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Poor Knights of Windsor,
Pages of the Royal Family.

Pages' of the King.

Pages of her late MAJESTY,
Gentlemen Ushers Quarterly Waiters to his MAJESTY.
Gentlemen Ushers Quarterly Waiters to her late MAJESTY.

Pages of Honour to his MAJESTY,
Pages of Honour to her late MAJESTY.
Apothecaries to the Prince REGENT,

Apothecaries to the King.
Apothecaries to her late MAJESTY.
Surgeons to the Prince REGENT.

Surgeons to the King,
Surgeons to her late MAJESTY.
The Curate and Rector of Kew.

The Curate and Rector of Windsor.
Grooms of the Privy Chamber to his MAJESTY,
Grooms of the Privy Chamber to her late MAJESTY.
Gentlemen Ushers, Daily Waiters to his MAJESTY,
Gentlemen Ushers, Daily Waiters to her late MAJESTY.

Serjeant Surgeons to the King.
Physicians to the Prince REGENT-Sir W. FARQUHAR, SIR G, Blane,

Sir W, KNIGHTON, Sir M. J. TIERNEY.
Physicians to the King-Sir L. Pepys, and W. HEBERDEN.
Physicians to her late MAJESTY—Sir F. Millman, and Sir H. Halford.
Clerk of the Closet to the Prince Regent, Rev. George FREDERICK BLOMBERG.
Household Chaplain (at Windsor) to his MAJESTY, Rev. Isaac Gosser.

Equerries to the Royal Family.
Military Secretary to the COMMANDER IN CHIEF, Maj.-Gen. Sir H. TORRENS, G.C.B.

Equerries to the PRINCE REGENT.
Clerk Marshal and First Equerry to the Prince REGENT,
Quarter Master General,

Adjutant General,
Major-Gen. Sir J. W. Gordon. Lieut-Gen, Sir H. CALVERT.

Equerries to the King.
Clerk Marshal and First Equerry to the King, Lieut.-Gen. F. T. HAMMOND.
Equerries to her late MAJESTY-Hon. Sir E. STOPFORD, Hon. A. UPTON,

and Hon. C. Murp.AY. Gentlemen Ushers of the Privy Chamber to liis MAJESTY-John IIALE,

R. CHESTER, W. C. MASTER, and G. T. HATTON, Esqrs. Gentlemen Usbers of the Privy Chamber to her late MAJESTY-T, FAUQUIER, C. Rocke, Esqrs, and Major-General Sir T. B. PECHELL, Bart.

Officers of the Duchy of ('orowall.
Chamberlain to the Great Steward of Scotland, Viscount KEITA, G.C.B.
Grooms of the Bed Chamber to his MAJESTY-General Finch, Colonel Thomas,
General STEVENS, Colonel STANHOPE, General Sir J. CRADOCK,

General Sir W. KEPPEL, Bon, F. Greville, Sir
A. K. LEGGE, Sir II. BURRARD
NEALE, General Sir H.

CAMPBELL,
Solicitor General,

Attorney General,
Sir R. GIFFORD.

Sir SAMUEL SHEPHERD.
Her late MAJESTY's Solicitor General, Her late Majesty's Attorney General,
ANTHONY HART, Esq.

J. VAUGHAN, Esq.

Comptroller of his MĄJESTY's Household, Treasurer of his MAJESTY's Household, Lord Geo, TAO. BERESFORD.

Lord C. BEXTINCK,

HERALDS.
Privy Purse and Private Secretary to the Prince REGENT,

Sir BENJAMIN BLOOMFIELD.
Lord Chief Baron-Right Hon. Sir R. Richards.
Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas-Sir ROBERT Dallas,

Vice Chancellor-Sir Jorn LEACH,

Master of the Rolls-Sir Thomas PLUMER.
Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench-Sir CHARLES A BBOTT.
Lords of the Bed Chamber to the PrincE REGENT-Lord Boston,
Earl POULETT, Lord CeARLES SPENCER, Marquis of
HEADFORT, Viscount MELBURNE, Lord JAMES
MURRAY, Vis. PeTERSHAN, Vis. LAKE,
Earl De Lawar, Lord GRAVES,

Lord AMHERST.
Master of the Household to

Vice Chamberlain to bis

Groom of the Stole to his MAJESTY, and Secretary

MAJESTY (on the Windsor

his MAJESTY (on the to the Groom of the Stole (on

Windsor Establishment)

Establishment), the Windsor Establishment),

Lord Earl of WINCAILS EA. ‘B. C. STEPA ENSON, Esq.

Joan TAYNXE. Bishop of EXETER, Clerk of the Closet to the KING,

Bishop of London,

Bishop of SALISBURY,

Chancellor of the Order of

Right Hon.
Honourable

the Garter,

WILLIAM HOWLEY.
GEORGE PELAAM,

J. Fisher, D.D.
HERALDS.
Minister of State of Hanover-Count Munster.

Deputy Earl Marshal-Lord H. HOWARD, M, HOWARD.
His MAJESTY's Ministers-Earl of WestMORLAND, Earl of HARROWBY, Viscount
SIDmouth, Earl BATHURST, K.G. Right Hon. NICHOLAS VANSITTART,
Viscount MELVILLE, Earl of MCLGRAVE, Right Hon. GEORGE

CANNING, Right Hon. C. BATHURST, Right Hon.
WILLIAM W. POLE, Right Honourable

FREDERICK JOHN ROBINSON.
Archbishop of YORK --Pight Honourable EDWARD V ENABLES Verron, D.C.L.

Lord Chancellor-Lord Elpon.
Archbishop of CANTERBURY — Right Hon. CHARLES MANNERS SUTTON, D.D.

NORROY King of Arms.
Captain of the

Captain of the Band
Yeomen of the Guard,

of Gentlemen Pensioners,
Earl of MACCLESFIELD,

Earl of COURTOWN.
Master of the Horse

Groom of the Stole
to his MAJESTY,

to his MAJESTY, Duke of MONTROSE, K, G.

Marquis of WINCHESTER.

The CROWN of her
Supporter.
late MAJESTY,

Supporte:.
Second Gentleman Usher, Borne on a black vel. First Gentleman Usher,
Daily Waiter to her

vet cushion,

Daily Waiter to her
late MAJESTY,
by CLARENCEUX,

laie MAJESTY, Thomas GORE, Esq.

King of Arms.

G, W. VINCEXT, Esq.
Secretary to the
Lord Steward of

Master of his
Lord Steward, bis Majesty's Household, MAJESTY's Household,
T. BRENT, Esq. Marq. CHOLMONDELEY. Gen. Sam. HULSE,

Choir of Windsor.
Prebendaries.

Dean.

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Secretary to the Lord Chamberlain, Vice Chamberlain to his MAJESTY, John CALVERT, Esq.

Viscount JOCELYN. First Gentleman Usher,

GARTER, Gentleman Usher of the Black Daily Waiter to his MAJESTY, Principal King

Rod, H. Y. WORTHAM, Esq.

of Arms.

Sir THOMAS TYRWHIT, The Lord Chamberlain of his MAJESTY's Household — Marquis of HERTFORD.

THE ROYAL BODY, Covered with a fine Holland Sheet, and a Black Velvet Pal!, adorned with Ten Escocheons, carried hy Ten Yeomen of the Guard, under a

Canopy of Black Velvet,

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Earl of Liverpool, with the Sword of State.

CHIEF MOURNER,
H.R.H, the PRINCE Regent, supported by the Marq. Buckingham and SALIEBCRY.

Assistants and Train Bearers to the Chief Mourner.
Their R. H. Dukes of York and Sussex,

Train Bearers.
Master of the Horse to her late MAJESTY-Farl HARCOURT.

Lord Chamberlain to her late MAJESTY-Earl of Morton.
Secretary and Comptroller to her late MAJESTY—Sir HenRY F. CAMPBELL.
Private Secretary and Treasurer to her late MAJESTY— Major-Gen. HERBERT

TAYLOR. Mistress of the Robes- Marchioness of BATH. Ladies of the Bed Chamber-Countess HARCOURT, Viscountess SIDNEY, Countess of HARRINGTON, Countess of MACCLESFIELD, Viscountess MELVILLE,

Countess of CARDIGAN. Keepers of the Robes, Mrs. CHARLOTTE BECKENDORFF, Miss 6. BECKENDORFP. Women of the Bed Chamber to her late MAJESTY -llon. Mrs. A, M. Egerton, Lady RADSTOCK, Hon. Mrs. COURTENAY, A. Boyle, Mrs. Mary Gwyn,

Hon. Mrs. AUGUSTA LEIGA, Maids of Honour-Miss CAROLINE VERNON, Miss AUGUSTA BRUDEN ELL, Miss SEYMOUR COLMAN, Miss Lovisa WROTTESLEY, Miss ELIZABETH

COURTENAY, Miss LOUISA MURRAY.

Women Attendants on her late Majes rY.
Ten Gentlemen Pensioners, with their axes reversed.
Forty Yeomen of the Guard, with their partisans reversed.

The Royal Body having been borne to the steps of the Altar, was placed on a platform prepared to receive it ; the pall was removed, and the crowa and cushion placed upon the coffin. The Prince REGENT, as Chief Mouraer, being seated in a chair at the bead of the corpse, surrounded by bis Supporters and Train-bearers, standing, the funeral service commenced in the usual manner, as performed ia catbedrals, at the demise of the great and the illustrious.

Immediately on the entrance of the body into the Chapel, the Choir had commenced the impressive burial service, composed by Croft and PORCELL. The second verse, “ I know that my Redeemer liveth,was then played with exquisite tenderness, and as exquisitely sung by the principal vocal performers.

KENT's celebrated anthem of “ O Lord, hear my prayer.'" was dext sung at the express desire of the Prince Regest, by two boys from the Chapel Royal, and two from St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Their voices were extremely fine, and their delivery of the anthein highly impressive : after which the usual burial service was read by the Honourable and Reverend the Dean of Windsor.

During the performaoce of ihe anthem “Man that is born of woman," the platform was gradually lowered by imperceptible machinery, and at twenty. five minutes past pine o'clock, the car, and the coffin which it upheld, descended below the surface of the pavement. At the momeni of its dis. appearance, the Dean read the sublime passage, “ Forasmuch as it hath pleased Almighty God," &c. &c. - The next part of the service, “ I heard a voice from Heaven," was then sung by the Choristers, and the remainder of the office of interment read by the Dean.

Throughout the whole of this sad ceremony, all eyes were fixed on the Prince Regent, who seemed absorbed in grief. His Royal Higbness was long known to have been the favourite son of his August Mother; and this was that occasion when Glial piety shewed all its traits of genuine affection. The natural and suitable grief of his Royal Highness for the loss he bad now endured, was also augmented by the remembrance, that the remains of bis only child were deposited in the same vault. The splendour of royalty, and the pride of dominion, have no consolations for such an hour as this; and the grief of gazing, for the last time, on the coffio of a food mother is insupportable. As it is lowered in the tomb where we are never more to see her, whence we shall never hear again the sound of her voice, we feel as if one of the strongest and tenderest chords were torn from the breast. The soul weeps through all its inmost recesses, to know that the sacred shrive in which ils etbereal essence was first enkindled, has fallen tu ruin, and is now bleoded with common, lifeless earth. He too was her first. born,—the first who reflected back her maternal gladness. He was her favourite. lo bis adversity, for he had kis adversity, she loved bin stillshe solaced and advised bim, and her heart clung to him the more, the more he was afflicted. His prosperity was her nightly ineditation, and her waking thought was a prayer for the happiness and the safety of the future Monarch of ber People. The filial assiduity with which he attended her both before, and during her fatal illness, proved that her partiality

was well bestowed. He watched every evening by her bed-side with an attention which was honourable to himself, and exeniplary to the country, and now that he is finally separated from her, he stands the peculiar object of a generous Nation's sympathy.

There are few more trying epochs in human life, than following to the grave the remains of a beloved Parent; yet the sorrow with which we perform even that duty, may be heightened by accompanying circumstances, and it was so in the person of the Prince RFgent. Could he forget, while gazing upon the yawning vault which was to receive the ashes of his Mother, that there fou lay those of a Daughter, whom he had loved with a singleness of affection, that knew no rival? Could he forget, that within the very pre cincts of ibat spot where the sad fupereal pomp ushered one Parent to the sepulchre, another Pareot, heavily stricken by the hand of Providence, a forlorn, venerable Falber, wandered darkling through the chambers of his Royal Palace, unconscious,-happily unconscious,—of the mortality that has fallen upon his house. The sources of affliction may be indeed dried up in him, but the reflection that they are so, must open them anew in the bosoms of bis children. If imagination reverted but for a moment to his dreary loneliness, his quiet desolation, and his frightful stillness, what anguish must have followed !-Misfortune is a sacred passport to the kindliest feelings of our Nature; and when the loftier emotions of our nature are blended with it, the sorrows of the Throne become a common and a general grief. So is it with us now; and the public condolence which will reach bis Royal Highness, will spring from no frigid obedience to precedent and custom, but from a real anxiety to soothe his personal afflictions, by proving to him how deeply they are participated by the Empire at large.

The whole of these melancholy rites were finished before ten o'clock. Sir Isaac Heard, as Garter King at Arms, now at the close of his 881b year, came forward at the conclusion, and standing Dear the grave, in a voice tremulous from emotion and age, proclaimed the style and titles of her late Majesty. The Prince Regent, the Great Officers of State, and the Nobility present, then retired. As the mourners and attendants on this striking ceremony began slowly to separate and to quit the Chapel, the solema swell of the organ, which then struck up the “ Dead March" in Saul, produced at once the richest and most soothing effect. The numerous company separated without the least disorder or inconvenience; and in a few minutes after the obsequies of her late Majesty had closed, no vestige remained of the solemo pageantry wbich bad just passed before the eyes of the spectators.

The Prince Regint was repeatedly observed to shed tears during the sacred ceremony, though he struggled to maintain his wonted serenity and fortitude. As the coffin gradually receded froin view, his Royal Highness kept his eye fixed upon it. When it was no longer visible, he rose, and, Sir BENJAMIN BLOOMFIELD bearing his train, passed along the side of the opeo vault, towards the allar, aud left the Chapel by the Western Porch, accompanied by the Dukes of York and Sussex.

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