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Luxembourg, the Duke of, gives 81 ; account of, ii. 80; on

Rousseau a home, ii. 2-7, 9. Boswell, ii. 98
Luxembourg, the Maréchale de, in Marmontel, on Rousseau's man.

vain seeks Rousseau's children, ners, i. 206 ; on his success, ii. 2.
i. 128 ; helps to get Emilius Marriage, design of the New
published, 63-64, 67.

Heloïsa to exalt, ii. 46 - 48, ib.
Lycurgus, ii. 129, 131; influence

of, upon Saint Just, ii. 133. Marsilio, of Padua, on Law, ii.
Lyons, Rousseau a tutor at, i. 95- 145.
97.

Men, inequality of, Rousseau's

second Discourse (see Dis-

courses), dedicated to the re-
MABLY, De, i. 95 ; his socialism, public of Geneva, i. 190 ; how

i. 184; applied to for scheme received there, i. 228.
for the government of Poland, Mirabeau the elder, Rousseau's
ii. 324.

letter to, from Wootton, ii. 305,
Maistre, De, i. 145; on Optimism, 306 ; his character, ii. 309-312;
i. 314.

receives Rousseau at Fleury, ii.
Maitre, Le, teaches Rousseau 311.
music, i. 58.

Mirabeau, Gabriel, Rousseau's
Malebranche, i. 87.

influence on, ii. 315.
Malesherbes, Rousseau confesses Molière (Misanthrope of), Rous-

his ungrateful nature to, ii. 14; seau's criticism on, i. 329;
his dishonest advice to Rous. D'Alembert on, i. 329.
seau, ii. 60 ; helps Diderot, Monarchy, Rousseau's objection
ii. 62; and Rousseau in the to, ii. 171.
publishing of Emilius, ii. 62, Montaigu, Count de, avarice of,
63 ; endangered by it, ii. 67 ; i. 101, 102.
asks Rousseau to collect plants Montaigne, Rousseau's obligations
for him, ii. 76.

to, i. 145; influence of, on
Wan, his specific distinction from Rousseau, ii. 203.

other animals, i. 161 ; his state Montesquieu, “incomplete posi-
of nature, i. 161; Hobbes wrong tivity” of, i. 156 ; on Govern-
concerning this, i. 161; equality ment, i. 157 ; effect of his
of, i. 180; effects of this Spirit of Laws on Rousseau, i.
doctrine in France and in the 183; confused definition of
United States, i. 182; not laws, ii. 153 ; balanced parlia-
naturally free, ii. 126.

mentary system of, ii. 163 ; his
Mandeville, 1. 162.

definition of forms of govern-
Manners, Rousseau's, Marmontel, mient, ii. 169.

and Grimm on, i. 205, 206 ; Montmorency, Rousseau goes to
Rousseau on Swiss, i. 329, 330 ; live there, i. 229; his life at, ii.
depravity of French, in the 2-9.

eighteenth century, ii. 25, 26. Montpellier, i. 92.
Marischal, Lord, friendship be- Morals, state of, in France in the
tween, and Rousseau, ii. 79- eighteenth century, ii. 26.
VOL. JI.

Z

Morellet, thrown into the Bastile, seau's, in Second Discourse, i.
ii. 57.

171-180; his starting-point of
Morelly, his indirect influence on right, and normal constitution
Rousseau, i. 156 ; his socialistic
i ;

of civil society, ii. 124. See
theory, i. 157, 158; his rules State of Nature.
for organising a model commun- Necker, ii. 54, 98, n.
ity, i. 158, n. ; his terse exposi- Neuchâtel, flight to principality
tion of inequality contrasted of, by Rousseau, ii. 73 ; history
with that of Rousseau, i. 170 ; of, ii. 73, n.; outbreak at, arising
on primitive human nature, i. from religious controversy, ii.
175; his socialism, ii. 52; influ- 90; preparations for driving
ence of his “model community' Rousseau out of, defeated by
upon St. Just, ii. 133, n. ; ad- Fyederick of Prussia, ii.90;clergy
vice to mothers, ii. 205.

of, against Rousseau, ii. 106.
Motiers, Rousseau's home there, New Heloïsa, first conception of,

ii. 77 ; attends divine service at, i. 250; monument of Rousseau's
ii. 91 ; life at, ii. 91, 93.

fall, ii. 1 ; when completed and
Moultou (pastor of Motiers), his published, ii. 2 ; read aloud to

enthusiasm for Rousseau, ii. 82. the Duchess de Luxembourg.
Music, Rousseau undertakes to ii. 3 ; letter on suicide in, ii.

teach, i. 60 ; Rousseau's opinion 16 ; effects upon Parisian ladies
concerning Italian, i. 105; effect of reading the, ii. 18, 19;
of Galuppi's, i. 105 ; Rousseau criticism on, ii. 20-55 ; his
earns his living by copying, i. scheme proposed in it, ii. 21 ;
196 ; ii. 315 ; Rameau's criticism its story, ii. 24 ; its purity,
on Rousseau's Muses Galantes, i. contrasted with contemporary
211; French, i. 291 ; Rousseau's and later French romances, ii.
letter on, i. 292 ; Italian, de- 24 ; its general effect, ii. 27 ;
nounced at Paris,i.292;Rousseau Rousseau absolutely without
utterly condemns French, i. 294 ; humour, ii. 27; utter selfishness
quarrels with Gluck for setting of hero of, ii. 30 ; its heroine, ii.

his, to French words, ii. 323. 30; its popularity, ii. 231, 232;
Musical notation, Rousseau's, i. burlesque on it, ii. 31, n. ; its

291 ; his Musical Dictionary, i. vital defect, ii. 35 ; difference
296 ; his notation explained, i. between Rousseau, Byron, and
296-301 ; his system inapplic- others, ii. 42; sumptuary de-

able to instruments, i. 301. tails of the story, ii. 44, 45;
NAPLES, drunkenness, how re- its democratic tendency, ii. 49,
garded in, i. 331.

50 ; the bearing of its teaching,
Narcisse, Rousseau's condemna- ii. 54 ; hindrances to its circula-

tion of his own comedy of, i. tion in France, ii. 57 ; Males.
215.

herbes's low morality as to pub-
Nature, Rousseau's love of, i. 234- lishing, ii. 61.

241; ii. 39; state of, Rousseau,
Montesquieu, Voltaire, and OPTIMISM of Pope and Leibnitz, i.
Hume on, i. 156-158 ; Rous- 309-310; discussed, ii. 128-130.

Origin of inequality among men, | Paul, St., effect of, on western
i. 156. See also Discourses. society, i. 4.

Peasantry, French, oppression of,
PALEY, ii. 191, n.

i. 67, 68.
Pańssot, ii. 56.

Pedigree of Rousseau, i. 8, n.
Paris, Rousseau's first visit to, i. Pelagius, ii. 272.

61 ; his second, i. 63, 97, Peoples, sovereignty of, Rousseau
102 ; third visit, i. 106 ; effect not the inventor of doctrine of,
in, of his first Discourse, i. 139, ii. 144-148; taught by Althusen,
no ; opinions in, on religion, i. 147; constitution of Helvetic
laws, etc., i. 185; “mimic Republic in 1798 ; a blow at,
philosophy there, i. 193 ; ii. 165.
society in, in Rousseau's time, Pergolese, i. 292.
i. 202-211 ; his view of it, i. Pestalozzi indebted to Emilius,
210; composes there his Múses ii. 252.
Galantes, i. 211; returns to, Philidor, i. 292.
from Geneva, i. 228; his belief Philosophers, of Rousseau's time,
of the unfitness of its people for contradicting each other, i. 87;
political affairs, i. 246 ; goes to, Rousseau's complaint of the, i.
in 1741, with his scheme of 202 ; war between the, and the
musical notation, i. 291; effect priests, i. 322 ; Rousseau's reac-
there of his letter on music, tionary protest against, i. 328;
i. 295; Rousseau's imaginary troubles of, ii. 59 ; parliaments
contrast between, and Geneva, hostile to, ii. 64.
i. 329 ; Emilius ordered to be Philosophy, Rousseau's disgust at
publicly burnt in, ii. 65; parlia- mimic, at Paris, i. 193; drew
ment of, orders “Letters from him to the essential in religion,
the Mountain” to be burnt, ii. i. 220; Voltaire's no perfect,
295; also Voltaire's Philosophi- i. 318.
cal Dictionary, ii. 295; Danton's Phlipon, Jean Marie, Rousseau's
scheme for municipal adminis- influence on, ii. 315.
tration of, ii. 168, n.; two parties Plato, his republic, i. 122 ; his in-
(those of Voltaire and of Rous- fluence on Rousseau, i. 146,
seau) in, in 1793, ii. 178; 325, n. ; Milton on his Laws,
excitement in, at Rousseau's ii. 178.
appearance in 1765, ii. 283 ; he plays (stage), Rousseau's letter
goes to live there in 1770, ii. on, to D'Alembert, i. 321 ; his
314 ; Voltaire's last visit to, ii. views of, i. 323; Jeremy Collier
323, 324.

and Bossuet on, i. 323 ; in
Pâris, Abbé, miracles at his tomb, Geneva, i. 333, 334, n. ; Rous-
ii. 88.

seau, Voltaire, and D'Alembert
Parisian frivolity, i. 193, 220, 329. on, i. 332-337.
Parliament and Jesuits, ii. 64. Plutarch, Rousseau's love for, i. 13.
Pascal, ii. 37.

Plutocracy, new, faults of, i. 195.
Passy, Rousseau composes the Pompadour, Madame de, and the

“Village Soothsayer" at, i. 212. Jesuits, ii. 64.

66

Pontverre (priest) converts Rous- confession of faith, ii. 176, 177,
seau to Romanism, i. 31-35. positive dogmas of this

, ii

. 176;
Pope, his Essay on Man translated Rousseau's pure Hobbism,"

by Voltaire, i. 309 ; Berlin ii. 177. See Savoyard Vicar
Academy and Lessing on it, i. (Emilius), ii. 256, 281.
310, n. ; criticism on it by Renou, Rousseau assumes name
Rousseau, i. 312; its general of, i. 129; ii. 312.
position reproduced by Rous- Revelation, Christian, Rousseau's
seau, i. 315.

controversy on, with Archbishop
Popelinière, M. de, i. 211.

of Paris, ii. 86-91.
Positive knowledge, i. 78. Rêveries, Rousseau's relinquishing
Press, freedom of the, ii. 59.

society, i, 199 ; description of
Prévost, Abbé, i. 48.

his life in the isle of St. Peter,
Projet pour l'Education, i. 96, n. in the, ii. 109-115 ; their style,
Property, private, evils ascribed ii. 314.

to i. 157, 185 ; Robespierre dis- Revolution, French, principles of,
claimed the intention of attack- i. 1, 2 ; benefits of, or other.
ing, i. 123, n.

wise, ii. 54 ; Baboufon, ii. 123,
Protestant principles, effect of 124, n. ; the starting point in

development of, ii. 146-147. the history of its ideas, ii. 160.
Protestantism, his conversion to, Revolutionary process and ideal

i. 220 ; its influence on Rous- i. 4, 5.
seau, i. 221.

Revolutionists, difference among,

i. 2.
RAMEAU on Rousseau's Muses Richardson (the novelist), ii. 25,
Galantes, i. 119, 211 ; men-

28.
tioned, 291.

Richelieu's brief patronage of
Rationalism, i. 224, 225; influence Rousseau, i. 195, 302.
of Descartes on, i. 225.

Rivière, de la, origin of society,
Réason, De Saint Pierre's views ii. 156, 157 ; anecdote of, ii.
of, i. 244.

156, 157, n.
Reform, essential priority of social Robecq, Madame de, ii. 56.
over political, ii. 43.

Robespierre, ii. 123, 134, 160,
Religion, simplification of, i. 3; 178, 179; his “sacred right

ideas of, in Paris, i. 186, 187, of insurrection," ii. 188, n.;
207, 208 ; Rousseau's view of, Rousseau's influence on, ii. 315.
i. 220 ; doctrines of, in Geneva, Rousseau, Didier, i. 8.
i. 223-227, also n. ; curious Rousseau, Jean Baptiste, i. 61, n.
project concerning it, by Rous- Rousseau, Jean Jacques, influence
seau, i. 317 ; separation of spirit- of his writings on France and
ual and temporal powers deemed the American colonists, i. 1, 2;
mischievous by Rousseau, ii. on Robespierre, Paine, and
173 ; in its relation to the state Chateaubriand, i. 3; his place
may be considered as of three as a leader, i. 3 ; starting-point,
kinds, ii. 175; duty of the of his mental habits, i. 4;
sovereign to establish a civil personality of, i. 4 ; influence on

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the common people, i. 5 ; his
birth and ancestry, i. 8 ; pedi-
gree, i. 8, n.; parents, i. 10, 11 ;
influence upon him of his
father's character, i. 11, 12;
his reading in childhood, i. 12,
13; love of Plutarch, i. 13 ;
early years, i. 13, 14 ; sent to
school at Bossey, i. 15 ; deteri.
oration of his moral character
there, i. 17 ; indignation at an
unjust punishment, i. 17, 18;
leaves school, i. 20 ; youthful
life at Geneva, i. 21, 22 ; his
remarks on its character, i. 24 ;
anecdotes of it, i. 22, 24 ; his
leading error as to the educa-
tion of the young, i. 25, 26;
religious training, i. 25; appren-
ticeship, i. 26 ; boyish doings,
i. 27 ; harshness of his master,
i. 27 ; runs away, i. 29; re-
ceived by the priest of Con-
fignon, i. 31 ; sent to Madame
de Warens, i. 34 ; at Turin,
i. 35 ; hypocritical conversion
to Roman Catholicism, i. 37;
motive, i. 38; registry of his bap-
tism, i. 38, n.; his forlorn con-
dition, i. 39; love of music, i.
39; becomes servant to Madame
de Vercellis, i. 39; his theft,
lying, and excuses for it, i. 39,
40; becomes servant to Count
of Gouvon, i. 42; dismissed,
i. 43; returns to Madame de
Warens, i. 45; his tempera-
ment, i. 46, 47 ; in training
for the priesthood, but pro-
nounced too stupid, i. 57 ; tries
music, i. 57; shamelessly aban-
dons his companion, i. 58 ;
goes to Freiburg, Neuchâtel, and
Paris, i. 61, 62; conjectural
chronology of his movements
about this time. i. 62, n. ; love

of vagabond life, i. 62-68;
effect upon him of his inter-
course with the poor, i. 68;
becomes clerk to a land sur-
veyor at Chambéri, i. 69 ; life
there, i. 69-72 ; ill-health and
retirement to Les Charmettes,
i. 73; his latest recollection of
this time, i. 75-77 ; his “form
of worship,” i. 77; love of
nature, i. 77, 78; notion of
deity, i. 77 ; peculiar intellec-
tual feebleness, i. 81 ; criticism
on himself, i. 83 ; want of logic
in his mental constitution, i.
85 ; effect on him of Voltaire's
Letters on the English, i. 85;
self-training, i. 86 ; mistaken
method of it, i. 86, 87 ; writes
a comedy, i. 89; enjoyment
of rural life at Les Charmettes,
i. 91, 92; robs Madame de
Warens, i. 92; leaves her, i.
93; discrepancy between dates
of his letters and the Confes-
sions, i. 93 ; takes a tutorship
at Lyons, i. 95 ; condemns the
practice of writing Latin, i.
96, n. ; resigns his tutorship,
and goes to Paris, i. 97; re.
ception there, i. 98-100; ap-
pointed secretary to French
Ambassador at Venice, i. 100-
106 ; in quarantine at Genoa,
i. 104 ; his estimate of French
melody, i. 105; returns to
Paris, i. 106 ; becomes ac-
quainted with Theresa Le Vas-
seur, i. 106; his conduct criti-
cised, i. 107-113; simple life,
i. 113 ; letter to her, i. 115-
119; his poverty, i. 119;
becomes secretary to Madame
Dupin and her son-in-law, M.
de Francueil, i. 119; sends his
children to the foundling hos-

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