The Emotions and the Will

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John W. Parker, 1859 - 649 páginas
 

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Differences in the conscious mode or feeling proper
31
Intellectual characters of Emotion
37
CHAPTER II
56
PAGE
68
CHAPTER V
73
Species of Terror Timidity of the Lower Animals
81
Distrust of our Faculties in unfamiliar operations
87
TENDER EMOTION
94
Diffusive action or Expression
100
The power of sustaining volition in absence a compound
102
The Benevolent Affections
112
Admiration and Esteem
118
Elements of the Religious Sentiment
121
56
125
SELFGRATULATION AND SELFESTEEM
128
Selfesteem Selfconceit Selfconfidence
134
Arts of Politesse
140
Bearing of education or culture on the emotions of self
142
1
145
The proper pleasure of power implies difficulty
149
Working for objects of affection
155
Jealousy
161
THE IRASCIBLE EMOTION
163
Antipathy
174
Noble Rage
180
Expression of the attitude of pursuit
186
Operations of industry as involving the emotion of pur
191
Pains connected with pursuit
198
Comparisons in Poetry Harmony in the Fine Arts
204
CHAPTER XII
210
Character for infectiousness proper to the various simple
216
Obstructions of sympathy
221
CHAPTER XIII
228
Repetition and habit may give an emotional bent
234
Daydreams and illusions of the fancy based upon
241
CHAPTER XIV
247
Senses of Hearing
253
Melody and Harmony in Sound Pleasing and con
259
Melody of Speech
262
Light and Shade
263
Straight Outlines
264
Curved Outlines
266
Pressure and Support
267
port
268
Appearance of Ease in objects employed in giving sup 23 Symmetry
269
Note on Complex Harmonies Unity Variety
270
Fitness the Æsthetic of Utility
271
Order Cleanliness Polish 27 The Sublime Objects and emotion
273
Sublime of Support The mountain precipice and abyss ib 29 Sublimity of Space Commanding prospects in scenery
274
Greatness of Time
275
Sublime of the Human Character
276
Natural Objects in general Mineral and Vegetable Kingdoms Surface of the globe
277
The selfformed or Independent conscience
318
THE PRIMITIVE ELEMENTS OF VOLITION
327
Circumstances governing the spontaneous discharge
335
Link for connecting spontaneous movements with
342
GROWTH OF VOLUNTARY POWER
351
Feelings of Respiration Warmth and Chillness
357
Snuffing sweet Odours and recoiling from the opposite
363
Movements to attain the pleasures or avoid the pains
369
Chase for food by the lower animals
375
Faculty of Imitation
381
Imitation of movements of the features Teaching
388
Working to pleasure or from pain in idea
393
The direct power of the will confined to the muscular
400
Control of the feelings a good test of the volitional energy
407
Constructive association a voluntary process
414
CHAPTER V
420
Of aggregated derivative and intermediate ends
428
State of antipathy or disgust
435
CHAPTER VI
441
The same pleasure or pain acting on different occasions
447
The link between present action and present feeling
451
Conflict between ideal ends 453
453
Deliberation a voluntary act prompted by the known
457
Ungratified desire has to be met in other ways Simple
483
Examples of ideal activity
489
Susceptibility to ideal inflammation
496
Other physical circumstances
498
Examples The habit of early rising
505
Sentiment of Power Command of the Temper
512
Repression of Desire Contentment
515
Promptings supplied from without
521
Duty Selfpromptings
527
The Independent Conscience
532
CHAPTER VIII
539
Necessity
548
Consciousness of Freewill Is consciousness an infallible
555
Assertions that have been put forward under the infal
561
DESIRE
568
Belief in coming evil
577
Belief accompanies action and precedes experience
583
Opposition of confidence and fear
590
How can we be said to believe in things beyond
596
Prevalent meanings of the term consciousness
605
Neutral excitement has a positive efficacy as regards
612
Points of contrast of the emotional and intellectual con
620
Agreement causes a mental shock if accompanied with
626
Perception means sensation and something more
633
Sensation and perception presupposed
635
The use of language fixes attention on select impressions
641
118
647
Mental agencies concerned in supporting a wave of ideal
649

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Página 87 - ... where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling...
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Página 87 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod...
Página 27 - I will omit much usual declamation on the dignity and capacity of our nature; the superiority of the soul to the body, of the rational to the animal part of our constitution ; upon the worthiness, refinement, and delicacy, of some satisfactions, or the meanness, grossness, and sensuality, of others ; because 1 hold that pleasures differ in nothing, but in continuance and intensity...
Página 286 - Perhaps it was right to dissemble your love, But why did you kick me down stairs...
Página 92 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Página 255 - Among these several kinds of beauty the eye takes most delight in colours. We no where meet with a more glorious or pleasing show in nature than what appears in the heavens at the rising and setting of the sun, which is wholly made up of those different stains of light that show themselves in clouds of a different situation.
Página 147 - As we advance in years, and as our animal powers lose their activity and vigour, we gradually aim at extending our influence over others, by the superiority of fortune and of situation, or by the still more flattering superiority of intellectual endowments ; by the force of our understanding ; by the extent of our information ; by the arts of persuasion, or the accomplishments of address. What but the idea of power pleases the orator, in...
Página 286 - Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea.
Página 146 - Whenever we are led to consider ourselves as the authors of any effect, we feel a sensible pride or exultation in the consciousness of Power ; and the pleasure is, in general, proportioned to the greatness of the effect, compared to the smallness of our exertion.

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