The Uses of History in Early Modern England

Capa
Paulina Kewes
University of California Press, 2006 - 449 páginas
00 The essays in this collection investigate the ways in which the past was exploited to meet the concerns of the present in early modern England. The understanding of the past in this period was characterized by a deepening and more fully articulated conception of time and history, with its roots in impassioned religious and political controversies. The discourses that arose from this dialogue informed and drew together a range of genres and activities: prose accounts, polemical tracts, poems, plays, romances, secret histories, novels. Although many of these genres are no longer recognized as history, early modern writers and readers treated them as such. In assessing the uses of the past, these essays consider "literary" and "factual" writings side by side, avoiding traditional chronological and disciplinary divisions and the artificial separation of secular from ecclesiastical history. Cumulatively, they supply the context and provide a vast array of evidence for the way in which the deployment of history for political, religious, moral, aesthetic, or commercial purposes shifted between the mid-sixteenth century and the late eighteenth. The essays in this collection investigate the ways in which the past was exploited to meet the concerns of the present in early modern England. The understanding of the past in this period was characterized by a deepening and more fully articulated conception of time and history, with its roots in impassioned religious and political controversies. The discourses that arose from this dialogue informed and drew together a range of genres and activities: prose accounts, polemical tracts, poems, plays, romances, secret histories, novels. Although many of these genres are no longer recognized as history, early modern writers and readers treated them as such. In assessing the uses of the past, these essays consider "literary" and "factual" writings side by side, avoiding traditional chronological and disciplinary divisions and the artificial separation of secular from ecclesiastical history. Cumulatively, they supply the context and provide a vast array of evidence for the way in which the deployment of history for political, religious, moral, aesthetic, or commercial purposes shifted between the mid-sixteenth century and the late eighteenth.
 

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Conteúdo

Five Transitions
31
Historians and Poets
69
Against the Teleology of Technique
91
Catholic and Protestant
105
Guides to Reading Foxes Book of Martyrs
131
Nicholas Sanders
147
Discourses of History in Elizabethan and
201
The Dynamic of Early
223
Clarendon Tacitism and the Civil Wars of Europe
285
The Church
307
The Tory Interpretation of History in the Rage of Parties
347
Or Talebearing Inside and Outside
367
History and the Novel in EighteenthCentury Britain
389
Afterword
407
Index
421
Direitos autorais

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Sobre o autor (2006)

Paulina Kewes is a fellow and tutor in English literature at Jesus College, Oxford, and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. F. J. Levy is an emeritus professor of history, University of Washington.

Informações bibliográficas