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pital, i. 120, 121; paltry
excuses for the crime, i. 121-
126 ; his pretended marriage
under the name of Renou, i.
129; his Discourses, i. 132-
186 (see Discourses); writes
essays for academy of Dijon, i.
132; origin of first essay, i.
133-137 ; his visions for
thirteen years, i. 138 ; evil
effect upon himself of the first
Discourse, i. 138; ofit,the second
Discourse and the Social Con-
tract upon Europe, i. 138; his
own opinion of it, i. 138, 139 ;
influence of Plato upon him,
i. 146 ; second Discourse, i.
154 ; his “ State of Nature,”
i. 159 ; no evidence for it, i.
172; influence of Montesquieu
on him, i. 183 ; inconsistency
of his views, i. 124 ; influence
of Geneva upon him, i. 187, 188;
his disgust at Parisian philo-
sophers, i. 191, 192; the two
sides of his character, i. 193;
associates in Paris, i. 193; his
income, i. 196, 197, n.; post of
cashier, i. 196; throws it up,
i. 197, 198; determines to earn
his living by copying music, i.
198, 199; change of manners,
i. 201 ; dislike of the manners
of his time, i. 202, 203; assump-
tion of a seeming cynicism, i.
206; Grimm's rebuke of it, i.
206; Rousseau's protest against
atheism, i. 208, 209; composes
a musical interlude, the Village
Soothsayer, i. 212; his nervous-
ness loses him the chance of
a pension, i. 213 ; his moral
simplicity, i. 214, 215 ; revisits
Geneva, i. 216 ; re-conversion
to Protestantism, i. 220; his
friends at Geneva, i. 227 ; their

effect upon him, i. 227; returns
to Paris, i. 227; the Hermitage
offered

him by Madame
d'Epinay, i. 229, 230 (and ib.
n.); retires to it against the
protests of his friends, i. 231,
his love of nature, i. 234, 235,
236; first days at the Herni.
tage, i. 237 ; rural delirium, i.
237 ; dislike of society, i. 242 ;
literary scheme, i. 242, 243 ;
remarks on Saint Pierre, i. 246 ;
violent mental crisis, i. 247 ;
employs his illness in writing
to Voltaire on Providence, i.
250, 251 ; his intolerance of
vice in others, i. 254 ; acquaint-
ance with Madame de Hou-
detot, i. 255-269; source of
his irritability, i. 270, 271 ;
blind enthusiasm of his ad-
mirers, i. 273, also ib. n.;
quarrels with Diderot, i. 275 ;
Grimm's account of them, i.
276 ; quarrels with Madame
d'Epinay, i. 276, 288; relations
with Grimm, i. 279 ; want of
sympathy between the two,
i. 279 ; declines to accompany
Madame d'Epinay to Geneva,
i. 285; quarrels with Grimm,
i. 285 ; leaves the Hermitage,
i. 289, 290; aims in music,
i. 291 ; letter on French music,
i. 293, 294 ; writes on music
in the Encyclopædia, i. 296 ;
his Musical Dictionary, i. 296 ;
scheme and principles of his
new musical notation, i. 269; ex-
plained, i. 298, 299; its practi-
cal value, i. 299; his mistake,
i. 300; minor objections, i.
300 ; his temperament and
Genevan spirit, i. 303 ; com-
pared with Voltaire, i. 304,
305; had a more spiritual

element than Voltaire, i. 306;
its influence in France, i. 307 ;
early relations with Voltaire, i.
308 ; letter to him on his poeni
on the earthquake at Lisbon,
i. 312, 313, 314 ; reasons in a
circle, i. 316; continuation of
argument against Voltaire, i.
316, 317 ; curious notion about
religion, i. 317 ; quarrels with
Voltaire, i. 318, 319; denounces
him as a “trumpet of impiety,”
i. 320, n.; letter to D'Alembert
on Stage Plays, i. 321 ; true
answer to his theory, i. 323,
324 ; contrasts Paris and Gen-
eva, i. 327, 328; his patriotism,
i. 329, 330, 331 ; censure of
love as a poetic theme, 334,
335; on Social Position of
Women, i. 335; Voltaire and
D'Alembert's criticism on his
Letter on Stage Plays, i. 336,
337 ; final break with Diderot,
i. 336; antecedents of his
highest creative efforts, ii. 1 ;
friends at Montmorency, ii. 2;
reads the New Heloïsa to the
Maréchale de Luxembourg, ii.
2 ; unwillingness to receive
gifts, ii. 5; his relations with
the Duke and Duchess de
Luxembourg, ii. 7 ; misunder-
stands the friendliness of Ma-
dame de Boufflers, ii. 7 ; calm
life at Montmorency, ii. 8;
literary jealousy, ii. 8; last of
his peaceful days, ii. 9 ; advice
to a young man against the
contemplative life, ii. 10 ; offen.
sive form of his “good sense"
concerning persecution of Pro-
testants, ii. 11, 12; cause of
his unwillingness to receive
gifts, 13, 14; owns his un-
grateful nature, ii. 15; ill-

humoured banter, ii. 15; his
constant bodily suffering, ii.
16; thinks of suicide, ii. 16;
correspondence with the readers
of the New Heloïsa, ii. 19, 20;
the New Heloïsa, criticism on,
ii. 20-55 (see New Heloïsa); his
publishing difficulties, ii. 56 ;
no taste for martyrdom, ii. 59,
60; curious discussion between,
ii. 59; and Malesherbes, ii. 60 ;
indebted to Malesherbes in the
publication of Emilius, ii. 61,
62; suspects Jesuits, Jansenists,
and philosophers of plotting to
crush the book, ii. 63; himself
counted among the latter, ii.
65 ; Emilius ordered to be
burnt by public executioner,
on the charge of irreligious
tendency, and its author to be
arrested, ii. 65 ; his flight, ii.
67 ; literary composition on the
journey to Switzerland, ii. 69 ;
contrast between him and Vol.
taire, ii. 70; explanation of his
“natural ingratitude,” ii. 71;
reaches the canton of Berne,
and ordered to quit it, ii. 72 ;
Emilius and Social Contract
condemned to be publicly burnt
at Geneva, and author arrested
if he came there, ii. 72, 73;
takes refuge at Motiers, in
dominions of Frederick of
Prussia, ii. 73; characteristic
letters to the king, ii. 74, 77 ;
declines pecuniary help from
him, ii. 75 ; his home and
habits at Motiers, ii. 77, 78;
Voltaire supposed to have
stirred up animosity against
him at Geneva, ii. 81; Arch-
bishop of Paris writes against
him, ii. 83; his reply, and char-
acter as a controversialist, ii.

83-90; life at Val de Travers
(Motiers), ii. 91-95 ; his gener-
osity, ii. 93; corresponds with
the Prince of Wurtemberg on
the education of the prince's
daughter, ii. 95, 96 ; on Gibbon,
ii. 96; visit from Boswell, ii.
98; invited to legislate for
Corsica, ii. 99, n.; urges Boswell
to go there, ii. 100; denounces
its sale by the Genoese, ii. 102;
renounces his citizenship of
Geneva, ii. 103 ; his Letters
from the Mountain, ii. 104 ;
the letters condemned to be
burned at Paris and the Hague, ii.
105 ; libel upon, ii. 105; religious
difficulties with his pastor, ii.
106; ill-treatment of, in parish,
ii. 106 ; obliged to leave it,
ii. 108; his next retreat, ii. 108;
account in the Rêveries of his
short stay there, ii. 109-115 ;
expelled by government of
Berne, ii. 116; makes an ex-
traordinary request to it, ii.
116, 117; difficulties in find-
ing a home, ii. 117 ; short stay
at Strasburg, ii. 117, n.; decides
on going to England, ii. 118 ; his
Social Contract, and criticism
on, ii. 119, 196 (see Social
Contract); scanty acquaintance
with history, ii. 129 ; its effects
on his political writings, ii.
129, 136 ; his object in writing
Emilius, ii. 198 ; his confession
of faith, under the character of
the Savoyard Vicar(see Emilius),
ii. 257-280; excitement caused
by his appearance in Paris in
1765, ii. 282 ; leaves for Eng.
land in company with Hume,
ii. 283 ; reception in London,
ii. 283, 284 ; George III. gives
him a pension, ii. 284 ; his love

.

for his dog, ii. 286 ; finds a
home at Wootton, ii. 286 ;
quarrels with Hume, ii. 287 ;
particulars in connection with
it, ii. 287-296 ; his approaching
insanity at this period, ii. 296 ;
the preparatory conditions of
it, ii. 297-301 ; begins writing
the Confessions, ii. 301 ; their
character, ii. 301-304 ; life at
Wootton, ii. 305, 306 ; sudden
flight thence, ii. 306; kindness
of Mr. Davenport, ii. 306, 307;
his delusion, ii. 307 ; returns
to France, ii. 308 ; received at
Fleury by the elder Mirabeau,
ii. 310, 311; the prince of
Conti next receives him at
Trye, ii. 312; composes the
second part of the Confessions
here, ii. 312; delusion returns,
ii. 312, 313 ; leaves Trye, and
wanders about the country, ii.
312, 313; estrangement from
Theresa, ii. 313; goes to Paris, ii.
314; writes his Dialogues there,
ii. 314; again earns his living by
copying music, ii. 315; daily life
in, ii. 315, 316 ; Bernardin St.
Pierre's account of him, ii. 317-
321 ; his veneration for Fénelon,
ii. 321 ; his unsociality, ii. 322;
checks a detractor of Voltaire,
ii. 324 ; draws up his Con-
siderations on the Government
of Poland, ii. 324 ; estimate of
the Spanish, ii. 324; his poverty,
ii. 325 ; accepts a home at
Ermenonville from M. Girardin,
ii. 326 ; his painful condition,
ii. 326; sudden death, ii. 326;
cause of it unknown, ii. 326 (see
also ib. n.); his interment, ii. 326;
finally removed to Paris, ii. 328.

SAINTE BEUVE on Rousseau and

Madame d'Epinay, i. 279, n.;

on Rousseau, ii. 40.
Saint Germain, M. de, Rousseau's

letter to, i. 123.
Saint Just, ii. 132, 133 ; his

political regulations, ii. 133, n.;
base of his system, ii. 136 ;

against the atheists, ii. 179.
Saint Lambert, i. 244 ; offers

Rousseau a home in Lorraine,

ii. 117.
Saint Pierre, Abbé de, Rousseau

arranges papers of, i. 244 ; his
views concerning reason, ib.;
boldness of his observations, i.

245.
Saint Pierre, Bernardin de, account

of his visit to Rousseau at Paris,

ii. 317-321.
Sand, Madame G., i. 81, n.; Savoy

landscape, i. 99, n.; ancestry

of, i. 121, n.
Savages, code of morals of, i. 178-

179, n.
Savage state, advantages of, Rous-

seau's letter to Voltaire, i. 312.
Savoy, priests of, proselytisers, i.

30, 31, 33 (also ib. n.)
Savoyard Vicar, the, origin of

character of, ii. 257 - 280 (see

Emilius).
Schiller on Rousseau, ii. 192 (also

ib. n.); Rousseau's influence on,

ii. 315.
Servetus, ii. 180.
Simplification, the revolutionary

process and ideal of, i. 4 ; in
reference to Rousseau's inusic,

i. 291.
Social conscience, theory and de-

finition of, ii. 234, 235; the
great agent in fostering, ii.

237.
Social Contract, the, ill effect of,

on Europe, i. 138 ; beginning
of its composition, i. 177 ; ideas

of, i. 188; its harmful dreams,
i. 246; influence of, ii. 1; price
of, and difficulties in publish-
ing, ii. 59 ; ordered to be burnt
at Geneva, ii. 72, 73, 104 ; de-
tailed criticism of, ii. 119-196 ;
Rousseau diametrically opposed
to the dominant belief of his
day in human perfectibility, ii.
119; object of the work, ii.
120; main position of the two
Discourses given up in it, ii. 120;
influenced by Locke, ii. 120; its
uncritical, illogical principles,
ii. 123, 124 ; its impracticable-
ness, ii. 128 ; nature of his
illustrations, ii. 128-133; the
gospel of the Jacobins," ii.
132, 133; the desperate absur-
dity of its assumptions gave it
power in the circumstances of
the times, ii. 135-141; some of
its maxims very convenient for
ruling Jacobins, ii. 142; its
central conception, the sove-
reignty of peoples, ii. 144 ;
Rousseau not its inventor, ii.
144, 145 ; this to be distin-
guished from doctrine of right
of subjects to depose princes,
ii. 146 ; Social Contract idea of
government, probably derived
from Locke, ii. 150 ; falseness
of it, ii. 153, 154 ; origin of
society, ii. 154 ; ill effects on
Rousseau's political speculation,
ii. 155; what constitutes the
sovereignty, ii. 158 ; Rousseau's
Social Contract different from
that of Hobbes, ii. 159; Locke's
indefiniteness on, ii. 160; attri-
butes of sovereignty, ii. 163,
confederation, ii. 164, 165 ; his
distinction between tyrant and
despot, ii. 169, n.; distinguishes
constitution of the state from

that of the government, ii. 170; | Spectator, the, Rousseau's liking
scheme of an elective aristo- for, i. 86.
cracy, ii. 172 ; similarity to the Spinoza, dangerous speculations
English form of government, ii. of, i. 143.
173 ; the state in respect to re- Stael, Madame de, i. 217, n.
ligion, ii. 173 ; habitually illo-Stage players, how treated in
gical form of his statements, ii. France, i. 322.
173, 174 ; duty of sovereign to Stage plays (see Plays).
establish civil profession of State of Nature, Rousseau's, i.
faith, ii. 175, 176 ; infringe- 159, 160; Hobbes on, i. 161
ment of it to be punished, even (see Nature).
by death, ii. 176 ; Rousseau's Suicide, Rousseau on, ii. 16; a
Hobbism, ii. 177 ; denial of his mistake to pronounce him in-
social compact theory, ii. 183, capable of, ii. 19.
184 ; futility of his disquisi- Switzerland, i. 330.
tions on, ii. 185, 180; his de-
claration of general duty of
rebellion (arising out of the Tacitus, i. 177.
universal breach of social com- Theatre, Rousseau's letter, object-
pact) considered, ii. 188; it

ing to the, i. 133 ; his error in
makes government impossible,

the matter, i. 134.
ii. 188 ; he urges that usurped

Theology, metaphysical, Des-
authority is another valid

cartes' influence on, i. 226.
reason for rebellion, ii. 190;

Theresa (see Le Vasseur).
practical evils of this, ii. 192; | Thought, school of, division be-

historical effect of the Social
Contract, ii. 192-195.

alists, i. 337.
Social quietism of some parts of Tonic Sol-fa notation, close corre-
New Heloïsa, ii. 49.

spondence of the, to Rousseau's
Socialism: Morelly, and De Mably, Tronchin on Voltaire, i. 319, n.,

system, i. 299.
ii. 52 ; what it is, ii. 159.

321.
Socialistic theory of Morelly, i.
158, 159 (also i. 158, n.)

Turgot, i. 89; his discourses at
Society, Aristotle on, i. 174;

the Sorbonne in 1750, i. 155 ;
D'Alembert's statements on, i.

the one sane eminent French-
174, n.; Parisian, Rousseau

man of eighteenth century, i.
on, i. 209 ; dislike of, i. 242 ;

202, his unselfish toil, i. 233;
Rousseau's origin of, ii. 153 ;

ii. 1.93; mentioned, ii. 246, 294.
true grounds of, ii. 155, 156.

Turin, Rousseau at, i. 34-43 ;
Socrates, i. 131, 140, 232; ii.

leaves it, i. 45 ; tries to learn
72, 273.

Latin at, i. 91.

Turretini and other rationalisers,
Solitude, eighteenth century no-

i. 226; his works, i, 226, n.
tions of, i. 231, 232.
Solon, ii. 133.
Sorbonne, the, condemns Emilius, UNIVERSE, constitution of, dis.
ii. 82.

cussion on, i. 311-317.

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