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was of pure gold, most elaborately carved, and covered with designs illustrative of points of the Egyptian annals. Our wine cups were also of gold, enriched with precious stones; and for each kind of wine, a different cup, set with jewels, typical of the character of the wine for which it was intended. These were all by the hand of Demetrius. It was in all respects a Roman meal, in its fashions and conduct, though the table was spread with many delicacies peculiar to the Orientals. The walls and ceiling of the room, and the carpets represented, in the colors of the most eminent Greek and Persian artists, scenes of the life and reign of the great Queen of Egypt, of whom Zenobia reckons herself a descendant. Cleopatra was all around, above, and beneath us. Music at intervals, as the repast drew toward a close, streamed in from invisible performers, and added a last and crowning charm. The conversation was light and sportful, taking once or twice only, and accidentally, as it were, a political turn. These graceful Palmyrenes act a winning part in all the high courtesies of life; and nothing could be more perfect than their demeanor, free and frank, yet never forgetful of the presence of Zenobia, nor even of me, a representative in some manner of the majesty of Rome.

The moon, nearly at her full, was already shining bright in the heavens, when we left the tables, and walking first for a time upon the cool pavements of the porticos of the palace, then descended to the gardens, and separating in groups, moved away at will among their endless windings. Zenobia, as if desiring some private conference with her great teacher, left us in company with Longinus. It was my good and happy fortune to find myself in the society of Julia and Fausta, with whom I directed my steps toward the remoter and more quiet parts of the garden — for nearer the palace there was still to be heard the sounds of merriment, and of the instruments, furnishing a soft and delicious entertainment for such as chose to remain longer in the palace. Of the rest of the company, some like ourselves wandered

among

the labyrinthian walks of this vast pleasure-ground, while others, already weary, or satisfied with enjoyment, returned early to their homes.

The evening, shall I say it, was worthy of the company now abroad to enjoy it.

A gentle breeze just swayed the huge leaves of the to mestrange plants which overhung the paths, and came, as it here always seems to come, laden with a sweetness which in Rome it never has, unless added by the hand of Art. Dian's face shone never before so fair and bright, and her light, coming to us at frequent turns in our walk, through the spray of numerous fountains, caused them to show like falling diamonds. A divine repose breathed over the whole scene, I am sure our souls were in harmony with it.

Princess,' said I, 'the gardens of Nero can have presented no scenes more beautiful than these. He who designed these avenues, and groups of flowers and trees, these frequent statues and fountains, bowers and mimic temples, and made them bear to each other these perfect proportions and relations, had no less knowledge, methinks, of the true principles of taste, and of the very secrets of beauty, than the great Longinus himself.

The beauty is so rare, that it effects the mind almost like greatness itself. In truth, in perfect beauty there is always that which overawes.'

• I cannot say,' replied Julia, “that the learned Greek was the archi

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tect and designer of these various forms of beauty. The credit, I believe, is rather due to Periander, a native Athenian, a man, it is universally conceded, of the highest genius. Yet it is at the same time to be said, that the mind of Longinus presided over the whole. took not less delight in ordering the arrangements of these gardens, than he did in composing that great treatise, not long published, and which you must have seen before you left Rome. He is a man of universal powers. You have not failed to observe his grace not less than his abilities — while we were at the tables. You have seen that he can play the part of one who would win the regards of two foolish girls, as well as that of first minister of a great kingdom, or that of the chief living representative and teacher of the philosophy of the immortal Plato.'

* For myself,' I replied, ' I could hardly withdraw myself from the simple admiration of his noble head and form, to attend, so as to judge of it, to what fell from his lips. It seems to me that if a sculptor of his own Greece sought for a model of the human figure, he could hope to find none so perfect as that of Longinus.'

• That makes it the foolisher and stranger,' said Fausta, 'that he should labor at his toilet as he so manifestly does. Why can he not rely, for his power over both men and women, upon his genius, and his natural graces. It might be well enough for the Stagyrite to deck his little person in fine clothes, and cover his fingers with rings — for I believe there must be something in the outward appearance to strike the mere sensual eye, and please it, either natural or assumed — or else even philosophers might go unheeded. I doubt if upon my fingers there be more or more glowing rings than upon those of Longinus. To be sure, one must admit that his taste is exquisite.'

* In the manners and dress of Longinus,' said I, as well as in those of Aristotle, we behold, I think, simply the power of custom. They were both, in respect to such things, in a state of indifference — the true philosophical state. But what happened ? Both became instructors and companions of princes, and the inmates of royal palaces. Their manners and costume were left, without a thought, I will dare to say, on their part, to conform themselves to what was around them. Would it not have been a more glaring piece of vanity, if in the palace of Philip, Aristotle had clothed himself in the garb of Diogenes? - or if Longinus, in the presence of the great Zenobia, had appeared in the sordid attire of Timon ?

• I think so,' said Julia.

• Your explanation is a very probable one,' added Fausta, 'and had not occurred to me. It is true, the courts may have dressed them and not themselves. But never, I still must think, did a rich dress fall upon more willing shoulders than upon those of the Greek, always excepting, Julia, Paul of Antioch.' Ah, Fausta,' said Julia, 'you cannot, do what you

will, shake my faith in Paul. If I allow him vain, and luxurious, and haughty, I can still separate the advocate from the cause. You would not condemn the doctrine of Aristotle, on the ground that he wore rings. Nor can I altogether, nor in part, that of Paul, because he rolls through the city in a gilded chariot, with the attendance of a prince. I may blame or despise him — but not therefore reject his teaching. That has a defence independent of him. And that he has always frankness enough to say.

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power.

Policy, and necessity of time and place, have compelled him to much which his reason disproves. This he has given me to believe — and has conjured me on this, as on all subjects, to yield my mind only to evidence, apart from all personal considerations. But I did not mean to turn our conversation in this direction. Here, Piso, have we now arrived in our walk at my favorite retreat. This is my bower for meditation, and frequently for reading, too. Let us take this seat. how through these openings we catch some of the prominent points of the city. There is the obelisk of Cleopatra ; there the tower of Antonine; there the Egyptian Pyramid; and there a column going up in honor of Aurelian; and in this direction, the whole outline of the palace.

Yet are we at the same time shut out from all the world,' said I. • Your hours must fly swiftly here. But are your musings always solitary ones ?

- I am not so craving as that of my own society: sometimes I am joined by my mother, and not seldom by my sweet Fausta here,' said she, at the same time affectionately drawing Fausta's arm within her own, and clasping her hand ; .we do not agree, indeed, upon all the subjects which we discuss, but we still agree in our love.' • Indeed we do, and may the gods make it perpetual; may death only divide us!' said Fausta with fervor. 'And may the divinity who sits supreme above,' said Julia, 'grant that over that, not even death shall have If any thing makes existence valuable, it is love. If I should define my happiness, I should say it in one word, Love. Without Zenobia, what should I be? I cannot conceive of existence, deprived of her, or of her regard. Loving her, and Fausta, and Longinus as I do not to forget Livia and the dear Faustula — and beloved by all in return and my happiness scarcely seems to admit of addition.'

With what pain,' said I, does one contemplate the mere possibility that affections such as these are to last only for the few years which make up the sum of human life. Must I believe, must you believe, that all this fair scene is to end forever at death? That you, bound to each other by so many ties, are to be separated, and both of you to be divided from Zenobia, and all of us to all fall into nothingness, silence, and darkness ? Rather than that, would that the life we now enjoy might be immortal! Here are beautiful objects, among which one might be willing to live forever. I am never weary of the moon and her soft light, nor of the balmy air, nor of the bright greens of the herbage, nor of the forms of plain and mountain, nor of the human beings, infinite in the varieties of their character, who surround me wherever I go. Here now have I wandered far from my home, yet in what society and in what scenes do I find myself! The same heaven is above me, the same beautiful forms of vegetable life around me, and what is more, friends already dear as those I have left behind. In this very spot, were it but as an humble attendant upon the greatness of the queen, could I be content to dwell.'

* Truly, I think you might,' cried Fausta, having chosen for yourself so elysian a spot, and filled it with such inhabitants, it is no great proof of a contented spirit that you should love to inhabit it. But how many such spots does the world present ? — and how many such inhabitants? The question I think is, would you be ready to accept

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portly and commanding, and his belly is as a round goblet, which wanteth not liquor,' as the wise man observes in his Canticles.

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Let me not be an out-and-outer, as touching Albany. I would that my praise should be properly modified. The lower, or business parts of the city, except in the region round about the Eagle, are not particularly attractive; but in the upper quarters, near the Capitol Square, and along State-street

, few towns in our country can with it compare. I know of no place to which, in some respects, could be better applied the lines of Byron:

For whoso entereth within this town,
That sheening far, celestial seems to be,
Disconsolate will wander up and down,

Mid many things unsightly to strange ee.' But ascend you to the dome of the City Hall, in Capitol Square, and look forth upon the scene! It is beautiful — that's the word. Look at the landscape to the North, heaved up in the glory and grandeur of Summer against the sapphire walls of Heaven — varied with meadows and harvest fields, and rural mansions ; observe Troy, with its Mount Ida, and the affluent valley of the Hudson likewise the distant Cattskills —also the city beneath, with those numerous 'white swellings,' or domes, of the steeple genus, which have broken out ambitiously all over the town; look at these — and at the whole sweep of Capitol Square --- and you shall meet with great rejoicing of eye. But beware of a person whom you may observe in the streets, perambulating about with a basket on his arm, vending the sweet-flag root, and barks of prickly ash and slippery-elm. The latter, especially, should you partake of it, will cause you to remain a day beyond your time. Wonderfully slippery is that article, indeed - and you would think, to hear its owner talk, in the way of trade,' that his tongue was made of the same material.

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The route to Schenectady is dullish — but I advise the reader, if that personage be a male, to take the outside of the car, (by courtesy from the

powers that be,) and survey the country round. He will see the eternal Cattskills bounding the horizon for near two-thirds of the way — rising like pyramids, blue and lofty into Heaven,

Where clouds like earthly barriers stand,
Or bulwarks of some viewless land.'

I am discoursing now to the traveler on the Niagara route, and therefóre I would fling in a word or two of advice to him. When thou comest to Schenectady, thou wilt be grievously athirst, if the weather be warm - but I beseech thee, buy no soda water in Old Esopus. One Truax has an apology for the article — but drink it not ! It is indescribable — tastes like bad champagne, vinegar, and brimstone. A tumbler full of the Dead Sea would taste sweeter. Neither be thou tempted

10

VOL. VIII.

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was of pure gold, most elaborately carved, and covered with designs illustrative of points of the Egyptian annals. Our wine cups were also of gold, enriched with precious stones; and for each kind of wine, a different cup, set with jewels, typical of the character of the wine for which it was intended. These were all by the hand of Demetrius. It was in all respects a Roman meal, in its fashions and conduct, though the table was spread with many delicacies peculiar to the Orientals. The walls and ceiling of the room, and the carpets represented, in the colors of the most eminent Greek and Persian artists, scenes of the life and reign of the great Queen of Egypt, of whom Zenobia reckons herself a descendant. Cleopatra was all around, above, and beneath us. Music at intervals, as the repast drew toward a close, streamed in from invisible performers, and added a last and crowning charm. The conversation was light and sportful, taking once or twice only, and accidentally, as it were, a political turn. These graceful Palmyrenes act a winning part in all the high courtesies of life; and nothing could be more perfect than their demeanor, free and frank, yet never forgetful of the presence of Zenobia, nor even of me, a representative in some manner of the majesty of Rome.

The moon, nearly at her full, was already shining bright in the heavens, when we left the tables, and walking first for a time upon the cool pavements of the porticos of the palace, then descended to the gardens, and separating in groups, moved away at will among their endless windings. Zenobia, as if desiring some private conference with her great teacher, left us in company with Longinus. It was my good and happy fortune to find myself in the society of Julia and Fausta, with whom I directed my steps toward the remoter and more quiet parts of the garden — for nearer the palace there was still to be heard the sounds of merriment, and of the instruments, furnishing a soft and delicious entertainment for such as chose to remain longer in the palace. Of the rest of the company, some like ourselves wandered among the labyrinthian walks of this vast pleasure-ground, while others, already weary, or satisfied with enjoyment, returned early to their homes.

The evening, shall I say it, was worthy of the company now abroad to enjoy it. A gentle breeze just swayed the huge leaves of the - to me strange plants which overhung the paths, and came, as it here always seems to come, laden with a sweetness which in Rome it never has, unless added by the hand of Art. Dian's face shone never before so fair and bright, and her light, coming to us at frequent turns in our walk, through the spray of numerous fountains, caused them to show like falling diamonds. A divine repose breathed over the whole scene, I am sure our souls were in harmony with it.

* Princess,' said I, 'the gardens of Nero can have presented no scenes more beautiful than these. He who designed these avenues, and groups of flowers and trees, these frequent statues and fountains, bowers and mimic temples, and made them bear to each other these perfect proportions and relations, had no less knowledge, methinks, of the true principles of taste, and of the very secrets of beauty, than the great Longinus himself. The beauty is so rare, that it effects the mind almost like greatness itself. In truth, in perfect beauty there is always that which overawes.'

• I cannot say,' replied Julia, 'that the learned Greek was the archi:

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