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merciful disposition, his conciliatory spirit, his forbearing temper, his readiness to forgive. It did seem as if the country needed just such a man, with gentleness so mingled with firmness, with shrewdness so blended with simplicity, with justice so tempered by mercy, and with a goodness of heart, never ruffled by opposition, never soured by disappointment, and never embittered by hate. He was ever ready to love those that hated him, and to do good to those that despitefully entreated him.

The good man is dead, but the country he has saved will be the monument of his fame. The people will embalm his memory in their hearts. The President is dead, but the nation lives.— Troy Daily Whig.

THE NATIONAL BEREAVEMENT.

BY W. E. KISSELBURGH.

The horror with which the intelligence of the assassination of the President was received, and the anguish caused by his death throughout the North, are in no wise abated by the few hours which have elapsed since the unwelcome tidings brought their grief to every household. But time enables us more calmly to review the situation, and the effect upon

the nation's destiny. Greatly as we mourn our late beloved President, ripe as he was in the experience of the past, and successfully as he has conduct d the nation through four years of dark and desperate peril,— and the last man in the land, as it would appear, we could afford to loose; — we begin to feel that God's good Providence has directed the blow, and that he who doeth all things well, had some great and beneficial purpose to subserve in the agonizing bereavement which has fallen upon His people. None of us now doubt that Abraham Lincoln was God's chosen instrument to lead the nation through the tribulation of the past. So should we feel that having fulfilled the mission he was sent to perform — living long enough to see the bow of hope span the national horizon, and long enough to disarm malice and hate and envy in the minds and breasts of all — he has been called away to an infinitely better reward and a higher sphere of glory. The maligned, the ridiculed, the insulted man - hated as no man ever was hateddied beloved as no man since Washington ever was loved.

We must take courage from the light of the past. The hand that struck us down will raise us up again. We must gather nearer to the altar of our country than ever before, and more firmly basing the principles of our government upon the everlasting truths of Justice and Liberty, make it what Abraham Lincoln sought to make it, the purest, freest, best on earth. As he fell a martyr to liberty, we must — not in a spirit of blood-thirstiness or revenge - demand an atonement at the hands of those men who struck him down and who have labored to strike down the government of the country. We must not forget that treason has done this work, and in dealing with it, no false considerations for the wounded honor, the fictitious pride of the leaders of the rebellion, must deter us from following the principles of everlasting justice.— Troy Daily Times.

THE DEATH OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.

BY MRS. E. VAN SANTVOORD.

A Nation's mighty heart

Throbs with a voiceless woe;
The skies in pity weep,

The winds are sobbing low.
The gentle stars have veiled their light,
And deep'ning gloom enshrouds the night.

The patriot heart is stilled —

Stilled by a murderer's hand!
Strong men are bowed in grief,

And mourning fills the land.
And countless eyes are dimmed with tears,
Sad hearts oppressed with anxious fears.

A few hrief days agone
Bells
rang
with

merry peal; And brightening omens told

Our country's future weal; Flags floated on the sun-lit air, The night was o'er of our despair.

How changed the joyous scene!

Now draped in midnight gloom
The stars and stripes he loved :-

Oh, plant them o'er his tomb;
Thus may the sacred emblem keep
Sweet vigil o'er his peaceful sleep.

That warm and kindly heart,

It knew no bitter thought;
With hopeful faith and love,

Its deeds of mercy wrought;
It ne'er betrayed our fervent trust.
Our Country guards the hallowed dust!

Troy Daily Times. April 15, 1865.

COMMON COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

SPECIAL MEETING,

Monday Evening, April 17, 1865. Members Present-Hon. URI GILBERT, Mayor; Hon. John MORAN, Recorder, and Aldermen Cox, FALES, FITZGERALD, FLEMING, HAY, HISLOP, HARRITY, KEMP, McManus, MURPHY, MORRIS, NORTON, PRENTICE, SMART, STANTON, STARBUCK, SEARS, STANNARD.

On motion of Alderman Kemp, the customary routine of business was dispensed with. His Honor the Mayor stated the object of the meeting as follows:

6. The sudden and awful death of the President of the United States, by the hand of a midnight assassin, has cast a gloom over the nation, clothed every house in mourning, and filled the hearts of the people with grief which words cannot adequately describe. That we may in our corporate capacity, and in behalf of the citizens of Troy, give such public expression to the deep feeling of sadness called forth by this mournful event, which has come upon us at a time when all hearts were rejoicing at the success of our arms, and the prospect of a speedy peace to the nation, we have assembled here this evening to take such action as becomes a bereaved people under such a sad calamity. Gentlemen, the matter is in your hands, and I am confident whatever you propose will be worthy the ity and befitting the occasion.” Alderman Kemp offered the following resolutions :

At a time when the heavy hand of national sorrow has been laid upon us like a weary burthen, and the mourning that is in our streets reflects the gloom visible in every countenance, the Common Council of the city of Troy deem it meet and proper to give a public expression and an enduring record of the grief so universally felt by the community. Leaving it to the historian to record the tragic events; to men of sacred calling to draw lessons of wisdom; to the stricken family to bow down, and the entire people to mourn, we desire to join in the general wail that is rising from every city and hamlet in the land ; therefore,

Besolved, That while we would not be unmoved at the murder of a citizen, however humble, we doubly shudder at the assassination of the head of the nation;

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