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REMARKS ON A PERSIAN LEGEND IN ATHENÆUS. late number of the Gentle- thus, deeply loving each other from the

vizine, I gave some remarks image in the dream. Now Odatis was medge in the “ Various Ilistory” the fairest of all the women in Asia, and ..), which appeared to throw

Zariadres too was fair; but on his asking misting light on a part of the

her in marriage of her father, Omartes in literature of Persia, as pre

would not consent, as he had no other la the national epic, or Shah

child but this one daughter, and he

wished to marry her to some one of his In this long poem, as I there

own people, that she might be ever near preserved, as in a mausoleum, him. And not long afterwards, Omartes e nation knows of its ancient summoned all the noblemen of his kingdom, mnd, though many circum- and all his friends and relations, and made live conspired to corrupt the a marriage feast, but he told no one who f these traditions, and the it was that was to marry his daughter.

tme and barbarism, as wellAnd at length when the feast was at its cial vanity, have mutilated height, he called Odatis into the hall, and ned many of their original said to hier in the hearing of all the guests, :16, we may still continually

() my daughter Odatis, we are now t of the ancient features, and

making thy marriage feast; look round

therefore on the guests and view them all, ly restore them. The Greek

and take a golden cup and fill it, and give ve left us so much valuable it to him whom thou wilt choose as thy

to assist us in our labours, husband; for his wife shalt thou be.' task of partially separating And she then, looking round upon all, from the mass of fiction, is walked slowly away, longing to see her considerably easier; and if Zariadres. For she had previously sent y of Ctesias had been pre a message to him, how that her marriage tead of its meagre epitome was about to be solemnized. And he , perhaps we might have

happened at the time to be encamped by all the truth which the

the Tanais, and immediately on bearing i preserves in its stories.

it, he left the army secretly, and set out

with his charioteer; and after driving hard t of this, however, it is inlay hold of all the means

over more than 800 stadia, he reached the

city by night; and on drawing near to the l', and the following ex- place where the revel was held, he left his

Athenæus is one which, attendant with the chariot hard by, and Vis hitherto never been marched boldly in, having put on a obably most of the Shah- Scythian dress. And on his entering the

ds might be identified hall, he bebeld Odatis standing by the in a similar manner, if cup-board (TOŪ kvdikelov), and weeping | 113 more of the Greek bitterly, as she slowly filled the cup; and ia.

standing close by her, he said in a low ath book of his “ Dein

voice, 0 Odatis, I am come as thou enaus relates the fol

badest,-1, thy Zariadres.' And she, turnwill the twelfth book of

ing round and beholding the fair stranger,

so like him whom she had seen in her te's history of Alex dream, joyfully put the cup into his hand,

and he, seizing her in his arms, bore her * the younger brother of away to his chariot, and fled. And the wth were fair ; and the

servants and handmaidens, who knew of * the people was that

their love, stood silent, and when the of Venus and Adopis.

father ordered them to speak, they said · over Media, and the

that they knew not whither she was gone. . and Zaria res over the

And this their love is known amongst all Caspian gates as far as

the dwellers in Asia, and greatly indeed Omartes, the king of

do they prize it, and they sculpture it on Itse beyond the Tauais,

their temples and palaces, aye and even med Odatis, and the

in their own private houses; and many of e once saw Zariadres

the nobles call their daughters Odatis, fell in love with him : after her."

* also happened unto It would bave been sad, if a legend he time they continued so universally known as Chares states UL. XXVIII.

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Inscription in the Chapel at Hierna

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Engraved Token in copper.

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INSCRIPTION IN THE CHAPEL AT ALVERNA.

(With a Plate.) MR. URBAN,

wife of the emperor Charlemagne, who IN your Magazine for Oct. 1835 is died in the year 794, which is arranged engraved a sepulchral inscription, now

in a similar manner. preserved at Lacock Abbey, in Wilt On visiting the chapel of the Stig, shire, but removed from Monkton mata at Alverna, in the Casentino,--Farley, in the same county, which is

Nel crudo Sasso intra Tevere ed Arno very remarkable for the manner in

Da Cristo prese l'ultimo sigillo, which it is abbreviated by many letters Che le sue membra du' anni portarno. being inclosed within others. Its date

Dante, Paradiso, xi. 106-108. was assigned to about the year 1185; and other English inscriptions of the I noticed an inscription of a similar same kind are there referred to.

character, the inclosed copy of which In the Archæologia, vol. xxix. p. 369, (see the Plate) will perhaps be interhas also been published the inscription

esting to your readers.
at Mayence to the memory of Fastrada,

It may be read as follows:
Anno Domini MCCLXIIII. Feriâ Quintá post Festum
Assumptionis gloriose Virginis Marie Comes
Simon Filius illustris viri comitis Guidonis
Dei Gratia in Tuscia Palatini fecit fundari istud Oratorium ad hono-
rem beati Francisci ...... cui in loco isto Seraph apparuit
sub anno Domini mccxxv. infra octavam
Nativitatis ejusdem Virginis et cori ejus impressit
Stigmata Jesu Christi ; consignet eum gratia Spiritus Sancti.

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(It will be observed that the mark of contraction over the word NATIVITATIS is

redundant, and an evident mistake of the sculptor.) I need scarcely add that the Conti derive additional interest from their Guidi here referred to are the famous association with the names of Dante Counts of the Casentino so frequently and Petrarch. mentioned in the medieval history of Your readers will recollect in Dante this part of Italy, and whose palaces (Inferno, xvi. 34),– of Poppi, Romena, and Battifolle,

Questi, l'orme di cui pestar mi vedi,

Tutto che nudo e dipelato vada,

Fu di grado maggior, che tu non credi;
Nepote fu della buona Gualdrada ;

Guidoguerra ebbe nome, ed in sua vita
Fece col senno assai, e con la spada.

Our Simone was a first cousin of their common grandmother having this Guidoguerra (third of that name), been “ la Buona Gualdrada."

Guido Guerra 11. died before 1216,
marr. Gualdrada de' Ravignani.

Marcovaldo.

Guido.
pod
Guidoguerra III.

Guido Novello.

Simone.
Simone and his brother Guido No- paldino, between the Florentines and
vello built (or rebuilt) the walls of Aretines, in which Dante distinguished
Poppi

, and were the founders in 1262 himself. The warlike bishop of Arezzo, of the church and monastery of Cer Guiglelmino degli Ubertini, made his tomondo, close to which was fought, last stand near the church already in 1289, the celebrated battle of Cams named, and died there in his barness,

Inscriptions remind me of epitaphs, and the explanation subjoined was and epitaphs of a curious specimen of given to me on the spot. I made no the dialect of Cento, the birth-place note of the apparent age of the meof Guercino ; it is on one side of the morial, but believe it to be from 20 to principal entrance to the church of 50 years old. the Madonna del Rosario in that city,

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Uomn e don anca vu Jus
Areurdeu ch'a son in stbus
E za ch'a passa a' per d' qui
Dsi una requiem anc per mi
Dsì mal ben en' val scurda
Ch' a v'al dmand in carità
Ferdinandus Baruffaldi

Sacerdos V.P.
Uomini, e donne, anche voi ragazzi,
Ricordatevi ch' io sono in questo sepolcro ;
E già che passate per da qui,
Dite una requiem anche per me
Dite me la bene e non vi ne scordate,
Perchè vi la dimando per carità.
Ferdinandus Baruffaldus
Sacerdos Vivens posuit.

Yours, &c.

F. C. B.

MR. URBAN,

June 15. sessed the privilege of pre-emption. I I BEG to request the attention of have not, however, any evidence to your antiquarian readers to an object give in support of this conjecture; and of curiosity, the original purpose of shall be thankful for reference to any which I have hitherto been unable to other relics of similar character that ascertain. It is a piece of copper, of would throw light on the subject. the same size as represented in the The little shields of metal, somePlate, and of the thickness of a half what smaller than this roundel, which crown. The figures upon it are raised have been noticed and figured in the in relief by deep engraving; there are Archæological Journal, vol. iii. p. 79, apparently slight remains of gilding in have been pronounced to be ornaments the lines of that side which contains of horse-furniture. They differ from the the monogram of Jhesus ; and there are present object in possessing rings for evidently portions of a purple enamel suspension, whilst this must have been or pigment on the other side between always carried in the hand or the pouch. the legs of the eagle of St. John. The I am unacquainted with its history, inscription Ion below the eagle is, I further than that I purchased it with presume, in the English language. some matrices of seals at the sale in

From the circumstance of both de London of the antiquities collected by signs being religious, it may be sup the late Dean of St. Patrick's, and he posed to have belonged to some ec had marked it with the number 178. clesiastical person or corporation, and If the MS. catalogue of his collection I have imagined it might have been is preserved, it may possibly contain made as the warrant with which a some memorandum relating to this steward or purveyor went to market, article. where his master or his convent pos

Yours, &c. J. G. N.

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REMARKS ON A PERSIAN LEGEND IN ATHENÆUS.

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IN a late number of the Gentle- thus, deeply loving each other from the man's Magazine, I gave some remarks image in the dream. Now Odatis was on a passage in the “ Various llistory” the fairest of all the women in Asia, and of Ælian, which appeared to throw

Zariadres too was fair; but on his asking an interesting light on a part of the

her in marriage of her father, Omartes romantic literature of Persia, as pre

would not consent, as he had no other

child but this one daughter, and he served in the national epic, or Shah

wished to marry her to some one of his nameh. In this long poem, as I there

own people, that she might be ever near stated, is preserved, as in a mausoleum, hin. And not long afterwards, Omartes all that the nation knows of its ancient summoned all the noblemen of his kingdom, history; and, though many circum- and all his friends and relations, and made stances have conspired to corrupt the a marriage feast, but he told no one who purity of these traditions, and the it was that was to marry his daughter. ravages of time and barbarism, as well And at length when the feast was at its as national vanity, have mutilated height, le called Odatis into the hall, and and etfaced many of their 'original said to lier in the hearing of all the guests, lincaments, we may still continually

O my daugliter Odatis, we are trace some of the ancient features, and making thy marriage feast; look round

therefore on the guests and view them all, even partly restore them. The Greek

and take a golden cup and fill it, and give writers have left us so much valuable

it to him whom thou wilt choose as thy information to assist us in our labours, husband; for his wife shalt thou be.' that the task of partially separating And she then, looking round upon all, the truth from the mass of fiction, is walked slowly away, longing to see her rendered considerably easier; and if Zariadres. For she had previously sent the history of Ctesias had been pre a message to him, how that her marriage served, instead of its meagre epitome

was about to be solemnized. And he in Photius, perhaps we might have

pened at the time to be encamped by recovered all the truth which the

the Tanais, and immediately on bearing

it, he left the army secretly, and set out Shahnameh preserves in its stories.

with his charioleer; and after driving hard In the want of this, however, it is in

over more than 8G0 stadia, he reached the teresting to lay hold of all the means

city by night; and on drawing near to the in our power, and the following ex place where the revel was held, he left his tract from Athenæus is one which, attendant with the chariot hard by, and I believe, has hitherto never been marched boldly in, having put on noticed. Probably most of the Shah- Scythian dress. And on his entering the namel's legends might be identified hall, he belield Odatis standing by the and proved, in a similar manner, if cup-board ( ToŨ KvAukciov), and weeping time had spared us more of the Greek bitterly, as she slowly filled the cup; and authors on Persia.

standing close by her, he said in a low In the thirteenth book of his “ Deip- voice, Odatis, I am come as thou nosophists,” Athenæus relates the fol badest,-1, thy Zariadres.' And she, turnlowing story from the twelfth book of ing round and beholding the fair stranger,

so like him whom she had seen in her Chares of Mitylene's history of Alex

dream, joyfully put the cup into his hand, ander.

and he, seizing her in his arms, bore her “ Zariadres was the younger brother of away to his chariot, and fled. And the llystaapes, and both were fair ; and the

servants and landmaidens, who knew of tradition amongst the people was that

their love, stood silent, and when the they were born of Venus and Adonis,

fa: her ordered them to speak, they said Hystaspes ruled over Media, and the

that they knew not whither she was gone. country below it; and Zaria res over the

And this their love is known amongst all country above the Caspian gates as far as

the dwellers in Asia, and greatly indeed the Tanais. Now Omartes, the king of do they prize it, and they sculpture it on the Marathi, a tribe beyond the Tauais, their temples and palaces, aye and even had a daughter named Odatis, and the

in their own private houses ; and many of legend runs, that she once saw Zariadres

the nobles call their daughters Odatis, in a dream, and fell in love with him ;

after her." and the same thing also happened unto

It would have been sad, if a legend him. And for some time they continued so universally known as Chares states GENT. MAG. VOL. XXVIII.

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