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never been suggested, but which I attribute the low state of practical think will bear examination, I religion in the case of far too many conceive the phraseology in the of our laity and clergy, that I am passage in question to be strictly anxious the consideration of the parallel to that of Genesis iii. 14., subject should be extended beyond where the Almighty pronounces the mere passing remark ; particuserpent, “cursed above all cattle.” larly in reference to the theological The construction in the Septuagint, pursuits of students for holy orbears a most striking accordance ders, and, I may add, of academito that of St. Paul, (Erikatapatos OU

cal students in general. ΑΠΟ παντων των κτηνων. αναθεμα In the case of Oxford, consider. ειναι ΑΠΟ του χριστου): and it seems able attention has of late years to me higbly probable, that the been devoted to the science of blessed A posile, whose whole mind divinity; and from the ample inwas full of the doctrines of the fall vestigation which the subject has and the redemption,-whose heart undergone at Cambridge, it may, was melted by the love of Christ, I think, be confidently predicted, in becoming a curse" for the that it will not be very long before whole human race,--in contemplat- some measures are adopted, in that ing the dreadful obstinacy of his university also, for adding Chriscountrymen, was led to break out tian theology to the pursuits neces. into an impassioned wish, that he sary for the attainment of a degree. could convert them, even at the The wish to do so is, I believe, expense of being himself made a very general; so that the chief curse above Christ. There were no difficulties regard only the details bounds to the ignominy he could of the question, as connected with be content to undergo for the great Cambridge babits and institutions. object so near his heart : he would It is not, however, iny present purbear, if possible, even the measure pose to touch upon points of this of contempt and reprobation heaped nature ; but solely to remind your on the Redeemer himself, or, if it readers, tbat, after all, little is done could even be exceeded, he would for the extension of religion by the still be willing to endure it. mere application of the buman in

To this view of the passage I see tellect to the critical studies of no objection either on the score of theology. Such an application is doctrine, or of grammatical con- indeed highly valuable and desirastruction ; but, if I am in error, I ble; but it is at best but a small shall be happy to be corrected by part of what the exigencies of the some of your learned correspon present times, and, I may add, of dents.

all times, demand. I could wish to D.R. N.

see it embossed in conspicuous characters on the gates of our

colleges; on the walls of our To the Editor of the Christian Observer. endowed and national, and all other In your last Number, in the review academical, institutions; on the of “ Pamphlets on the Infidelity of doors of the examinatiou-rooms of the Times," occurs the following our episcopal palaces; over every observation (p. 98): “We may theological library in the kingdom; remark of most large schools, whe- and on the title-page of every ther for rich or poor, that religious volume of critical, controversial, knowledge, rather than religious and argumentative divinity, that duty, is the object of solicitude.'' “knowledge (when alone] puffeth I so fully agree with your reviewer up; but charity (Christian love to in the truth of his observation; God and man) editieth.” Science, and am so strongly convinced, that even the science of divinity itself, to this grievous defect we must is not religion, any more than the science of ethics is practical mora- work is not printed for sale, but lity. The importance of the cri- “is distributed as presents to a few tical studies of theology can friends, for the sake of that part of scarcely be too highly estimated in its contents which relates to the their place : every scholar who lives celebrated verse of St. Joho, in under the influence of Christian his first Epistle ; the authenticity principles, feels doubly the value of which he hopes to prove on of his scholarship, and only laments grounds of external evidence, ay that it is not far greater ; as almost well as internal, by Greek autho. every attainment he can possess, rities as well as Latin*.” In the when dedicated to the service of course of his remarks his lordship God, and made the handmaid to adverts to what he considers, and sacred studies, is found by him to justly, “a very great misrepresentabe of use in the elucidation of the tion," which occurs in the Theoloinspired volume. It is not there. gical Lectures of the present Bifore, I think, without the strongest shop of Peterborough, in refergrounds, that yourself, Mr. Editor, ence to the late Bishop Cleaver's and your correspondents, have so « list of books for the younger frequently and 'zealously insisted clergy." The chief occasion, bowupon the importance of the critical ever, of the Bishop of St. David's studies of theology, aud have animadversion, and, I may add, of urged the younger clergy especially the present reference to it, is not to become competently versed in merely that the Bishop of Peterthe learning, as well as to be en- borough has done “ injustice” to dued with the moral qualifications, Bishop Cleaver, but that his reof their profession. There are, marks “ appear calculated to mishowever, dangers in this as in most lead the younger clergy, by con. other questions on both sides; and founding the order of their stuI think I should not err if I added, dies, and withdrawing their atten. that the danger in our universities, tion from what ought to be the and indeed in all places of learned first and last object of their minisresort, is far greater on the one try.This is a grave charge, but side than on the other. I trust I his lordsbip fully substantiates it. shall not appear invidious in my Having stated the Bishop of Peterremarks, if I urge, as an illustration borough's objection, that "there strongly in point, the line of semi- is nothing like system" in Bishop theological studies to which the Cleaver's arrangement of books, labours of the present Bishop of his lordship observes:Peterborough have chiefly directed " Its purpose was to assist the the attention of Cambridge students. younger clergy in such a prosecu. I select this example the rather tion of their studies, as might best because I am enabled to fortify my qualify them for the duties of their remarks by the authority of one of profession. And what are the senthe ripest scholars, and most deeply timents and attainments necessary read biblical critics, whom the Church of England can at present * His lordship, in addition to some preboast; I mean the pious and fatory remarks on the subject, in his Col. learned Bishop of St. David's. lo lection of Tracts on the Divinity of our the course of last summer, amidst Lord, has recently published the work his indefatigable labours, his lordo bere alluded to, entitled “ A Vindication

of 1 John v. 7. from the objections of M. ship found time to carry through Griesbach; in which is given a new the press a work small in bulk, but View of the external Evidence, with of great erudition, entitled “A Greek Authorities for the Autheuticity Vindication of Bishop Cleaver's Edi. of the Verse not hitherto adduced in tion of the Decretum Lacedæmo. its Defence.” Rivingtons and Hatchard. niorum contra Timotheum." The 1821. Price 3s. 6d.

Union of critical and devotional Studies in Theology. 137 for their acquitting themselves best posed than the Professor's (Dr in their profession?

Marsh's) own system of theology. “ 1. A strong sense of duty. To lay the foundation of theology

“2. A devout feeling and exercise io a critical knowledge of the maof personal religion.

nuscripts, various readings, and edi. "3. A decided conviction of the tioos of the Scriptures, is inverttruth of Christianity.

ing the order of theological stu“4. A thorough knowledge of the dies. It can have no general or Scripture ; namely,

practical influence on the ministry “ 5. Its doctrines ;

of the church. It lends no aid to “ 6. Its ordinances; and

the conversion of the infidel, or 10 “7. A zealous and practical at the instruction of the ignorant. The tachment to the church of which great cardinal passages of Scripthey are members.

ture derive no benefit

from it. Pa. “ These are the sentiments and tricius Junius was converted by attainments prescribed by the Bic reading the first chapter of St. John; shop of St. Asaph. And how are Lord Lyttelton, by the conversion they to be acquired ?

of St. Paul; and Gilbert West, by " 1. By the study of professional the evidences of Christ's resurrecduties.

tion. If ή των λογων κρισις πολλης “ 2. By prayer:

εστι πειρας ΤΕΛΕΥΤΑΙΟΝ επιγεν“ 3. By examining the evidences mua, the criticism of the Bible, of Christianity.

in the sense here adverted to, “4. By the daily study of the should be among the last branches Scripture, (with the aid of com- of theology, instead of the first. ments and other subsidiary means); By making it a large and promi

“5. In all its doctrines of faith Dent part of theology, it fixes the and works;

mind on the subsidiary means of “6. And the ordinances of Christ the science, rather than the ond. and his Apostles;

Its end is seen in its very name. 7. And by a comprehensive Theology is Doctrina de Deo; and knowledge of ecclesiastical history, Christian theology is Doctrina de especially of their own church, and Christo Deo. Among the ancient of ecclesiastical law as far as con- Fathers, theology was the doctrine cerns the rights of the church, and of Christ's Divinity. In this sense the correct performance of their they understood the words Deodoyety ordinary duties."

and θεολογια. The knowledge of The Bishop of St. David's then Christ then, and of the means of proceeds to shew that Bishop Clea- man's salvation, should be the gover's classification corresponds with verning principles in Christian theotbis enumeration; though, not being logy; and the foundation of it, as a intended as a strictly systematical science, sbould be laid in such preanalysis of subjects, it is scarcely paratory grounds as point directly fair to submit it to such a test. It and obviously to those great subwas quite sufficient if it answered jects which are the ends of Christhe purpose of convenient arrange- tian theology." ment. The Bishop of St. David's, His lordship adds : however, remarks:

“ As all our knowledge of these “I can bardly conceive a course subjects is derived from God's reof professional reading more cal. velation of his will in the Scripculated to make a conscientious, tures, whatever tends to certify the able, and useful minister of the truth of the Christian revelation, Church of England, than that which and explain the languages in which is prescribed by the Bishop of St. the Scriptures are written, must Asaph's list of books. It appears ever be a necessary subject of theoto me much more judiciously dis- logy. But Providence bas so mer

CHRIST. OBSERV. No. 243.

loop

science of ethics is practical mora- work is not printed for sale, but lity. The importance of the cri- "is distributed as presents to a few tical studies of theology can friends, for the sake of that part of scarcely be too highly estimated in its contents which relates to the their place : every scholar who lives celebrated verse of St. John, in under the influence of Christian his first Epistle; the authenticity principles, feels doubly the value of which he hopes to prove on of his scholarship, and only laments grounds of external evidence, ay that it is not far greater; as almost well as internal, by Greek autho. every attainment he can possess, rities as well as Latin*.” In the when dedicated to the service of course of his remarks his lordship God, and made the handmaid to adverts to what he considers, and sacred studies, is found by him to justly, "a very great misrepresentabe of use in the elucidation of the tion,” wbich occurs in the Theoloinspired volume. It is not there. gical Lectures of the present Bifore, I think, without the strongest shop of Peterborough, in refergrounds, that yourself, Mr. Editor, ence to the late Bishop Cleaver's and your correspondents, have so " list of books for the younger frequently and zealously insisted clergy.” The chief occasion, howupon the importance of the critical ever, of the Bishop of St. David's studies of theology, and have animadversion, and, I may add, of urged the younger clergy especially the present reference to it, is not to become competently versed in merely that the Bishop of Peter. the learning, as well as to be en- borough has done “ injustice to dued with the moral qualifications, Bishop Cleaver, but that his reof their profession. There are, marks “appear calculated to mis. however, dangers in this as in most lead the younger clergy, by con. other questions on both sides; and founding the order of their stuI think I should not err if I added, dies, and withdrawing their atten. that the danger in our universities, tion from what ought to be the and indeed in all places of learned first and last object of their minisresort, is far greater on the one try." This is a grave charge, but side than on the other. I trust I bis lordship fully substantiates it. shall not appear invidious in my Having stated the Bishop of Peterremarks, if I urge, as an illustration borough's objection, that "there strongly in point, the line of semi- is nothing like system” in Bishop theological studies to which the Cleaver's arrangement of books, labours of the present Bishop of his lordship observes:Peterborough have chiefly directed " Its purpose was to assist the the attention of Cambridge students. younger clergy in such a prosecuI select this example the rather tion of their studies, as might best because I am enabled to fortify my qualify them for the duties of their remarks by the authority of one of profession. And what are the senthe ripest scholars, and most deeply timents and attainments necessary read biblical critics, whom the Church of England can at present * His lordship, in addition to some preboast; I mean the pious and fatory remarks on the subject, in his Col. learned Bishop of St. David's. In lection of Tracts on the Divinity of our the course of last summer, amidst Lord, has recently published the work his indefatigable labours, his lordo bere alluded to, entitled “ A Vindicatiou ship found time to carry through Griesbach; in which is given a new

of 1 John v. 7. from the objections of M. the press a work small in bulk, but View of the exteroal Evidence, with of great erudition, entitled “A Greek Authorities for the Autheuticity Vindication of Bishop Cleaver's Edi. of the Verse not hitherto adduced in tion of the Decretum Lacedæmo. its Defence.” Rivingtons and Hatchard. niorum contra Timotheum." Thé 1821, Price 3s. 6d.

one of them being directed to be former as one of the means by used becomes thereby entitled to which the latter is to be performed; the preference ; and, when a habit and am persuaded that the reveis acquired of departing from an rence wbich is felt for a parish mi. established regulation in trifles, it nister, not from personal but offibecomes more easy to consent to do cial considerations, is a reverenee it in points of greater importance. in its measure truly religious, which

I am disposed, however, to give may be forfeited indeed by gross tbe consideration of this question misconduct on his part, but ought a more serious turn. The spirit of for our own sake to be cherished as man is naturally so lawless and in- long as it is possible to retain it. dependent, that it is a salutary dis- Indeed, even where the church cipline to be obedient to direction, service is performed with some deand (I would add) more especially gree of inattention, and the doctrine as respects trides; for as in trifles of the pulpit is of a defective cbathere is less temptation to provoke, racter, so much still remains in the and less excuse to warrant, dis. text, the lessons, and the liturgy obedience, so, on the other hand, itself, as well as in the established a man who carries bis principle of order of worship-if not to awaken submission to lawful authority into

a heedless sinner, yet to build up such particulars, and obeys, not

a sincere Christian—that I think a only where he sees paramount rea

may will do well to consider masons for the rule, but also where turely before he determines on it directs his choice between modes forsaking the parochial ministraof proceeding in themselves in- tions of his church. Would he, in different, is less likely to be way- such circumstances, but be regular ward and self-willed in any other in bis attendance on divine worsbip, case, where a duty is recommended devout in his use of the liturgical to bim by stronger and plainer service, and diligent in deriving principles of particular application. what instruction he can from the

I cannot but think that this discourses of his minister; would single consideration ought to have be, on his return home, make the silenced all the contests in a former subject of the sermon a matter of age about the use of a surplice and private study, and pray earnestly the lawfulness of particular forms. for the Divine guidance in bis own It is useful to bring the mind to a examination of the Scriptures, and habit of constant conformity to ap for ibe Divine illumination and blesspointed rules, in matters where con- ing on his appointed pastor, he formity is innocent, as a remedy for might often make a more profitable that haughty spirit of independence use even of defective ministrations which is at variance with ihe humic than can be expected under a diflity of true religion. There is also ferent system, however zealous the a satisfaction in feeling that the minister, or pure his doctrine, or course pursued is a course pre- acceptable his labours. The reli. scribed by lawful autbority, and gion of our age and country is that in adoptiog it we are not ex

too little of a self-denying and ercisiog a discretion, but comply- self-mortifying character; and if ing with a duty.

in all our sacred duties we were The same principle may also be more ready to suspect our own corof service in answering ihe ques. rectness, whenever we go about to tion of " A Lover of Evangelical please ourselves by unauthorised Preaching,” in your Number for innovations, it would detract noSeptember; for though I would not thing either from the purity of the in any case set the duty of confor- church, or from the beneficial inmity above the duty of working fluence of its services upon our out our salvation, 1 yet regard the minds and conduct.

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