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THE ORIGINAL.

BY

THOMAS WALKER, M.A.

TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE;

BARRISTER AT LAW, AND ONE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES OF THE

METROPOLIS.

SECOND EDITION.

LONDON :
HENRY RENSHAW, 356, STRAND.

1836.

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IBOTSON AND PAIMER, PRINTERS, SAVOY STREET, STRAND.

13.

Hot Water, 374.

Poor Laws in Ireland, 109.

Poverty and Pauperism, 193.
Imposition, 282, 290.

Praise of Wine, 325
Impressment, 405.

Preferment to Place, 191.

Injury and Insult, 146.

Preliminary Address, 1.

Iscariotism, 130.

Principle of Poor Laws, 313.

Italy, 42.

Principles of Government, 3.

Prison Discipline, 349.
Letters from the Continent, 137,

Prize Fights, 342.
152, 169, 184, 198.

Punctuality, 55.

Liberty, 365.

Life, 11.

Reform, 397.

Life of Numa, 14.

Regulation of Charity, 135.

Locke's opinion of the Gospel, 12.

Remarks on the Life of Numa,

London in Times Past and Pre-

sent, 40.

Roasted Apples, 373.

Marriage in Low Life, 147.

Romeo and Juliet, 352.
Midnight Reflections, 331.
Miscellaneous, 376, 395, 404,

Sailors, 299, 309.

Savings Banks, 413.
424, 435.

Savings Banks for Seamen, 381.

Mobs, 121.

Mount Vesuvius, 58.

Sayings, 11, 74, 123, 149, 204,

347, 361.

My Mother, 121.

Self Discipline, 280.

National Characteristics, 181. Sick Wives, 229.

Silver Threepences and Four-

Observance of the Sabbath, 48.

pences, 144.

Office of Coroner, 157.

Suppers, 378, 393.

Ornament, 231.

Parks, The, 296.

Tea and Coffee, 425.

Parochial Government, 29, 45,

Temper, 196.

61, 77, 93.

Two Good Dishes, 85.

Parochial Improvement, 67.

Twopenny Post, 267.

Pauperism, 249, 266, 275, 419.

Philosopher and the Merchant, | Youth and Age, 263.

The, 6.

BY THOMAS WALKER, M. A.

TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,

BARRISTER AT LAW, AND ONE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES OF THE METROPOLIS.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 12 O'CLOCK, BY H. RENSHAW,

356, STRAND, NEARLY OPPOSITE WELLINGTON STREET.

No. I.]

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 1835. [Price 3d.

PRELIMINARY ADDRESS,

DEAR READER, I address you without ceremony, because I do not like ceremony, and because I hope we shall soon be on intimate terms. I have long meditated this mode of introducing myself to your acquaintance, from a belief that it might be for our mutual advantage: for mine, by furnishing a constant and interesting stimulus to my faculties of observation and reflection; for yours, by setting before you an alterative diet of sound and comfortable doctrines blended with innoxious amusement.

It is my purpose to treat, as forcibly, perspicuously, and concisely as each subject and my own ability will allow, of whatever is most interesting and important in Religion and Politics, in Morals and Manners, and in our Habits and Customs. Besides my graver discussions, I shall present you with original anecdotes, narratives, and miscellaneous matters, and with occasional extracts from other authors, just as I think I can most contribute to your instruction or amusement; and even my lightest articles I shall, as often as I am able, make subservient to the illustration of some sound prin

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