED.)

NAKED EYE ASTRONOMY.

BY CHAS. H. MACKAY.

Number Five. The beautiful group of stars known as the constellation of Scorpio may be easily found at this date. About the middle of June * Scorpio occupies a position directly, south at 10 P. m., and may readily be located by the brilliant red star, Antares, which indicates the Scorpion's heart.

Sagittarius was nearly in full view at the above mentioned time, and just now may be easily recognized from having the planet Jupiter within its boundaries. Jupiter will be noticed shining with a most brilliant, steady light, unlike the brilliancy of Antares however, the latter sparkling and flashing, from the fact that he shines from light of his own creation, while the planet's light is reflected from the Sun.

The other constellations now in veiw are Virgo, in the south-west, of which Spica is the principal member ; Libra half-way between Virgo and Scorpio; Bootes slightly to the west of the Zenith-point, with Arcturus as its principal star; Leo, well toward the west, Regulus being its brighest member; Corona Borealis, or Northern Crown, directly overhead ; Hercules a little farther east, and Lyra slightly toward the north-east, the latter having Vega, a brilliant white star, as its brightest member.

NOTES.

There are comparatively few people who know that the Moon always presents the same hemisphere Earthward. Such, however, is the case. No human being has ever been privileged to look upon both hemispheres. The reason for this is found in the fact that she revolves on her axis in exactly the same time that she performs her monthly journey around the Earth, namely about 27 and 1-3 days.

朱 *

The true surface of Venus has probably never been seen. That which we behold is the atmosphere by which she is surrounded. The light and heat received by her is far in excess of that received by Earth. As to her habitability it is not unreasonable to suppose that beings somewhat resembling man may find there the environments necessary for their existence.

A great tax may not be imposed upon the imagination if we assume that both Mars and Venus support beings very much like ourselves. Perhaps, of all the planets of the Solar System, Mars is the most like the Earth in many important features, and is most likely to be inhabited by beings resembling the human race as it is known to us. While the surface of Venus

* This article was written for July Esoteric, but was crowded out from press of other matter. The position of Scorpio, as well as of the other constellations mentioned above, are some degrees farther West at this date (July 20).

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