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The present work has been undertaken, to supply what has appeared to the author an important desideratum in American literature. Readers have long felt the want of a history of the United States, executed in a shape essentially different from any work yet placed in their hands; namely, a volume at once comprehensive, accurate, and full, yet comprised within such moderate limits as to give it the advantage of cheapness. We have already many histories of the United States, all more or less valuable. But those which contain the proper fulness of narrative, are too bulky to be afforded at a moderate price; and in those of smaller dimensions, it will be found that so many considerable portions of American history have been passed over without notice, and so many highly interesting topics either entirely neglected or dismissed with a brief and superficial allusion, that they are very little serviceable to a reader who wishes for a clear and comprehensive notion of his subject. Another objection to most works of this nature has been the harshness of their style, the dryness of their details in unimportant matters, and the general deficiency of spirit and picturesqueness in the narrative.

The author of the present volume has aimed, in his performance, to produce something which shall be found free from the above defects. It has been his intention, throughout, to make the work serviceable in the highest degree, both as a school-book and as a volume adapted to the fireside and the student's closet; to relate everything necessary to be known in the history of our country, with the utmost accuracy in the narrative and precision in the dates; and, at the same time, to preserve those interesting details, anecdotes, and illustrations, which constitute the life and soul of history, and without which such a work as this would become little better than a chronological table, or a dry and dull compilation of annals, difficult to read, and impossible to remember. As a necessary introduction to the work, it has been

- judged requisite to give a pretty copious account of the

original inhabitants of the western continent, and of the earliest conquests and settlements by other nations than the English, both in North and South America. It is believed that the present History comprises a more complete and accurate body of facts, in relation to the history of the United States and its subsidiary topics, than any volume of its size that has yet made its appearance among us. A plain and intelligible style of narration has been observed throughout the performance; and the sentiments and moral reflections which occasionally fall from the pen of the narrator, will, we trust, be found true to virtue, patriotism, and philanthropy.

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The ABorrernes of AMERICA.—Extent of the American aboriginal race-Speculations as to their origin—Identity of origin among all mankind —First peopling of America—Proximity of the old to the new continent— Comparative antiquity of the eastern and western races—Date of the original peopling of America—Native origin of American civilization— Want of connection in the aboriginal histories of North and South America—Antiquity of the Mexican annals—Primitive American legislators—Asiatic origin of the American race—Ancient American tribes-The Toltecs—Their migration from the northwest—The Chechemecas —The Aztecs–Legend of Quetzalcoatl—Foundation of Mexico—Cosmogony and religion of the Mexicans—Toltec tribes in the United States— Traditions of these people, - - - - - - - . 19

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Aborigines of AMERICA.—Different races of the Mexican conquerors— Origin of the custom of human sacrifices—Contrast with the Peruvians —Foundation of Mexico—Civilization of the Mexican people—Antiquities of Mexico—Destruction of the Mexican cities by the Spaniards—Population of the empire—Ancient ruins in Mexico–Palenque—Zacatecas— Copan—Uxmal—Chi-chen—Zayi, - - - - . 29

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Io Aborigines of AMERICA.—Warieties of the native Americans—North Ameri- can Indians—General description—The Esquimaux—The Blackfoot Indians—The Knisteneaux—The Mandans—their dances—The Indian “medicine” charm—Mandan cemeteries—The Camanches—their expert horsemanship—The Chippeways—The Sioux—their ornamented cradles —The Kaskaskias—Indian robes—South American Indians—The Peruvians—The Araucanians—The Abipones—The Patagonians—extravagant stories respecting their enormous stature—Present state of these Indians—The Fuegians—their wretched life and barbarous manners— Horrible cannibalism of these savages, . - - . . 40

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Discovernes AND Conquests of the SPANTARDs.—Ideas of the ancients respecting a western continent—Tradition of the Welsh in America— Discovery of America by the Northmen—Colony of Northmen in Rhode Island—Columbus—His projects of discovery–His efforts at the Spanish court—He is patronized by Queen Isabella—He discovers America— Notions of the Spaniards respecting India—Tobacco discovered in Cuba. —Return of Columbus—Exultation of the Spaniards—Second voyage of Columbus—Settlement made in the West India islands—Third voyage of Columbus—Discovery of the continent—Columbus arrested and sent to Spain—His fourth voyage—Ingratitude of the Spanish court toward Columbus—His death—Voyage and artifices of Amerigo Vespucci-Balboa discovers the South Sea—Invasion of Mexico by Cortez—He burns his ships and penetrates into the interior—Behavior of the Emperor Montezuma–The Spaniards enter the city of Mexico—Captivity and death of Montezuma–Disasters of the Spaniards—Siege and capture of Mexico —Subjugation of the whole empire—Conquest of Guatimala, . . 54

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Discoveries AND Conquests of the SPANIARDs.—Expedition of the Spaniards into the South Sea—Invasion of Peru by Pizarro and Almagro– Civil war in Peru—Intrigues of Pizarro—Negotiations between Atahualpa and Pizarro–Arrival of the Spaniards at Caxamalca—Treachery of Pizarro–Atahualpa seized by the Spaniards—Cruelties of the Spaniards —They subjugate and plunder the whole country—Expeditions to Chili, La Plata and Paraguay—Extirpation of the natives in the West Indies— Las Casas—Importation of negroes from Africa—Expedition of Ponce de Leon–Discovery of Florida—The Fountain of Youth—Invasion of Florida by Soto–Adventures of the Spaniards—The Indian princess, Cofachiqui–The temple of Tolomeco–The Cacique Tascaluza—Bloody battle of Mauvila—The Spaniards cross the Mississippi—Death of Soto— Sufferings and losses of the Spaniards—They abandon Florida, . 71

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Discovery of THE UNITED STATEs.—Voyage of the Cabots—Discovery of North America—Voyage of Cortereal—Voyage of Verazzani—Discovery of the whole coast of the United States—Voyage of Cartier—Discovery of the river St. Lawrence–Cartier ascends the river to Montreal—Expedition of Roberval to Canada–Failure of the early attempts of the French at colonization, - - - - - - - - - . 80

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SETTLEMENT of Virginia.-Sir Walter Raleigh's attempts to colonize Virginia—Voyage of Amidas and Barlow to North Carolina—Voyage of Grenville—Settlement at Roanoke–Prospects of gold in Virginia—The settlement abandoned—New colony at Roanoke, and its disastrous fate— Voyage of Newport and Gosnold–Captain Smith—Settlement of Jamestown—Sufferings of the colonists—Smith appointed to the command— His able conduct—Intrigues in the colony—Smith taken prisoner by the Indians—His life saved by Pocahontas—Wicissitudes of the settlers— Reinforcements arrive from England—Gold dust supposed to be discovered—Dust and cedar shipped from Virginia to England—Smith explores the waters of the Chesapeake—Indians from Canada arrive in the neighborhood–New charter of Virginia—New arrival of settlers— Lord Delaware appointed governor—Shipwreck of Sir George Somers on the island of Bermudas, . - - - - - - - . 88

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SETTLEMENT of Virginia.—Government of Smith—Hostilities of the Indians —Smith departs for England—The “Starving Time”—Despair of the colonists—Arrival of supplies from England—New charter of Virginia–

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- CONTENTs. ix

Capture of Pocahontas—Pacification with the savages—Use of tobacco in England—Administration of Argal—Yeardley's administration —A colonial assembly convoked—Emigration of females to Virginia—Transportation of convicts—Introduction of negro slavery—Virginia obtains a constitution—Conspiracy of Opechancanough—Massacre of the settlers— The British government become jealous of the Virginians—Grievances of the colonists—Indian wars—Bacon's rebellion—Conduct of Governor Berkeley–Temporary pacification—Vacillation of the governor—Renewal of the troubles—Convention of Middle Plantations—Further hostilities—Jamestown burnt—Sudden death of Bacon, and end of the rebellion—The royal authority restored—Disastrous consequences of these events to the Wirginians, - - - - - - . 105

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emigration to Holland—They resolve to emigrate to America—Sail from England—Their arrival at Cape Cod—Formation of a political compact— Landing at Plymouth—Hardships endured by them—Death of Governor Carver—Government of Mr. Bradford–Treaty with the Indian sachem, Massasoit—Scarcity of food in the colony—Severe drought, and providential relief—Origin of the New England thanksgivings—Foundation of the Massachusetts colony—Settlement of Salem—Arrival.of Governor Winthrop—Boston founded–Sufferings of the colonists—Severe frosts— Foundation of the New England churches—Attempts of the king to check emigration to New England, - - - . . . 121

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SETTLEMENT of New England.—Discovery of Connecticut river—Dispute

with the Dutch—First settlement of Connecticut—Fort Good Hope erected by the Dutch—Quarrel between the Dutch and the Plymouth men— Settlement of Hartford and Wethersfield by the English—Expedition of Hooker—Sufferings of the colonists—Lords Say and Seal—Charter for Connecticut—Breaking out of the Pequod war—Murder of Mr. Oldham— Expedition of the English against the Pequods—Barbarities of the savages —Mason's expedition—Alliance with the Narragansets—The forces march against the Pequods—Attack of the Indian fort at Mystic—Defeat and slaughter of the Pequods—General joy of the colony—Remarkable circumstances attending the victory, - - - - - . 131

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SETTLEMENT of New ENGLAND.—Consternation and flight of the Pequods—

Release of captives by the Dutch—Prosecution of the Pequod war—Capture of Pequods at Fairfield—Defeat and dispersion of the enemy— Treaty with Uncas and Miantonimoh–Total extirpation of the Pequods —Pacification of the colonies—Connecticut frames a constitution—Foundation of New Haven, . - - - - - - - . 149

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SETTLEMENT of New England.—New Hampshire explored by Captain

Smith—Settlements made by Gorges and Mason—Portsmouth founded— Union of the colony with Massachusetts—Roger Williams in Massachusetts—Settlement of Rhode Island—Anne Hutchinson and her adherents remove to Rhode Island—the colony obtains a charter—Maine–Settlements on the Kennebec—Charter of Gorges—Union of Maine with

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